Discussion:
The Dumb and Dumber alt.sausage Question Thread
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bozo_de_niro@Yahoo.com
2018-11-12 02:18:44 UTC
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Why do they call it click Bait?
Mack A. Damia
2018-11-12 02:23:56 UTC
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Post by ***@Yahoo.com
Why do they call it click Bait?
Really?

The links are a "bait" because they take you to advertisements or
something similar.

When you "click" on the "bait" (link) you have been had.
bill van
2018-11-12 05:00:12 UTC
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Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by ***@Yahoo.com
Why do they call it click Bait?
Really?
The links are a "bait" because they take you to advertisements or
something similar.
When you "click" on the "bait" (link) you have been had.
It's worth noting that advertisers pay a website they advertise on based
on the number of clicks on the page that contains the ad. The more clicks,
the more money the site makes from advertisers. Therefore they place
teaser links, which some people call click bait, wherever they can so as
to attract clicks. Top 10 lists and celebrity scandals are hot click bait.

bill
Janet
2018-11-12 12:15:20 UTC
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Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by ***@Yahoo.com
Why do they call it click Bait?
Really?
The links are a "bait" because they take you to advertisements or
something similar.
When you "click" on the "bait" (link) you have been had.
You were just had by the bozo troll.

Janet.
Mack A. Damia
2018-11-12 16:15:12 UTC
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Post by Janet
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by ***@Yahoo.com
Why do they call it click Bait?
Really?
The links are a "bait" because they take you to advertisements or
something similar.
When you "click" on the "bait" (link) you have been had.
You were just had by the bozo troll.
"Trolling" is in the eyes of the beholder, cupcake.

Your denial of "fact" regarding offal is trolling.
h***@gmail.com
2018-11-12 16:26:08 UTC
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Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by Janet
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by ***@Yahoo.com
Why do they call it click Bait?
Really?
The links are a "bait" because they take you to advertisements or
something similar.
When you "click" on the "bait" (link) you have been had.
You were just had by the bozo troll.
"Trolling" is in the eyes of the beholder, cupcake.
Your denial of "fact" regarding offal is trolling.
I missed that particular learned discourse.

To me, "offal" is edible innards that aren't considered lean meat
or fatty meat. Offal is liver and kidney. Heart isn't offal, so
might be an "edible organ".
Mack A. Damia
2018-11-12 17:03:41 UTC
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Post by h***@gmail.com
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by Janet
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by ***@Yahoo.com
Why do they call it click Bait?
Really?
The links are a "bait" because they take you to advertisements or
something similar.
When you "click" on the "bait" (link) you have been had.
You were just had by the bozo troll.
"Trolling" is in the eyes of the beholder, cupcake.
Your denial of "fact" regarding offal is trolling.
I missed that particular learned discourse.
To me, "offal" is edible innards that aren't considered lean meat
or fatty meat. Offal is liver and kidney. Heart isn't offal, so
might be an "edible organ".
I know some people eat the tails of shrimp while most don't. Is that
offal? I don't think so.

Offal doesn't have to be "organ meat", and the word is not
specifically defined; it has cultural differences, too.

Re: "Particular learned discourse"

"Another British and Irish food is black pudding, consisting of
congealed pig's blood with oatmeal made into sausage-like links with
pig intestine as a casing, then boiled and usually fried on
preparation."

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Offal
h***@gmail.com
2018-11-12 18:54:35 UTC
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Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by h***@gmail.com
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by Janet
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by ***@Yahoo.com
Why do they call it click Bait?
Really?
The links are a "bait" because they take you to advertisements or
something similar.
When you "click" on the "bait" (link) you have been had.
You were just had by the bozo troll.
"Trolling" is in the eyes of the beholder, cupcake.
Your denial of "fact" regarding offal is trolling.
I missed that particular learned discourse.
To me, "offal" is edible innards that aren't considered lean meat
or fatty meat. Offal is liver and kidney. Heart isn't offal, so
might be an "edible organ".
I know some people eat the tails of shrimp while most don't. Is that
offal? I don't think so.
Offal doesn't have to be "organ meat", and the word is not
specifically defined; it has cultural differences, too.
Re: "Particular learned discourse"
"Another British and Irish food is black pudding, consisting of
congealed pig's blood with oatmeal made into sausage-like links with
pig intestine as a casing, then boiled and usually fried on
preparation."
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Offal
Not offal in my book. A prawn has 6 edible parts, including bits of
of its two heels - as a Swede once showed me. Don't get me started on
surströmming.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Surstr%C3%B6mming
h***@gmail.com
2018-11-12 19:10:20 UTC
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Post by h***@gmail.com
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by h***@gmail.com
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by Janet
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by ***@Yahoo.com
Why do they call it click Bait?
Really?
The links are a "bait" because they take you to advertisements or
something similar.
When you "click" on the "bait" (link) you have been had.
You were just had by the bozo troll.
"Trolling" is in the eyes of the beholder, cupcake.
Your denial of "fact" regarding offal is trolling.
I missed that particular learned discourse.
To me, "offal" is edible innards that aren't considered lean meat
or fatty meat. Offal is liver and kidney. Heart isn't offal, so
might be an "edible organ".
I know some people eat the tails of shrimp while most don't. Is that
offal? I don't think so.
Offal doesn't have to be "organ meat", and the word is not
specifically defined; it has cultural differences, too.
Re: "Particular learned discourse"
"Another British and Irish food is black pudding, consisting of
congealed pig's blood with oatmeal made into sausage-like links with
pig intestine as a casing, then boiled and usually fried on
preparation."
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Offal
Not offal in my book. A prawn has 6 edible parts, including bits of
of its two heels - as a Swede once showed me. Don't get me started on
surströmming.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Surstr%C3%B6mming
Surströmming is a canned fish "delicacy" that has such a disgusting
smell that it is illegal to open a can of it, except under controlled
conditions. Perhaps our AUE Nordic Dane can explain further.

If it looks like offal and it smells like offal, then it must be offal,
eh athel?
bozo_de_niro@Yahoo.com
2018-11-13 00:14:02 UTC
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Post by Janet
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by ***@Yahoo.com
Why do they call it click Bait?
Really?
The links are a "bait" because they take you to advertisements or
something similar.
When you "click" on the "bait" (link) you have been had.
You were just had by the bozo troll.
Janet.
I don't know if I'd characterize it as being "had" — but I do appreciate the drift and introduction to the word "offal", which I might use it with to diss somebody's name like Ofay if it were to consonate, alliterate or rhyme with it.
bozo_de_niro@Yahoo.com
2018-11-28 20:15:02 UTC
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Which newsgroup's got the most whack Jobs? … and without googling usage or spelling or Urban Dictionary, how do you know when an expression like whack job or newsgroup should be spelled with one or two Words?
RHDraney
2018-11-28 23:33:49 UTC
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Post by ***@Yahoo.com
Which newsgroup's got the most whack Jobs? … and without googling usage or spelling or Urban Dictionary, how do you know when an expression like whack job or newsgroup should be spelled with one or two Words?
To answer your first question, it's impossible to say...especially since
the most severe whack job cases crosspost all over the damn place, so
they can't be assigned to any particular newsgroup....

