Discussion:
English teacher wrong to say U must follow Q
(too old to reply)
Dingbat
2019-10-21 21:50:12 UTC
Permalink
The letter Q is almost always followed by a U in English,
but that isn't always the case.
https://www.businessinsider.in/strategy/your-english-teacher-was-wrong-there-are-tons-of-words-that-have-a-q-but-no-u/articleshow/65955476.cms

Having two "always" in the sentence looks jarring.

I'd say:
The letter Q is usually followed by a U in English,
but that isn't always the case.
Quinn C
2019-10-21 22:23:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dingbat
The letter Q is almost always followed by a U in English,
but that isn't always the case.
https://www.businessinsider.in/strategy/your-english-teacher-was-wrong-there-are-tons-of-words-that-have-a-q-but-no-u/articleshow/65955476.cms
Having two "always" in the sentence looks jarring.
True. But U must follow Q nevertheless. Follow Q! U must!
--
Was den Juengeren fehlt, sind keine Botschaften, es ist der Sinn
fuer Zusammenhaenge. [Young people aren't short of messages, but
of a sense for interconnections.]
-- Helen Feng im Zeit-Interview
Eric Walker
2019-10-22 01:25:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dingbat
The letter Q is almost always followed by a U in English,
but that isn't always the case.
https://www.businessinsider.in/strategy/your-english-teacher-was-wrong-
there-are-tons-of-words-that-have-a-q-but-no-u/articleshow/65955476.cms
Post by Dingbat
Having two "always" in the sentence looks jarring.
The letter Q is usually followed by a U in English,
but that isn't always the case.
Simplify: In English, the letter Q is normally but not inevitably
followed by a U.
--
Cordially,
Eric Walker
Dingbat
2019-10-22 06:09:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dingbat
Post by Dingbat
The letter Q is almost always followed by a U in English,
but that isn't always the case.
https://www.businessinsider.in/strategy/your-english-teacher-was-wrong-
there-are-tons-of-words-that-have-a-q-but-no-u/articleshow/65955476.cms
Post by Dingbat
Having two "always" in the sentence looks jarring.
The letter Q is usually followed by a U in English,
but that isn't always the case.
Simplify: In English, the letter Q is normally but not inevitably
followed by a U.
That's better than my rewording; thanks.
Quinn C
2019-10-22 17:13:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dingbat
Post by Dingbat
Post by Dingbat
The letter Q is almost always followed by a U in English,
but that isn't always the case.
https://www.businessinsider.in/strategy/your-english-teacher-was-wrong-
there-are-tons-of-words-that-have-a-q-but-no-u/articleshow/65955476.cms
Post by Dingbat
Having two "always" in the sentence looks jarring.
The letter Q is usually followed by a U in English,
but that isn't always the case.
Simplify: In English, the letter Q is normally but not inevitably
followed by a U.
That's better than my rewording; thanks.
I don't think it's necessary to bring destiny into it.
--
The trouble some people have being German, I thought,
I have being human.
-- Margaret Atwood, Surfacing (novel), p.130
CDB
2019-10-22 19:38:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by Quinn C
Post by Dingbat
Post by Eric Walker
The letter Q is almost always followed by a U in English, but
that isn't always the case.
https://www.businessinsider.in/strategy/your-english-teacher-was-wrong-
there-are-tons-of-words-that-have-a-q-but-no-u/articleshow/65955476.cms
Post by Quinn C
Post by Dingbat
Post by Eric Walker
Having two "always" in the sentence looks jarring.
I'd say: The letter Q is usually followed by a U in English,
but that isn't always the case.
Simplify: In English, the letter Q is normally but not
inevitably followed by a U.
That's better than my rewording; thanks.
I don't think it's necessary to bring destiny into it.
"Qantas" is an unusual case: the "u" is not silent, but invisible. It
speaks to the routine expectations of anglophones, perhaps.
John Varela
2019-10-22 21:58:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dingbat
Post by Quinn C
Post by Dingbat
Post by Eric Walker
The letter Q is almost always followed by a U in English, but
that isn't always the case.
https://www.businessinsider.in/strategy/your-english-teacher-was-wrong-
there-are-tons-of-words-that-have-a-q-but-no-u/articleshow/65955476.cms
Post by Quinn C
Post by Dingbat
Post by Eric Walker
Having two "always" in the sentence looks jarring.
I'd say: The letter Q is usually followed by a U in English,
but that isn't always the case.
Simplify: In English, the letter Q is normally but not
inevitably followed by a U.
That's better than my rewording; thanks.
I don't think it's necessary to bring destiny into it.
"Qantas" is an unusual case: the "u" is not silent, but invisible. It
speaks to the routine expectations of anglophones, perhaps.
QANTAS is an acronym. The exceptions to Q is followed by U in
English are acronyms and words imported from other languages (like
the letter K in Spanish). If you have an example of an actual
English word in which Q is not followed by U, please cite it.
--
John Varela
Quinn C
2019-10-22 22:37:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by John Varela
Post by Dingbat
Post by Quinn C
Post by Dingbat
Post by Eric Walker
The letter Q is almost always followed by a U in English, but
that isn't always the case.
https://www.businessinsider.in/strategy/your-english-teacher-was-wrong-
there-are-tons-of-words-that-have-a-q-but-no-u/articleshow/65955476.cms
Post by Quinn C
Post by Dingbat
Post by Eric Walker
Having two "always" in the sentence looks jarring.
I'd say: The letter Q is usually followed by a U in English,
but that isn't always the case.
Simplify: In English, the letter Q is normally but not
inevitably followed by a U.
That's better than my rewording; thanks.
I don't think it's necessary to bring destiny into it.
"Qantas" is an unusual case: the "u" is not silent, but invisible. It
speaks to the routine expectations of anglophones, perhaps.
QANTAS is an acronym. The exceptions to Q is followed by U in
English are acronyms and words imported from other languages (like
the letter K in Spanish). If you have an example of an actual
English word in which Q is not followed by U, please cite it.
Your definition of "actual English word" is too restrictive. Three
words in that last sentence are imported from another language, without
me trying to make a point..
--
"Bother", said the Borg, as they assimilated Pooh.
Ross
2019-10-23 00:07:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by John Varela
Post by Dingbat
Post by Quinn C
Post by Dingbat
Post by Eric Walker
The letter Q is almost always followed by a U in English, but
that isn't always the case.
https://www.businessinsider.in/strategy/your-english-teacher-was-wrong-
there-are-tons-of-words-that-have-a-q-but-no-u/articleshow/65955476.cms
Post by Quinn C
Post by Dingbat
Post by Eric Walker
Having two "always" in the sentence looks jarring.
I'd say: The letter Q is usually followed by a U in English,
but that isn't always the case.
Simplify: In English, the letter Q is normally but not
inevitably followed by a U.
That's better than my rewording; thanks.
I don't think it's necessary to bring destiny into it.
"Qantas" is an unusual case: the "u" is not silent, but invisible. It
speaks to the routine expectations of anglophones, perhaps.
QANTAS is an acronym. The exceptions to Q is followed by U in
English are acronyms and words imported from other languages (like
the letter K in Spanish). If you have an example of an actual
English word in which Q is not followed by U, please cite it.
--
John Varela
I think you'll find that most of the words with QU are also "imported
from other languages" (Latin, French). The exceptions are _recent_
importations from Arabic etc.
Peter Moylan
2019-10-23 06:26:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by Quinn C
Post by Dingbat
Post by Eric Walker
Simplify: In English, the letter Q is normally but not
inevitably followed by a U.
That's better than my rewording; thanks.
I don't think it's necessary to bring destiny into it.
"Qantas" is an unusual case: the "u" is not silent, but invisible. It
speaks to the routine expectations of anglophones, perhaps.
The 'u' is pronounced, even if not written, because the 'Q' stands for
"Queensland". Qantas is no longer a Queensland company, as far as I
know, but it was historically[1].

