Discussion:
brought wolves in from the cold
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Lazypierrot
2021-01-23 03:01:39 UTC
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I would like to know about the phrase "brought wolves in from the cold" in the following passage. I wonder if it means literally as the words express, or is it rathe a kind of set phrase which has another meaning than its literal one.


The study noted that an alternative reason for the human-dog bond could be that humans have a preference for other individuals which have whites in the eye and that raising the eyebrow exposes the white part of a dog’s eyes. It is not known why or precisely when humans first brought wolves in from the cold and the evolution from wolf to dog began, but this research helps us understand some of the likely mechanisms underlying dog domestication , the study said.


Cordially,

LP
Stefan Ram
2021-01-23 03:15:19 UTC
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Post by Lazypierrot
It is not known why or precisely when humans first brought wolves
in from the cold and the evolution from wolf to dog began,
|To bring in from the cold.
|To allow to join or participate in a group.
Tony Cooper
2021-01-23 03:55:50 UTC
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Post by Stefan Ram
Post by Lazypierrot
It is not known why or precisely when humans first brought wolves
in from the cold and the evolution from wolf to dog began,
|To bring in from the cold.
|To allow to join or participate in a group.
With that meaning, it's usually referring to someone who has been
previously excluded or has been in hiding.
--
Tony Cooper Orlando Florida
Horace LaBadie
2021-01-23 05:13:04 UTC
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Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Stefan Ram
Post by Lazypierrot
It is not known why or precisely when humans first brought wolves
in from the cold and the evolution from wolf to dog began,
|To bring in from the cold.
|To allow to join or participate in a group.
With that meaning, it's usually referring to someone who has been
previously excluded or has been in hiding.
The Spy Who Came In From The Cold.
Tony Cooper
2021-01-23 03:52:59 UTC
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On Fri, 22 Jan 2021 19:01:39 -0800 (PST), Lazypierrot
Post by Lazypierrot
I would like to know about the phrase "brought wolves in from the cold" in the following passage. I wonder if it means literally as the words express, or is it rathe a kind of set phrase which has another meaning than its literal one.
The study noted that an alternative reason for the human-dog bond could be that humans have a preference for other individuals which have whites in the eye and that raising the eyebrow exposes the white part of a dog’s eyes. It is not known why or precisely when humans first brought wolves in from the cold and the evolution from wolf to dog began, but this research helps us understand some of the likely mechanisms underlying dog domestication , the study said.
Certainly not a set phrase in AmE. It appears to be used to mean that
man brought wolves into their close enviornment and domesticated them.

I don't think it has anything to do with outside temperature. It's
not literal in that sense. "The cold" is just is just a metaphor for
"not in their normal environment".

The author's opinion seems to be in conflict with other opinions about
the whites of a dog's eye. "Whale eye" is usually associated with
stress in dogs, and is often a signal that the dog will snap.

https://www.thesprucepets.com/dog-body-language-whale-eye-1118257
--
Tony Cooper Orlando Florida
Lewis
2021-01-23 11:13:31 UTC
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Post by Tony Cooper
On Fri, 22 Jan 2021 19:01:39 -0800 (PST), Lazypierrot
Post by Lazypierrot
I would like to know about the phrase "brought wolves in from the cold" in the following passage. I wonder if it means literally as the words express, or is it rathe a kind of set phrase which has another meaning than its literal one.
The study noted that an alternative reason for the human-dog bond could be that humans have a preference for other individuals which have whites in the eye and that raising the eyebrow exposes the white part of a dog’s eyes. It is not known why or precisely when humans first brought wolves in from the cold and the evolution from wolf to dog began, but this research helps us understand some of the likely mechanisms underlying dog domestication , the study said.
Certainly not a set phrase in AmE. It appears to be used to mean that
man brought wolves into their close enviornment and domesticated them.
I don't think it has anything to do with outside temperature. It's
not literal in that sense. "The cold" is just is just a metaphor for
"not in their normal environment".
The author's opinion seems to be in conflict with other opinions about
the whites of a dog's eye. "Whale eye" is usually associated with
stress in dogs, and is often a signal that the dog will snap.
https://www.thesprucepets.com/dog-body-language-whale-eye-1118257
Our dog raises his eyebrow (usually just the one) in a quizzical manner.
It's pretty amusing. Then usually he runs as far away as he can get and
then barks at what caused him to lift that eyebrow.