To answer your second question, why should one have to forego looking up
whether an expression is one word or two?...it seems to me you should be
willing to put in at least a little effort if you're trying to do the
right thing....r
Jerry Friedman
2018-11-29 04:27:21 UTC
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Post by ***@Yahoo.com
Which newsgroup's got the most whack Jobs? … and without googling usage or spelling or Urban Dictionary, how do you know when an expression like whack job or newsgroup should be spelled with one or two Words?
Wack-job or wack job, newsgroup. Pure intuition.
--
Jerry Friedman
Madrigal Gurneyhalt
2018-11-29 12:48:36 UTC
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Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by ***@Yahoo.com
Which newsgroup's got the most whack Jobs? … and without googling usage or spelling or Urban Dictionary, how do you know when an expression like whack job or newsgroup should be spelled with one or two Words?
Wack-job or wack job, newsgroup. Pure intuition.
Dictionaries appear to be split between "wack job" and "wackjob".
Haven't seen any hyphenated examples as yet.
bozo_de_niro@Yahoo.com
2019-01-06 02:16:20 UTC
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Can you teach the natural order of the universe to toddlers and preschoolers with just the cognitive & alliterative rule & moniker "Shit, Shower, and Shave"?


https://www.bing.com/images/search?view=detailV2&id=378AD475094652A89E7816F307DDC18A31A2AC9C&thid=OIP.HPOTu1U8cOM9Rrgab6ZLHwAAAA&exph=313&expw=250&q=shit%2c+shower%2c+and+shave&selectedindex=14&ajaxhist=0&vt=0&eim=1,2,6
bozo_de_niro@Yahoo.com
2019-01-11 02:17:15 UTC
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Why isn't uranus the center of the Universe?
Jack
2019-01-11 07:44:02 UTC
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Post by ***@Yahoo.com
Why isn't uranus the center of the Universe?
I'm not currently in u
J. J. Lodder
2019-01-11 20:06:31 UTC
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Post by ***@Yahoo.com
Why isn't uranus the center of the Universe?
Because your anus already is?

Jan
u***@swbell.net
2019-01-11 22:23:22 UTC
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Offal comes up here often enough that it should be added to sheep, food, and
English as an official topic. Whether a sub-category of food, or not, may
depend.
CDB
2019-01-12 13:23:49 UTC
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Post by u***@swbell.net
Offal comes up here often enough that it should be added to sheep,
food, and English as an official topic. Whether a sub-category of
food, or not, may depend.
Are you a off-Orff mergerer?
m***@att.net
2019-01-12 17:07:06 UTC
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No. I pronounce me rrrr’s.
CDB
2019-01-13 06:29:21 UTC
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Post by m***@att.net
No. I pronounce me rrrr’s.
Have you got Arindam's Syndrome? I'm guessing that's a response to "off
or Orrrrff".
Quinn C
2019-01-15 22:45:12 UTC
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Post by u***@swbell.net
Offal comes up here often enough that it should be added to sheep, food, and
English as an official topic.
Or shorter, an off'al topic.
--
Everyone gets one personality tic that's then expanded into an
entire character, in the same way that a balloon with a smiley
face will look like a person if at some point you just stop
caring. -- David Berry, NatPost (on the cast of Criminal Minds)
b***@gmail.com
2019-01-20 20:06:30 UTC
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And is it more East Indian or American Indian?
bozo_de_niro@Yahoo.com
2019-01-24 22:03:11 UTC
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What's an AIR HEAD? —— besides being a base secured in enemy territory where supplies and troops can be received and evacuated by air.
Madrigal Gurneyhalt
2019-01-24 23:17:35 UTC
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Post by ***@Yahoo.com
What's an AIR HEAD? —— besides being a base secured in enemy territory where supplies and troops can be received and evacuated by air.
Well gee, that is a hard one to work out ... for an airhead!
bozo_de_niro@Yahoo.com
2019-01-26 01:36:01 UTC
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https://www.foxnews.com/us/hawaiian-airlines-flight-diverted-after-flight-attendant-dies
bozo_de_niro@Yahoo.com
2019-02-07 13:23:44 UTC
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What does "I'm not getting any younger" Mean?
Madrigal Gurneyhalt
2019-02-07 14:02:51 UTC
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Post by ***@Yahoo.com
What does "I'm not getting any younger" Mean?
Memento mori.
Peter T. Daniels
2019-02-07 14:49:30 UTC
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Post by ***@Yahoo.com
What does "I'm not getting any younger" Mean?
Time flies. You cannot.
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2019-02-07 15:44:22 UTC
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On Thu, 7 Feb 2019 06:49:30 -0800 (PST), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by ***@Yahoo.com
What does "I'm not getting any younger" Mean?
Time flies. You cannot.
As the OED says:

"not getting (also growing) any younger" and variants: used to
express the inevitability of ageing or the passage of time, and
frequently as an incitement to action.
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
CDB
2019-02-07 14:57:35 UTC
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Post by ***@Yahoo.com
What does "I'm not getting any younger" Mean?
I'm getting older, and I can't bear to think about it.
bozo_de_niro@Yahoo.com
2019-02-16 05:58:03 UTC
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Why do you have to die to collect life Insurance?
Madrigal Gurneyhalt
2019-02-16 13:55:46 UTC
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Post by ***@Yahoo.com
Why do you have to die to collect life Insurance?
I'm pretty certain that dying actually prevents you from collecting it!
bill van
2019-02-16 20:17:45 UTC
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Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by ***@Yahoo.com
Why do you have to die to collect life Insurance?
I'm pretty certain that dying actually prevents you from collecting it!
Yes. bozo, who has a few gaps in his English and other things, does not
appear to know
that life insurance policies name beneficiaries -- typically, family members
of a wage earner -- who will collect the payout in the event of the
insured person's death.

Alternatively, bozo does not appear to think much, if at all, before posting.

bill
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2019-02-17 08:03:32 UTC
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Post by bill van
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by ***@Yahoo.com
Why do you have to die to collect life Insurance?
I'm pretty certain that dying actually prevents you from collecting it!
Yes. bozo, who has a few gaps
Only a few?
Post by bill van
in his English and other things, does not appear to know
that life insurance policies name beneficiaries -- typically, family members
of a wage earner -- who will collect the payout in the event of the
insured person's death.
Alternatively, bozo does not appear to think much, if at all, before posting.
Can anyone remember a useful post he has made?
--
athel
J. J. Lodder
2019-02-16 20:47:14 UTC
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Post by ***@Yahoo.com
Why do you have to die to collect life Insurance?
If you don't, some heavy flat-footed guys will come by
to collect you, for long term storage,