I have just learnt that Qantas has registered the domain name
quantas.com, apparently because the spelling checker in MS-Word kept
inserting the 'u'. I don't have easy access to MS-Word to see whether
this is still true.

[1] Queensland and Northern Territory Aerial Service. That's a use of
"aerial" that has, I think, since disappeared from the language.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
charles
2019-10-23 07:05:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Quinn C
Post by Dingbat
Post by Eric Walker
Simplify: In English, the letter Q is normally but not
inevitably followed by a U.
That's better than my rewording; thanks.
I don't think it's necessary to bring destiny into it.
"Qantas" is an unusual case: the "u" is not silent, but invisible. It
speaks to the routine expectations of anglophones, perhaps.
The 'u' is pronounced, even if not written, because the 'Q' stands for
"Queensland". Qantas is no longer a Queensland company, as far as I
know, but it was historically[1].
I have just learnt that Qantas has registered the domain name
quantas.com, apparently because the spelling checker in MS-Word kept
inserting the 'u'. I don't have easy access to MS-Word to see whether
this is still true.
[1] Queensland and Northern Territory Aerial Service. That's a use of
"aerial" that has, I think, since disappeared from the language.
in the UK we have the company Arqiva - a made up word.
--
from KT24 in Surrey, England
"I'd rather die of exhaustion than die of boredom" Thomas Carlyle
Ken Blake
2019-10-22 15:48:04 UTC
Permalink
On Tue, 22 Oct 2019 01:25:14 -0000 (UTC), Eric Walker
Post by Dingbat
Post by Dingbat
The letter Q is almost always followed by a U in English,
but that isn't always the case.
https://www.businessinsider.in/strategy/your-english-teacher-was-wrong-
there-are-tons-of-words-that-have-a-q-but-no-u/articleshow/65955476.cms
Post by Dingbat
Having two "always" in the sentence looks jarring.
The letter Q is usually followed by a U in English,
but that isn't always the case.
Simplify: In English, the letter Q is normally but not inevitably
followed by a U.
Or to simplify it further, "The letter Q is usually followed by a U in
English."

