Discussion:
How to word a headline?
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Dingbat
2020-01-12 03:56:13 UTC
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Please order these in order of most to least grammatic
... and most to least idiomatic.

1. UK investigates charity after its vigil for Soleimani
2. UK investigates charity upon its vigil for Soleimani
3. UK investigates charity for its vigil for Soleimani
4. UK charity's vigil for Soleimani prompts investigation

For a headline, the most idiomatic would tend to be preferred over
the most grammatic(ally correct), right?
b***@shaw.ca
2020-01-12 04:13:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dingbat
Please order these in order of most to least grammatic
... and most to least idiomatic.
1. UK investigates charity after its vigil for Soleimani
2. UK investigates charity upon its vigil for Soleimani
3. UK investigates charity for its vigil for Soleimani
4. UK charity's vigil for Soleimani prompts investigation
For a headline, the most idiomatic would tend to be preferred over
the most grammatic(ally correct), right?
Not necessarily. Different newspapers have widely varying approaches
to headlines. Your examples have small variations on a very
conservative theme. Imagine how a British tabloid might handle
this story.

UK PROBES VIGIL
FOR IRAN ARMY BOSS

might come closer to a tabloid headline, though it's still a bit wordy.

bill





bill
Katy Jennison
2020-01-12 08:47:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by b***@shaw.ca
Post by Dingbat
Please order these in order of most to least grammatic
... and most to least idiomatic.
1. UK investigates charity after its vigil for Soleimani
2. UK investigates charity upon its vigil for Soleimani
3. UK investigates charity for its vigil for Soleimani
4. UK charity's vigil for Soleimani prompts investigation
For a headline, the most idiomatic would tend to be preferred over
the most grammatic(ally correct), right?
Not necessarily. Different newspapers have widely varying approaches
to headlines. Your examples have small variations on a very
conservative theme. Imagine how a British tabloid might handle
this story.
UK PROBES VIGIL
FOR IRAN ARMY BOSS
might come closer to a tabloid headline, though it's still a bit wordy.
Suleimani Vigil: Charity Probed.

But that really tells the reader too much, and they won't need to click
on the story. A more effective teaser might be 'Suleimani Charity Vigil
Shock'.
--
Katy Jennison
CDB
2020-01-12 13:15:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by Katy Jennison
Post by b***@shaw.ca
Please order these in order of most to least grammatic ... and
most to least idiomatic.
1. UK investigates charity after its vigil for Soleimani 2. UK
investigates charity upon its vigil for Soleimani 3. UK
investigates charity for its vigil for Soleimani 4. UK charity's
vigil for Soleimani prompts investigation
For a headline, the most idiomatic would tend to be preferred
over the most grammatic(ally correct), right?
Not necessarily. Different newspapers have widely varying
approaches to headlines. Your examples have small variations on a
very conservative theme. Imagine how a British tabloid might
handle this story.
UK PROBES VIGIL FOR IRAN ARMY BOSS
might come closer to a tabloid headline, though it's still a bit wordy.
Suleimani Vigil: Charity Probed.
That's the one I like. You could even shorten it a bit further:

SULEIMANI VIGIL CHARITY PROBE .
Post by Katy Jennison
But that really tells the reader too much, and they won't need to
click on the story. A more effective teaser might be 'Suleimani
Charity Vigil Shock'.
True. They could save a veil or two for later. A headline over here
would need "UK", though, or "BRIT".
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2020-01-12 17:55:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by CDB
Post by Katy Jennison
Post by b***@shaw.ca
Please order these in order of most to least grammatic ... and
most to least idiomatic.
1. UK investigates charity after its vigil for Soleimani 2. UK
investigates charity upon its vigil for Soleimani 3. UK
investigates charity for its vigil for Soleimani 4. UK charity's
vigil for Soleimani prompts investigation
For a headline, the most idiomatic would tend to be preferred
over the most grammatic(ally correct), right?
Not necessarily. Different newspapers have widely varying
approaches to headlines. Your examples have small variations on a
very conservative theme. Imagine how a British tabloid might
handle this story.
UK PROBES VIGIL FOR IRAN ARMY BOSS
might come closer to a tabloid headline, though it's still a bit wordy.
Suleimani Vigil: Charity Probed.
SULEIMANI VIGIL CHARITY PROBE .
Post by Katy Jennison
But that really tells the reader too much, and they won't need to
click on the story. A more effective teaser might be 'Suleimani
Charity Vigil Shock'.
True. They could save a veil or two for later. A headline over here
would need "UK", though, or "BRIT".
Time to dig out Michael Frayn's The Tin Men and read it again.
--
athel
Pat Durkin
2020-01-12 05:30:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dingbat
Please order these in order of most to least grammatic
... and most to least idiomatic.
1. UK investigates charity after its vigil for Soleimani
2. UK investigates charity upon its vigil for Soleimani
3. UK investigates charity for its vigil for Soleimani
4. UK charity's vigil for Soleimani prompts investigation
For a headline, the most idiomatic would tend to be preferred over
the most grammatic(ally correct), right?
I like Bill's "probe". After that, I would suggest

UK Probes Charity's Solemani Vigil.
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