Jan
B***@37.com
2019-02-25 19:25:15 UTC
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What does "I Don't Get Around Much Anymore" mean?
RH Draney
2019-02-26 07:12:44 UTC
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Post by B***@37.com
What does "I Don't Get Around Much Anymore" mean?
Missed the Saturday dance?...r
B***@37.com
2019-02-26 19:10:23 UTC
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...the more they remain the same" Mean?
Joseph C. Fineman
2019-02-26 20:06:00 UTC
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Post by B***@37.com
...the more they remain the same" Mean?
It means that successive efforts at changing the state of the world have
all failed.
--
--- Joe Fineman ***@verizon.net

||: Be sloppy enough that a surprise can happen, and careful :||
||: enough that you can tell what it was. :||
Peter T. Daniels
2019-02-26 21:19:49 UTC
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Post by Joseph C. Fineman
Post by B***@37.com
...the more they remain the same" Mean?
It means that successive efforts at changing the state of the world have
all failed.
In 1976, the Chicago Linguistic Society had a "Parasession" on Historical
Syntax. In those days, the parasessions were substantial events and published
as a separate volume in the Proceedings. The two previous ones had been given
punny titles, but my suggestion for this one wasn't accepted: "Plus c,a change,
plus c'est la me^me cause." It appeared alongside CLS 10 as "Parasession on
Historical Syntax*.
CDB
2019-02-27 14:04:32 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Joseph C. Fineman
Post by B***@37.com
...the more they remain the same" Mean?
It means that successive efforts at changing the state of the world
have all failed.
In 1976, the Chicago Linguistic Society had a "Parasession" on
Historical Syntax. In those days, the parasessions were substantial
events and published as a separate volume in the Proceedings. The two
previous ones had been given punny titles, but my suggestion for this
one wasn't accepted: "Plus c,a change, plus c'est la me^me cause." It
appeared alongside CLS 10 as "Parasession on Historical Syntax*.
I have sometimes wondered how it came into English that way. Around
here, at least, I have never heard a francophone say anything but "plus
ça change, plus c'est pareil".
Jerry Friedman
2019-02-27 15:09:06 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Joseph C. Fineman
Post by B***@37.com
...the more they remain the same" Mean?
It means that successive efforts at changing the state of the world
have all failed.
In 1976, the Chicago Linguistic Society had a "Parasession" on
Historical Syntax. In those days, the parasessions were substantial
events and published as a separate volume in the Proceedings. The two
previous ones had been given punny titles, but my suggestion for this
one wasn't accepted: "Plus c,a change, plus c'est la me^me cause." It
appeared alongside CLS 10 as "Parasession on Historical Syntax*.
I have sometimes wondered how it came into English that way.  Around
here, at least, I have never heard a francophone say anything but "plus
ça change, plus c'est pareil".
"Plus ça change, plus c'est la même chose" seems to be the original
quotation from Alphonse Karr. This version is from 1853.

https://books.google.com/books?id=N69gs81YbbYC&pg=RA1-PA295
--
Jerry Friedman
Peter T. Daniels
2019-02-27 15:16:11 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Joseph C. Fineman
Post by B***@37.com
...the more they remain the same" Mean?
It means that successive efforts at changing the state of the world
have all failed.
In 1976, the Chicago Linguistic Society had a "Parasession" on
Historical Syntax. In those days, the parasessions were substantial
events and published as a separate volume in the Proceedings. The two
previous ones had been given punny titles, but my suggestion for this
one wasn't accepted: "Plus ça change, plus c'est la même cause." It
appeared alongside CLS 10 as "Parasession on Historical Syntax*.
I have sometimes wondered how it came into English that way.  Around
here, at least, I have never heard a francophone say anything but "plus
ça change, plus c'est pareil".
"Plus ça change, plus c'est la même chose" seems to be the original
quotation from Alphonse Karr. This version is from 1853.
https://books.google.com/books?id=N69gs81YbbYC&pg=RA1-PA295
To explain for those who are unfortunately not entirely up on their French,
"cause" created the perfect pun: it refers to both 'cause' and 'speech'.
CDB
2019-02-27 16:54:39 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by CDB
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Joseph C. Fineman
Post by B***@37.com
...the more they remain the same" Mean?
It means that successive efforts at changing the state of
the world have all failed.
In 1976, the Chicago Linguistic Society had a "Parasession" on
Historical Syntax. In those days, the parasessions were
substantial events and published as a separate volume in the
Proceedings. The two previous ones had been given punny
titles, but my suggestion for this one wasn't accepted: "Plus
ça change, plus c'est la même cause." It appeared alongside CLS
10 as "Parasession on Historical Syntax*.
I have sometimes wondered how it came into English that way.
Around here, at least, I have never heard a francophone say
anything but "plus ça change, plus c'est pareil".
"Plus ça change, plus c'est la même chose" seems to be the original
quotation from Alphonse Karr. This version is from 1853.
https://books.google.com/books?id=N69gs81YbbYC&pg=RA1-PA295
To explain for those who are unfortunately not entirely up on their
French, "cause" created the perfect pun: it refers to both 'cause'
and 'speech'.
But "cause" as a noun doesn't, AFAICS, have anything to do with speech.
What if you had suggested "Plus ça change, plus c'est la même
causerie"? Less punch, perhaps, but closer to the mark.
Peter T. Daniels
2019-02-27 20:34:21 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by CDB
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by CDB
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Joseph C. Fineman
Post by B***@37.com
...the more they remain the same" Mean?
It means that successive efforts at changing the state of
the world have all failed.
In 1976, the Chicago Linguistic Society had a "Parasession" on
Historical Syntax. In those days, the parasessions were
substantial events and published as a separate volume in the
Proceedings. The two previous ones had been given punny
titles, but my suggestion for this one wasn't accepted: "Plus
ça change, plus c'est la même cause." It appeared alongside CLS
10 as "Parasession on Historical Syntax*.
I have sometimes wondered how it came into English that way.
Around here, at least, I have never heard a francophone say
anything but "plus ça change, plus c'est pareil".
"Plus ça change, plus c'est la même chose" seems to be the original
quotation from Alphonse Karr. This version is from 1853.
https://books.google.com/books?id=N69gs81YbbYC&pg=RA1-PA295
To explain for those who are unfortunately not entirely up on their
French, "cause" created the perfect pun: it refers to both 'cause'
and 'speech'.
But "cause" as a noun doesn't, AFAICS, have anything to do with speech.
What if you had suggested "Plus ça change, plus c'est la même
causerie"? Less punch, perhaps, but closer to the mark.
je cause, tu causes, il cause; it's also 'cause' as in "just cause,"
and 'legal case'. "Causerie" 'a chat' doesn't fit.
CDB
2019-02-28 13:58:44 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by CDB
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by CDB
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Joseph C. Fineman
Post by B***@37.com
...the more they remain the same" Mean?
It means that successive efforts at changing the state
of the world have all failed.
In 1976, the Chicago Linguistic Society had a "Parasession"
on Historical Syntax. In those days, the parasessions were
substantial events and published as a separate volume in
the Proceedings. The two previous ones had been given punny
"Plus ça change, plus c'est la même cause." It appeared
alongside CLS 10 as "Parasession on Historical Syntax*.
I have sometimes wondered how it came into English that way.
Around here, at least, I have never heard a francophone say
anything but "plus ça change, plus c'est pareil".
"Plus ça change, plus c'est la même chose" seems to be the
original quotation from Alphonse Karr. This version is from
1853.
https://books.google.com/books?id=N69gs81YbbYC&pg=RA1-PA295
To explain for those who are unfortunately not entirely up on
their French, "cause" created the perfect pun: it refers to both
'cause' and 'speech'.
But "cause" as a noun doesn't, AFAICS, have anything to do with
speech. What if you had suggested "Plus ça change, plus c'est la
même causerie"? Less punch, perhaps, but closer to the mark.
je cause, tu causes, il cause; it's also 'cause' as in "just cause,"
and 'legal case'. "Causerie" 'a chat' doesn't fit.
But it's the closest thing to "cause" that can be thought of as a noun,
AFAICT.