"Usually" implies "but not inevitably ," and makes including it
unnecessary.

Perhaps even better is "The letter Q is almost always followed by a U
in English."

:
s***@gowanhill.com
2019-10-22 21:25:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by Eric Walker
Simplify: In English, the letter Q is normally but not inevitably
followed by a U.
It's quite often followed by R, S, T, ...

Owain
RH Draney
2019-10-23 05:42:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by s***@gowanhill.com
Post by Eric Walker
Simplify: In English, the letter Q is normally but not inevitably
followed by a U.
It's quite often followed by R, S, T, ...
And preceded by the letter elemenopy....r
Peter Moylan
2019-10-23 06:28:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by RH Draney
Post by s***@gowanhill.com
Post by Eric Walker
Simplify: In English, the letter Q is normally but not inevitably
followed by a U.
It's quite often followed by R, S, T, ...
And preceded by the letter elemenopy....r
My eldest son learnt the American Alphabet Song from Sesame Street.
That's how he learnt to sing

A B C D E F G
H I J K la-la-la-la P
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2019-10-22 06:07:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dingbat
The letter Q is almost always followed by a U in English,
but that isn't always the case.
https://www.businessinsider.in/strategy/your-english-teacher-was-wrong-there-are-tons-of-words-that-have-a-q-but-no-u/articleshow/65955476.cms
That's a very silly article: "tons" is a gross exaggeration, and
virtually all are words that have no significant currency in English,
apart, nowadays, from burqa and niqab.
Post by Dingbat
Having two "always" in the sentence looks jarring.
The letter Q is usually followed by a U in English,
but that isn't always the case.
--
athel
Peter T. Daniels
2019-10-22 15:09:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Dingbat
The letter Q is almost always followed by a U in English,
but that isn't always the case.
https://www.businessinsider.in/strategy/your-english-teacher-was-wrong-there-are-tons-of-words-that-have-a-q-but-no-u/articleshow/65955476.cms
That's a very silly article: "tons" is a gross exaggeration, and
virtually all are words that have no significant currency in English,
apart, nowadays, from burqa and niqab.
and Iraq and Qatar

Burka is usually spelled with k, and niq/kab is far from salient.

Maybe in French, where they like to outlaw various items of clothing?
Arindam Banerjee
2019-10-22 06:29:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dingbat
The letter Q is almost always followed by a U in English,
but that isn't always the case.
https://www.businessinsider.in/strategy/your-english-teacher-was-wrong-there-are-tons-of-words-that-have-a-q-but-no-u/articleshow/65955476.cms
Having two "always" in the sentence looks jarring.
The letter Q is usually followed by a U in English,
but that isn't always the case.
Words accepts qat and qi
Paul Carmichael
2019-10-22 08:38:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dingbat
The letter Q is almost always followed by a U in English,
but that isn't always the case.
https://www.businessinsider.in/strategy/your-english-teacher-was-wrong-there-are-tons-of-words-that-have-a-q-but-no-u/articleshow/65955476.cms
Having two "always" in the sentence looks jarring.
The letter Q is usually followed by a U in English,
but that isn't always the case.
What isn't always the case? That the q is usually followed by a u? I think you'll find
that is always the case.
--
Paul.

https://paulc.es/
https://asetrad.org
J. J. Lodder
2019-10-22 20:29:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dingbat
The letter Q is almost always followed by a U in English,
but that isn't always the case.
https://www.businessinsider.in/strategy/your-english-teacher-was-wrong-there-a
re-tons-of-words-that-have-a-q-but-no-u/articleshow/65955476.cms
Post by Dingbat
Having two "always" in the sentence looks jarring.
The letter Q is usually followed by a U in English,
but that isn't always the case.
Why kick in that open door again?

Apart from that it makes a silly point.
A good rule with a few exceptions is still a good rule,

Jan
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