He's the biggest coward of a dog I've ever seen. Our other dog will
charge the front door when the neighbors roll down the wheelie bins to
let them know they are intruding on her turf (the whole of the
outdoors).
--
THE DEATH OF A WARRIOR OR THE OLD MAN OR THE LITTLE CHILD, THIS I
UNDERSTAND, AND I TAKE AWAY THE PAIN AND END THE SUFFERING. I DO
NOT UNDERSTAND THIS DEATH-OF-THE-MIND. --The Light Fantastic
Tony Cooper
2021-01-23 14:37:45 UTC
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On Sat, 23 Jan 2021 11:13:31 -0000 (UTC), Lewis
Post by Lewis
Post by Tony Cooper
On Fri, 22 Jan 2021 19:01:39 -0800 (PST), Lazypierrot
Post by Lazypierrot
I would like to know about the phrase "brought wolves in from the cold" in the following passage. I wonder if it means literally as the words express, or is it rathe a kind of set phrase which has another meaning than its literal one.
The study noted that an alternative reason for the human-dog bond could be that humans have a preference for other individuals which have whites in the eye and that raising the eyebrow exposes the white part of a dog?s eyes. It is not known why or precisely when humans first brought wolves in from the cold and the evolution from wolf to dog began, but this research helps us understand some of the likely mechanisms underlying dog domestication , the study said.
Certainly not a set phrase in AmE. It appears to be used to mean that
man brought wolves into their close enviornment and domesticated them.
I don't think it has anything to do with outside temperature. It's
not literal in that sense. "The cold" is just is just a metaphor for
"not in their normal environment".
The author's opinion seems to be in conflict with other opinions about
the whites of a dog's eye. "Whale eye" is usually associated with
stress in dogs, and is often a signal that the dog will snap.
https://www.thesprucepets.com/dog-body-language-whale-eye-1118257
Our dog raises his eyebrow (usually just the one) in a quizzical manner.
It's pretty amusing. Then usually he runs as far away as he can get and
then barks at what caused him to lift that eyebrow.
He's the biggest coward of a dog I've ever seen. Our other dog will
charge the front door when the neighbors roll down the wheelie bins to
let them know they are intruding on her turf (the whole of the
outdoors).
The first two readings confused me. I missed the word "other" and
wondered how the dog changed from a "his" to a "her" when charging the
door.

The scene was set for this when the post started with "Our dog" and
not "One of our dogs".
--
Tony Cooper Orlando Florida
Peter T. Daniels
2021-01-23 16:22:39 UTC
Permalink
I would like to know about the phrase "brought wolves in from the cold" in the following passage. I wonder if it means literally as the words express, or is it rathe a kind of set phrase which has another meaning than its literal one.
The study noted that an alternative reason for the human-dog bond could be that humans have a preference for other individuals which have whites in the eye and that raising the eyebrow exposes the white part of a dog’s eyes. It is not known why or precisely when humans first brought wolves in from the cold and the evolution from wolf to dog began, but this research helps us understand some of the likely mechanisms underlying dog domestication , the study said.
Why would you be looking for a figure of speech when the
passage is literally about domesticating wolves into dogs?

Yes, "come in from the cold" is a cliché -- but how familiar
was it before the Le Carré novel? -- and "bring in from the
cold" would be the causative of that expression (which I
explored in my contribution to the *CLS Book of Squibs*
in, IIRC, 1977).

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