You know, that thing at the far end of "la même chose".

Anglophones, even those thoroughly up on their French, may not notice
that that language is fussier and more formal than English about
grammatical categories.

And don't try to tell them that "faith" is a verb. Je fois!
--
Mon foie?
Peter T. Daniels
2019-02-28 15:58:21 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by CDB
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by CDB
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by CDB
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Joseph C. Fineman
Post by B***@37.com
...the more they remain the same" Mean?
It means that successive efforts at changing the state
of the world have all failed.
In 1976, the Chicago Linguistic Society had a "Parasession"
on Historical Syntax. In those days, the parasessions were
substantial events and published as a separate volume in
the Proceedings. The two previous ones had been given punny
"Plus ça change, plus c'est la même cause." It appeared
alongside CLS 10 as "Parasession on Historical Syntax*.
I have sometimes wondered how it came into English that way.
Around here, at least, I have never heard a francophone say
anything but "plus ça change, plus c'est pareil".
"Plus ça change, plus c'est la même chose" seems to be the
original quotation from Alphonse Karr. This version is from
1853.
https://books.google.com/books?id=N69gs81YbbYC&pg=RA1-PA295
To explain for those who are unfortunately not entirely up on
their French, "cause" created the perfect pun: it refers to both
'cause' and 'speech'.
But "cause" as a noun doesn't, AFAICS, have anything to do with
speech. What if you had suggested "Plus ça change, plus c'est la
même causerie"? Less punch, perhaps, but closer to the mark.
je cause, tu causes, il cause; it's also 'cause' as in "just cause,"
and 'legal case'. "Causerie" 'a chat' doesn't fit.
But it's the closest thing to "cause" that can be thought of as a noun,
AFAICT.
You know, that thing at the far end of "la même chose".
'The more things change [i.e., changes in syntax over time], the more it's
the same cause'. The "causer" connection is an extra added bonus.
Post by CDB
Anglophones, even those thoroughly up on their French, may not notice
that that language is fussier and more formal than English about
grammatical categories.
And don't try to tell them that "faith" is a verb. Je fois!
--
Mon foie?
Peter Moylan
2019-02-28 21:52:55 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by CDB
Anglophones, even those thoroughly up on their French, may not notice
that that language is fussier and more formal than English about
grammatical categories.
And don't try to tell them that "faith" is a verb. Je fois!
--
Mon foie?
Q: Is faith worth having?
A: That depends on the liver.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
CDB
2019-03-01 14:33:23 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by CDB
Anglophones, even those thoroughly up on their French, may not
notice that that language is fussier and more formal than English
about grammatical categories.
And don't try to tell them that "faith" is a verb. Je fois!
-- Mon foie?
Q: Is faith worth having? A: That depends on the liver.
It could be dire.
David Kleinecke
2019-02-28 23:35:24 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Thursday, February 28, 2019 at 5:58:52 AM UTC-8, CDB wrote:

<snip>
Post by CDB
And don't try to tell them that "faith" is a verb.
My third-favorite atheist blogger uses Jesus as a verb. As in
The Baptist's solution is to urge all their members
to Jesus harder.
(not her sentence - I made it up in her style).
CDB
2019-03-01 14:26:28 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by David Kleinecke
<snip>
Post by CDB
And don't try to tell them that "faith" is a verb.
My third-favorite atheist blogger uses Jesus as a verb. As in
The Baptist's solution is to urge all their members
to Jesus harder.
(not her sentence - I made it up in her style).
Drop-kick me now.
Peter T. Daniels
2019-03-01 15:21:48 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by CDB
Post by David Kleinecke
Post by CDB
And don't try to tell them that "faith" is a verb.
My third-favorite atheist blogger uses Jesus as a verb. As in
The Baptist's solution is to urge all their members
to Jesus harder.
(not her sentence - I made it up in her style).
Drop-kick me now.
That would be Roman Catholic -- at Notre Dame's football stadium, there's
a giant mosaic of "touchdown Jesus" -- making the arm signal for a
touchdown -- on the side of the building just beyond the home team's
goalposts outside the stadium (library? chapel?). They think of it as
a blessing gesture, but the football fans know why it's there.
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2019-03-03 16:48:24 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by CDB
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by CDB
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Joseph C. Fineman
Post by B***@37.com
...the more they remain the same" Mean?
It means that successive efforts at changing the state
of the world have all failed.
In 1976, the Chicago Linguistic Society had a "Parasession"
on Historical Syntax. In those days, the parasessions were
substantial events and published as a separate volume in
the Proceedings. The two previous ones had been given punny
"Plus ça change, plus c'est la même cause." It appeared
alongside CLS 10 as "Parasession on Historical Syntax*.
I have sometimes wondered how it came into English that way. Around
here, at least, I have never heard a francophone say anything but "plus
ça change, plus c'est pareil".
"Plus ça change, plus c'est la même chose" seems to be the original
quotation from Alphonse Karr. This version is from 1853.
https://books.google.com/books?id=N69gs81YbbYC&pg=RA1-PA295
To explain for those who are unfortunately not entirely up on their
French, "cause" created the perfect pun: it refers to both
'cause' and 'speech'.
But "cause" as a noun doesn't, AFAICS, have anything to do with speech.
What if you had suggested "Plus ça change, plus c'est la même
causerie"? Less punch, perhaps, but closer to the mark.
je cause, tu causes, il cause; it's also 'cause' as in "just cause,"
and 'legal case'. "Causerie" 'a chat' doesn't fit.
But it's the closest thing to "cause" that can be thought of as a noun,
AFAICT.
You know, that thing at the far end of "la même chose".
Anglophones, even those thoroughly up on their French, may not notice
that that language is fussier and more formal than English about
grammatical categories.
And don't try to tell them that "faith" is a verb. Je fois!
Avec Carrefour, je positive.
--
athel
CDB
2019-03-03 17:35:51 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by CDB
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by CDB
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by CDB
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Joseph C. Fineman
Post by B***@37.com
...the more they remain the same" Mean?
It means that successive efforts at changing the
state of the world have all failed.
In 1976, the Chicago Linguistic Society had a
"Parasession" on Historical Syntax. In those days, the
parasessions were substantial events and published as a
separate volume in the Proceedings. The two previous
ones had been given punny titles, but my suggestion for
this one wasn't accepted: "Plus ça change, plus c'est
la même cause." It appeared alongside CLS 10 as
"Parasession on Historical Syntax*.
I have sometimes wondered how it came into English that
way. Around here, at least, I have never heard a
francophone say anything but "plus ça change, plus c'est
pareil".
"Plus ça change, plus c'est la même chose" seems to be the
original quotation from Alphonse Karr. This version is
from 1853.
https://books.google.com/books?id=N69gs81YbbYC&pg=RA1-PA295
To explain for those who are unfortunately not entirely up on their
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by CDB
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by CDB
Post by Peter T. Daniels
French, "cause" created the perfect pun: it refers to both
'cause' and 'speech'.
But "cause" as a noun doesn't, AFAICS, have anything to do with
speech. What if you had suggested "Plus ça change, plus c'est
la même causerie"? Less punch, perhaps, but closer to the
mark.
je cause, tu causes, il cause; it's also 'cause' as in "just
cause," and 'legal case'. "Causerie" 'a chat' doesn't fit.
But it's the closest thing to "cause" that can be thought of as a
noun, AFAICT.
You know, that thing at the far end of "la même chose".
Anglophones, even those thoroughly up on their French, may not
notice that that language is fussier and more formal than English
about grammatical categories.
And don't try to tell them that "faith" is a verb. Je fois!
Avec Carrefour, je positive.
<shudder> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carrefour#French_slogans
--
The advantages of living with two cultures strike one at every turn:
there is a medical centre for old folks not far from my house called
"Care For".
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2019-03-03 18:02:04 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by CDB
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by CDB
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by CDB
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Joseph C. Fineman
Post by B***@37.com
...the more they remain the same" Mean?
It means that successive efforts at changing the
state of the world have all failed.
In 1976, the Chicago Linguistic Society had a
"Parasession" on Historical Syntax. In those days, the
parasessions were substantial events and published as a
separate volume in the Proceedings. The two previous
ones had been given punny titles, but my suggestion for
this one wasn't accepted: "Plus ça change, plus c'est
la même cause." It appeared alongside CLS 10 as
"Parasession on Historical Syntax*.
I have sometimes wondered how it came into English that
way. Around here, at least, I have never heard a
francophone say anything but "plus ça change, plus c'est
pareil".
"Plus ça change, plus c'est la même chose" seems to be the
original quotation from Alphonse Karr. This version is
from 1853.
https://books.google.com/books?id=N69gs81YbbYC&pg=RA1-PA295
To explain for those who are unfortunately not entirely up on their
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by CDB
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by CDB
French, "cause" created the perfect pun: it refers to both 'cause' and
'speech'.
But "cause" as a noun doesn't, AFAICS, have anything to do with
speech. What if you had suggested "Plus ça change, plus c'est
la même causerie"? Less punch, perhaps, but closer to the
mark.
je cause, tu causes, il cause; it's also 'cause' as in "just
cause," and 'legal case'. "Causerie" 'a chat' doesn't fit.
But it's the closest thing to "cause" that can be thought of as a
noun, AFAICT.
You know, that thing at the far end of "la même chose".
Anglophones, even those thoroughly up on their French, may not
notice that that language is fussier and more formal than English
about grammatical categories.
And don't try to tell them that "faith" is a verb. Je fois!
Avec Carrefour, je positive.
<shudder> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carrefour#French_slogans
A lot of people shuddered over that one. The more recent one (Avec
Carrefour, j'optimisme) seems to have been little used.
--
athel
Sam Plusnet
2019-03-03 19:18:45 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by CDB
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by CDB
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by CDB
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Joseph C. Fineman
Post by B***@37.com
...the more they remain the same" Mean?
It means that successive efforts at changing the
state of the world have all failed.
In 1976, the Chicago Linguistic Society had a
"Parasession" on Historical Syntax. In those days, the
parasessions were substantial events and published as a
separate volume in the Proceedings. The two previous
ones had been given punny titles, but my suggestion for
this one wasn't accepted: "Plus ça change, plus c'est
la même cause." It appeared alongside CLS 10 as
"Parasession on Historical Syntax*.
I have sometimes wondered how it came into English that
way. Around here, at least, I have never heard a
francophone say anything but "plus ça change, plus c'est
pareil".
"Plus ça change, plus c'est la même chose" seems to be the
original quotation from Alphonse Karr.  This version is
from 1853.
https://books.google.com/books?id=N69gs81YbbYC&pg=RA1-PA295
To explain for those who are unfortunately not entirely up on their
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by CDB
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by CDB
Post by Peter T. Daniels
French, "cause" created the perfect pun: it refers to both
'cause' and 'speech'.
But "cause" as a noun doesn't, AFAICS, have anything to do with
speech. What if you had suggested "Plus ça change, plus c'est
la même causerie"?  Less punch, perhaps, but closer to the
mark.
je cause, tu causes, il cause; it's also 'cause' as in "just
cause," and 'legal case'. "Causerie" 'a chat' doesn't fit.
But it's the closest thing to "cause" that can be thought of as a
noun, AFAICT.
You know, that thing at the far end of "la même chose".
Anglophones, even those thoroughly up on their French,  may not
notice that that language is fussier and more formal than English
about grammatical categories.
And don't try to tell them that "faith" is a verb. Je fois!
Avec Carrefour, je positive.
<shudder>  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carrefour#French_slogans
A lot of people shuddered over that one. The more recent one (Avec
Carrefour, j'optimisme) seems to have been little used.
I wonder if they were upset that someone else used

"Because I'm worth it"

before they could adopt it?
--
Sam Plusnet
CDB
2019-02-27 16:53:37 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Joseph C. Fineman
Post by B***@37.com
...the more they remain the same" Mean?
It means that successive efforts at changing the state of the
world have all failed.
In 1976, the Chicago Linguistic Society had a "Parasession" on
Historical Syntax. In those days, the parasessions were
substantial events and published as a separate volume in the
Proceedings. The two previous ones had been given punny titles,
but my suggestion for this one wasn't accepted: "Plus c,a
change, plus c'est la me^me cause." It appeared alongside CLS 10
as "Parasession on Historical Syntax*.
I have sometimes wondered how it came into English that way. Around
here, at least, I have never heard a francophone say anything but
"plus ça change, plus c'est pareil".
"Plus ça change, plus c'est la même chose" seems to be the original
quotation from Alphonse Karr. This version is from 1853.
https://books.google.com/books?id=N69gs81YbbYC&pg=RA1-PA295
Well, that would be how, then. He must have been pleased with it: Wp
dates his first use to 1849.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jean-Baptiste_Alphonse_Karr
B***@37.com
2019-02-28 19:10:19 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by CDB
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Joseph C. Fineman
Post by B***@37.com
...the more they remain the same" Mean?
It means that successive efforts at changing the state of the
world have all failed.
In 1976, the Chicago Linguistic Society had a "Parasession" on
Historical Syntax. In those days, the parasessions were
substantial events and published as a separate volume in the
Proceedings. The two previous ones had been given punny titles,
but my suggestion for this one wasn't accepted: "Plus c,a
change, plus c'est la me^me cause." It appeared alongside CLS 10
as "Parasession on Historical Syntax*.
I have sometimes wondered how it came into English that way. Around
here, at least, I have never heard a francophone say anything but
"plus ça change, plus c'est pareil".
"Plus ça change, plus c'est la même chose" seems to be the original
quotation from Alphonse Karr. This version is from 1853.
https://books.google.com/books?id=N69gs81YbbYC&pg=RA1-PA295
Well, that would be how, then. He must have been pleased with it: Wp
dates his first use to 1849.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jean-Baptiste_Alphonse_Karr
Thanks for citing that: He also said on the proposal to abolish capital punishment, "je veux bien que messieurs les assassins commencent"[3]—"let the gentlemen who do the murders take the first step".
Dr. HotSalt
2019-02-26 21:36:24 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by ***@Yahoo.com
Why do they call it click Bait?
Because people like you exist.

On the other hand, you just clickbaited 20 people in this group.

Uh, 21. Never mind.


Dr. HotSalt
B***@37.com
2019-02-26 21:54:49 UTC
Reply
Permalink
...how come they never named a bar for it?
B***@37.com
2019-03-01 10:39:10 UTC
Reply
Permalink
What's a Chemical Bank?
Peter T. Daniels
2019-03-01 13:24:58 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by B***@37.com
What's a Chemical Bank?
Nothing. It was taken over by Chase decades ago.
Ken Blake
2019-03-01 15:52:30 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by B***@37.com
What's a Chemical Bank?
It's not *a* Chemical Bank; it's *the* Chemical Bank. "Chemical" is
simply the name of the bank.

A Google search would have told you that in less time than it took you
to type "What's a Chemical Bank?"
John Dunlop
2019-03-01 16:09:55 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Ken Blake
A Google search would have told you that in less time than it took you
to type "What's a Chemical Bank?"
Google Implants?
--
John
B***@37.com
2019-03-01 19:34:24 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Ken Blake
Post by B***@37.com
What's a Chemical Bank?
It's not *a* Chemical Bank; it's *the* Chemical Bank. "Chemical" is
simply the name of the bank.
A Google search would have told you that in less time than it took you
to type "What's a Chemical bank?"
No. It wouldn't. Googling chemical bank (upper case or lower) would yield no more disambiguation than googling Physical Bank (upper case or lower).
B***@37.com
2019-03-01 19:52:39 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by B***@37.com
Post by Ken Blake
Post by B***@37.com
What's a Chemical Bank?
It's not *a* Chemical Bank; it's *the* Chemical Bank. "Chemical" is
simply the name of the bank.
A Google search would have told you that in less time than it took you
to type "What's a Chemical bank?"
No. It wouldn't. Googling chemical bank (upper case or lower) would yield no more disambiguation than googling Physical Bank (upper case or lower).
Well, yes, maybe it would, if it were prefixed with "The" (but this Chemical Bank wasn't).
Peter Moylan
2019-03-02 01:36:31 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Ken Blake
Post by B***@37.com
What's a Chemical Bank?
It's not *a* Chemical Bank; it's *the* Chemical Bank. "Chemical" is
simply the name of the bank.
A Google search would have told you that in less time than it took you
to type "What's a Chemical Bank?"
Google also has an answer for "What's a bozo?"
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2019-03-01 17:45:04 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by B***@37.com
What's a Chemical Bank?
As others have said it was "The Chemical Bank".

As Wikip says, it got the word Chemical in its name because it was
originally a division of the New York Chemical Manufacturing Company.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chemical_Bank#Founding_and_early_history
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
John Varela
2019-03-03 02:08:23 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Fri, 1 Mar 2019 17:45:04 UTC, "Peter Duncanson [BrE]"
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by B***@37.com
What's a Chemical Bank?
As others have said it was "The Chemical Bank".
As Wikip says, it got the word Chemical in its name because it was
originally a division of the New York Chemical Manufacturing Company.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chemical_Bank#Founding_and_early_history
That's sort of like the Chemical Rubber Handbook. (Before posting
this, I googled to see if it still exists. It's in its 99th
edition. My copy is the 38th edition. I suppose the integral
tables and LaPlace transforms haven't changed much.)
--
John Varela
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2019-03-03 09:42:52 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by John Varela
On Fri, 1 Mar 2019 17:45:04 UTC, "Peter Duncanson [BrE]"
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by B***@37.com
What's a Chemical Bank?
As others have said it was "The Chemical Bank".
As Wikip says, it got the word Chemical in its name because it was
originally a division of the New York Chemical Manufacturing Company.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chemical_Bank#Founding_and_early_history
That's sort of like the Chemical Rubber Handbook. (Before posting
this, I googled to see if it still exists. It's in its 99th
edition. My copy is the 38th edition. I suppose the integral
tables and LaPlace transforms haven't changed much.)
They went years ago. I bought it in Berkeley in about 1974 (I don't
know which edition it is, because it's in my office and I'm not). I
used the mathematical tables more than anything else, especially for
integrals, but when it was falling apart I refrained from replacing it
because I saw that the mathematical tables were no longer included.
--
athel
Lewis
2019-03-03 16:51:58 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by John Varela
On Fri, 1 Mar 2019 17:45:04 UTC, "Peter Duncanson [BrE]"
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by B***@37.com
What's a Chemical Bank?
As others have said it was "The Chemical Bank".
As Wikip says, it got the word Chemical in its name because it was
originally a division of the New York Chemical Manufacturing Company.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chemical_Bank#Founding_and_early_history
That's sort of like the Chemical Rubber Handbook. (Before posting
this, I googled to see if it still exists. It's in its 99th
edition. My copy is the 38th edition. I suppose the integral
tables and LaPlace transforms haven't changed much.)
They went years ago. I bought it in Berkeley in about 1974 (I don't
know which edition it is, because it's in my office and I'm not). I
used the mathematical tables more than anything else, especially for
integrals, but when it was falling apart I refrained from replacing it
because I saw that the mathematical tables were no longer included.
Mathematical tables are not nearly as useful nor as accurate as any
generic calculator with scientific function on it. Or, of course, you
can simply type the entire function into google.
--
"You never really understand a person until you see things from his
point of view, until you climb inside of his skin and walk around in
it."
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2019-03-03 17:24:15 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Lewis
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by John Varela
On Fri, 1 Mar 2019 17:45:04 UTC, "Peter Duncanson [BrE]"
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by B***@37.com
What's a Chemical Bank?
As others have said it was "The Chemical Bank".
As Wikip says, it got the word Chemical in its name because it was
originally a division of the New York Chemical Manufacturing Company.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chemical_Bank#Founding_and_early_history
That's sort of like the Chemical Rubber Handbook. (Before posting
this, I googled to see if it still exists. It's in its 99th
edition. My copy is the 38th edition. I suppose the integral
tables and LaPlace transforms haven't changed much.)
They went years ago. I bought it in Berkeley in about 1974 (I don't
know which edition it is, because it's in my office and I'm not). I
used the mathematical tables more than anything else, especially for
integrals, but when it was falling apart I refrained from replacing it
because I saw that the mathematical tables were no longer included.
Mathematical tables are not nearly as useful nor as accurate as any
generic calculator with scientific function on it. Or, of course, you
can simply type the entire function into google.
In 1974?
--
athel
Peter Moylan
2019-03-04 00:29:37 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Lewis
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by John Varela
On Fri, 1 Mar 2019 17:45:04 UTC, "Peter Duncanson [BrE]"
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by B***@37.com
What's a Chemical Bank?
As others have said it was "The Chemical Bank".
As Wikip says, it got the word Chemical in its name because it
was originally a division of the New York Chemical
Manufacturing Company.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chemical_Bank#Founding_and_early_history
That's sort of like the Chemical Rubber Handbook. (Before posting
Post by Lewis
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by John Varela
this, I googled to see if it still exists. It's in its 99th
edition. My copy is the 38th edition. I suppose the integral
tables and LaPlace transforms haven't changed much.)
They went years ago. I bought it in Berkeley in about 1974 (I don't
know which edition it is, because it's in my office and I'm not). I
used the mathematical tables more than anything else, especially
for integrals, but when it was falling apart I refrained from
replacing it because I saw that the mathematical tables were no
longer included.
Mathematical tables are not nearly as useful nor as accurate as any
generic calculator with scientific function on it. Or, of course, you
can simply type the entire function into google.
It would have to be a pretty good calculator to do algebra. Most of them
can only do arithmetic.

I have often needed a "simplify" function that will take a long
complicated algebraic expression and reduce it to a simpler form. There
is software that can do that, but I've never seen it in a calculator.

Ah, but I see what you mean about Google. I've just tried "integral cos
x dx" and it pointed me to a web site with a table of integrals. I guess
that's as good as having a table of integrals in a printed handbook.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
RH Draney
2019-03-04 07:41:42 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
Ah, but I see what you mean about Google. I've just tried "integral cos
x dx" and it pointed me to a web site with a table of integrals. I guess
that's as good as having a table of integrals in a printed handbook.
All the ones that were in my CRC Handbook appear to be collected in
Wikipedia....r
John Varela
2019-03-03 17:07:57 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sun, 3 Mar 2019 09:42:52 UTC, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by John Varela
On Fri, 1 Mar 2019 17:45:04 UTC, "Peter Duncanson [BrE]"
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by B***@37.com
What's a Chemical Bank?
As others have said it was "The Chemical Bank".
As Wikip says, it got the word Chemical in its name because it was
originally a division of the New York Chemical Manufacturing Company.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chemical_Bank#Founding_and_early_history
That's sort of like the Chemical Rubber Handbook. (Before posting
this, I googled to see if it still exists. It's in its 99th
edition. My copy is the 38th edition. I suppose the integral
tables and LaPlace transforms haven't changed much.)
They went years ago. I bought it in Berkeley in about 1974 (I don't
know which edition it is, because it's in my office and I'm not). I
used the mathematical tables more than anything else, especially for
integrals, but when it was falling apart I refrained from replacing it
because I saw that the mathematical tables were no longer included.
Then I guess I'd better hang onto mine, too.
--
John Varela
Peter Moylan
2019-03-04 00:35:52 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by John Varela
On Sun, 3 Mar 2019 09:42:52 UTC, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
They went years ago. I bought it in Berkeley in about 1974 (I don't
know which edition it is, because it's in my office and I'm not). I
used the mathematical tables more than anything else, especially
for integrals, but when it was falling apart I refrained from
replacing it because I saw that the mathematical tables were no
longer included.
Then I guess I'd better hang onto mine, too.
I'm still hanging on to my "Four-figure mathematical tables" (1958).
Mostly for sentimental reasons, because I haven't used them for years. I
have even less use for the steam tables of a similar vintage.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Jerry Friedman
2019-03-03 22:53:40 UTC
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Post by John Varela
On Fri, 1 Mar 2019 17:45:04 UTC, "Peter Duncanson [BrE]"
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by B***@37.com
What's a Chemical Bank?
As others have said it was "The Chemical Bank".
As Wikip says, it got the word Chemical in its name because it was
originally a division of the New York Chemical Manufacturing Company.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chemical_Bank#Founding_and_early_history
That's sort of like the Chemical Rubber Handbook.  (Before posting
this, I googled to see if it still exists.  It's in its 99th
edition.  My copy is the 38th edition.  I suppose the integral
tables and LaPlace transforms haven't changed much.)
They went years ago. I bought it in Berkeley in about 1974 (I don't know
which edition it is, because it's in my office and I'm not). I used the
mathematical tables more than anything else, especially for integrals,
but when it was falling apart I refrained from replacing it because I
saw that the mathematical tables were no longer included.
By that time wasn't there a separate "Rubber Bible" for mathematical
tables and such?
--
Jerry Friedman
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2019-03-04 08:43:38 UTC
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Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by John Varela
On Fri, 1 Mar 2019 17:45:04 UTC, "Peter Duncanson [BrE]"
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by B***@37.com
What's a Chemical Bank?
As others have said it was "The Chemical Bank".
As Wikip says, it got the word Chemical in its name because it was
originally a division of the New York Chemical Manufacturing Company.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chemical_Bank#Founding_and_early_history
That's sort of like the Chemical Rubber Handbook.  (Before posting
this, I googled to see if it still exists.  It's in its 99th
edition.  My copy is the 38th edition.  I suppose the integral
tables and LaPlace transforms haven't changed much.)
They went years ago. I bought it in Berkeley in about 1974 (I don't
know which edition it is, because it's in my office and I'm not). I
used the mathematical tables more than anything else, especially for
integrals, but when it was falling apart I refrained from replacing it
because I saw that the mathematical tables were no longer included.
By that time wasn't there a separate "Rubber Bible" for mathematical
tables and such?
Yes, but I didn't buy it.
--
athel
B***@37.com
2019-03-01 17:45:23 UTC
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What does measure once and cut twice mean?
Ken Blake
2019-03-01 18:07:38 UTC
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Post by B***@37.com
What does measure once and cut twice mean?
It means "be very careful." Before you cut something, be very sure
you're cutting to the correct size. You can measure again, but once
you cut, you're stuck with where you cut it.
Peter T. Daniels
2019-03-01 18:24:30 UTC
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Post by Ken Blake
Post by B***@37.com
What does measure once and cut twice mean?
It means "be very careful." Before you cut something, be very sure
you're cutting to the correct size. You can measure again, but once
you cut, you're stuck with where you cut it.
No, actually, it doesn't. Blake gave the interpretation of the old saying.

What bozo wrote is the opposite of the old saying.
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2019-03-01 19:08:28 UTC
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On Fri, 1 Mar 2019 10:24:30 -0800 (PST), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Ken Blake
Post by B***@37.com
What does measure once and cut twice mean?
It means "be very careful." Before you cut something, be very sure
you're cutting to the correct size. You can measure again, but once
you cut, you're stuck with where you cut it.
No, actually, it doesn't. Blake gave the interpretation of the old saying.
What bozo wrote is the opposite of the old saying.
That may have been a mistake.
The old saying is explained here:
https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/measure_twice_and_cut_once
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
RH Draney
2019-03-02 07:36:21 UTC
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Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Fri, 1 Mar 2019 10:24:30 -0800 (PST), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Ken Blake
Post by B***@37.com
What does measure once and cut twice mean?
It means "be very careful." Before you cut something, be very sure
you're cutting to the correct size. You can measure again, but once
you cut, you're stuck with where you cut it.
No, actually, it doesn't. Blake gave the interpretation of the old saying.
What bozo wrote is the opposite of the old saying.
That may have been a mistake.
https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/measure_twice_and_cut_once
So it's half of one, six dozen of the other....r
musika
2019-03-01 18:42:15 UTC
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Post by Ken Blake
Post by B***@37.com
What does measure once and cut twice mean?
It means "be very careful." Before you cut something, be very sure
you're cutting to the correct size. You can measure again, but once
you cut, you're stuck with where you cut it.
Nope. That's a description of "measure twice and cut once".
--
Ray
UK
Ken Blake
2019-03-01 19:24:52 UTC
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Post by musika
Post by Ken Blake
Post by B***@37.com
What does measure once and cut twice mean?
It means "be very careful." Before you cut something, be very sure
you're cutting to the correct size. You can measure again, but once
you cut, you're stuck with where you cut it.
Nope. That's a description of "measure twice and cut once".
Oops! You're right, of course. I didn't read what he wrote carefully
enough, and just assumed that he meant the standard sentence.

But I've never seen "measure once and cut twice" before." I wonder if
he mistakenly typed it backwards.
Sam Plusnet
2019-03-01 18:51:29 UTC
Reply
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Post by Ken Blake
Post by B***@37.com
What does measure once and cut twice mean?
It means "be very careful." Before you cut something, be very sure
you're cutting to the correct size. You can measure again, but once
you cut, you're stuck with where you cut it.
I think it means
"Read the name of the poster. If bozo, pass on to the next post."
--
Sam Plusnet
Ken Blake
2019-03-01 19:25:28 UTC
Reply
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Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Ken Blake
Post by B***@37.com
What does measure once and cut twice mean?
It means "be very careful." Before you cut something, be very sure
you're cutting to the correct size. You can measure again, but once
you cut, you're stuck with where you cut it.
I think it means
"Read the name of the poster. If bozo, pass on to the next post."
LOL!
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2019-03-01 19:57:10 UTC
Reply
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Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Ken Blake
Post by B***@37.com
What does measure once and cut twice mean?
It means "be very careful." Before you cut something, be very sure
you're cutting to the correct size. You can measure again, but once
you cut, you're stuck with where you cut it.
I think it means
"Read the name of the poster. If bozo, pass on to the next post."
+1
--
athel
Janet
2019-03-02 14:15:21 UTC
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Post by Sam Plusnet
I think it means
"Read the name of the poster. If bozo, pass on to the next post."
+1


Janet.
charles
2019-03-01 19:18:37 UTC
Reply
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Post by Ken Blake
Post by B***@37.com
What does measure once and cut twice mean?
It means "be very careful." Before you cut something, be very sure
you're cutting to the correct size. You can measure again, but once
you cut, you're stuck with where you cut it.
the proper expression is "measure twice & cut once"
--
from KT24 in Surrey, England
"I'd rather die of exhaustion than die of boredom" Thomas Carlyle
RH Draney
2019-03-02 07:36:59 UTC
Reply
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Post by charles
Post by Ken Blake
Post by B***@37.com
What does measure once and cut twice mean?
It means "be very careful." Before you cut something, be very sure
you're cutting to the correct size. You can measure again, but once
you cut, you're stuck with where you cut it.
the proper expression is "measure twice & cut once"
There is also: "measure with a micrometer, mark with chalk, cut with an
axe"....r
J. J. Lodder
2019-03-02 10:01:22 UTC
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Post by RH Draney
Post by charles
Post by Ken Blake
Post by B***@37.com
What does measure once and cut twice mean?
It means "be very careful." Before you cut something, be very sure
you're cutting to the correct size. You can measure again, but once
you cut, you're stuck with where you cut it.
the proper expression is "measure twice & cut once"
There is also: "measure with a micrometer, mark with chalk, cut with an
axe"....r
And while we are at it:
"It is important always to use the right tool."
"If it doesn't fit, use a bigger hammer."

Jan
HVS
2019-03-03 11:48:15 UTC
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Post by Ken Blake
Post by B***@37.com
What does measure once and cut twice mean?
It means "be very careful." Before you cut something, be very sure
you're cutting to the correct size. You can measure again, but once
you cut, you're stuck with where you cut it.
Isn't that what "measure *twice* and cut *once* means, rather than w
what he's posted?

I've heard the reverse/wrong version characterised as "Damn. I cut it
twice and it's *still* too short".
Ken Blake
2019-03-03 16:14:19 UTC
Reply
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On Sun, 03 Mar 2019 11:48:15 +0000, HVS
Post by HVS
Post by Ken Blake
Post by B***@37.com
What does measure once and cut twice mean?
It means "be very careful." Before you cut something, be very sure
you're cutting to the correct size. You can measure again, but once
you cut, you're stuck with where you cut it.
Isn't that what "measure *twice* and cut *once* means, rather than w
what he's posted?
Yes. As I said in an earlier message, "I didn't read what he wrote
carefully enough, and just assumed that he meant the standard
sentence."
HVS
2019-03-03 17:40:51 UTC
Reply
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Post by Ken Blake
On Sun, 03 Mar 2019 11:48:15 +0000, HVS
Post by HVS
Post by Ken Blake
Post by B***@37.com
What does measure once and cut twice mean?
It means "be very careful." Before you cut something, be very sure
you're cutting to the correct size. You can measure again, but once
you cut, you're stuck with where you cut it.
Isn't that what "measure *twice* and cut *once* means, rather than w
what he's posted?
carefully enough, and just assumed that he meant the standard
sentence."
Sorry; I should'a read ahead....
--
Cheers, Harvey
CanEng (30yrs) and BrEng (34yrs), indiscriminately mixed
Ken Blake
2019-03-03 21:00:03 UTC
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Post by HVS
Post by Ken Blake
On Sun, 03 Mar 2019 11:48:15 +0000, HVS
Post by HVS
Post by Ken Blake
Post by B***@37.com
What does measure once and cut twice mean?
It means "be very careful." Before you cut something, be very sure
you're cutting to the correct size. You can measure again, but once
you cut, you're stuck with where you cut it.
Isn't that what "measure *twice* and cut *once* means, rather than w
what he's posted?
carefully enough, and just assumed that he meant the standard
sentence."
Sorry; I should'a read ahead....
No big deal, and no need to apologize. I often make similar mistakes.
Kerr-Mudd,John
2019-03-04 07:17:32 UTC
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[]
Post by Ken Blake
Post by HVS
Post by Ken Blake
carefully enough, and just assumed that he meant the standard
sentence."
Sorry; I should'a read ahead....
No big deal, and no need to apologize. I often make similar mistakes.
Hey, only wusses apologis(z)e in this NG! Googles for "PTD apology".

Ah; He can use the word:

Peter T. Daniels

10/06/2005

- show quoted text -
There is no apology, because there is nothing to apologize for. See
below.

- show quoted text -
--
Bah, and indeed, Humbug.
B***@37.com
2019-03-03 02:51:26 UTC
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...and takes a dump and it doesn't Flush?
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