Discussion:
What is "tree-polliing"? (Crime-related)
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l***@yahoo.com
2019-10-31 19:03:44 UTC
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From "Curious Punishments of Bygone Days" (1896) by Alice Morse Earle:


"It would be impossible to enumerate the offences for which Englishmen were pilloried: among them were treason, sedition, arson, blasphemy,witch-craft, perjury, wife-beating, cheating, forestalling, forging, coin-clipping, tree-polling, gaming, dice-cogging, quarrelling, lying, libelling, slandering, threatening, conjuring, fortune-telling,'prigging,' drunkenness, impudence. One man was set in the pillory for delivering false dinner invitations; another for a rough practical joke."


I DID find out that "prigging" means picking a pocket.

But no luck on the other one.

Any idea?



Lenona.
Peter T. Daniels
2019-10-31 20:02:23 UTC
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Post by l***@yahoo.com
"It would be impossible to enumerate the offences for which Englishmen were pilloried: among them were treason, sedition, arson, blasphemy,witch-craft, perjury, wife-beating, cheating, forestalling, forging, coin-clipping, tree-polling, gaming, dice-cogging, quarrelling, lying, libelling, slandering, threatening, conjuring, fortune-telling,'prigging,' drunkenness, impudence. One man was set in the pillory for delivering false dinner invitations; another for a rough practical joke."
I DID find out that "prigging" means picking a pocket.
But no luck on the other one.
Any idea?
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pollarding#Origin_and_usage_of_term

Found by googling "tree-polling."
l***@yahoo.com
2019-10-31 21:13:15 UTC
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Actually, I did google earlier, but it took me until now to figure out what might be illegal about pruning a tree. (Wikipedia didn't make this clear.)

Namely, stealing wood from someone else's property!

Or am I inferring incorrectly?
Janet
2019-10-31 22:37:43 UTC
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Post by l***@yahoo.com
"It would be impossible to enumerate the offences for which Englishmen were pilloried: among them were treason, sedition, arson, blasphemy,witch-craft, perjury, wife-beating, cheating, forestalling, forging, coin-clipping, tree-polling, gaming, dice-cogging, quarrelling, lying, libelling, slandering, threatening, conjuring, fortune-telling,'prigging,' drunkenness, impudence. One man was set in the pillory for delivering false dinner invitations; another for a rough
practical joke."
Post by l***@yahoo.com
I DID find out that "prigging" means picking a pocket.
But no luck on the other one.
Any idea?
http://www.victorianweb.org/history/work/22.html

scroll down for picture of


" Preparing or polling the willow (men's work). Right: Osier Peeling
(men and women's work). [Click on these images to enlarge them.]

The polling, which we have portrayed in our illustration, takes place
about every seventh year, the middle of the winter being the time of the
year most proper for this operation. The trees, when they have thus had
their branches lopped off, are termed pollards. By many people they are
considered at all times unpicturesque? a view we personally do not
share. On the contrary, they seem to us to harmonise perfectly with the
gentle current of the Thames, its lazy barges, and smooth, low-lying
meadows."

Polled willows provided a very valuable crop, the harvest took years
to regrow so stealing it was an offence.

In my riverside childhood in rural Herefordshire, the local willows
had been pollarded for a century or so; the top of the trunks were
like a nest that several children could fit in.

Janet
s***@gmail.com
2019-11-01 07:09:32 UTC
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Post by l***@yahoo.com
Post by l***@yahoo.com
"It would be impossible to enumerate the offences for which Englishmen were pilloried: among them were treason, sedition, arson, blasphemy,witch-craft, perjury, wife-beating, cheating, forestalling, forging, coin-clipping, tree-polling, gaming, dice-cogging, quarrelling, lying, libelling, slandering, threatening, conjuring, fortune-telling,'prigging,' drunkenness, impudence. One man was set in the pillory for delivering false dinner invitations; another for a rough
practical joke."
Post by l***@yahoo.com
I DID find out that "prigging" means picking a pocket.
But no luck on the other one.
Any idea?
http://www.victorianweb.org/history/work/22.html
scroll down for picture of
" Preparing or polling the willow (men's work). Right: Osier Peeling
(men and women's work). [Click on these images to enlarge them.]
The polling, which we have portrayed in our illustration, takes place
about every seventh year, the middle of the winter being the time of the
year most proper for this operation. The trees, when they have thus had
their branches lopped off, are termed pollards. By many people they are
considered at all times unpicturesque? a view we personally do not
share. On the contrary, they seem to us to harmonise perfectly with the
gentle current of the Thames, its lazy barges, and smooth, low-lying
meadows."
Polled willows provided a very valuable crop, the harvest took years
to regrow so stealing it was an offence.
In my riverside childhood in rural Herefordshire, the local willows
had been pollarded for a century or so; the top of the trunks were
like a nest that several children could fit in.
An interesting article, but tricky for us furriners
to pick the OCR errors from the local lingo.

/dps
J. J. Lodder
2019-11-01 10:37:49 UTC
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Janet <***@somewhere.com> wrote:
[-]
Post by Janet
" Preparing or polling the willow (men's work). Right: Osier Peeling
(men and women's work). [Click on these images to enlarge them.]
The polling, which we have portrayed in our illustration, takes place
about every seventh year, the middle of the winter being the time of the
year most proper for this operation. The trees, when they have thus had
their branches lopped off, are termed pollards. By many people they are
considered at all times unpicturesque? a view we personally do not
share. On the contrary, they seem to us to harmonise perfectly with the
gentle current of the Thames, its lazy barges, and smooth, low-lying
meadows."
Polled willows provided a very valuable crop, the harvest took years
to regrow so stealing it was an offence.
And nowadays it's just the opposite.
Old willows became almost a threatened species,
because, if neglected, they will overgrow and topple.
They generally grow in soft soil that can't support too much weight.
So lots of volunteers do it in weekends nowadays,
with some help from a few professionals.
Post by Janet
In my riverside childhood in rural Herefordshire, the local willows
had been pollarded for a century or so; the top of the trunks were
like a nest that several children could fit in.
Polled willows are also much appreciated by Little Owls,
for the nesting opportunities,

Jan
Sam Plusnet
2019-11-01 19:20:28 UTC
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Post by J. J. Lodder
And nowadays it's just the opposite.
Old willows became almost a threatened species,
because, if neglected, they will overgrow and topple.
But it is the easiest tree to propagate.
Cut a whip from the tree, stab the cut end into softish ground.
It will grow.
--
Sam Plusnet
Kerr-Mudd,John
2019-11-01 20:38:10 UTC
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Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by J. J. Lodder
And nowadays it's just the opposite.
Old willows became almost a threatened species,
because, if neglected, they will overgrow and topple.
But it is the easiest tree to propagate.
Cut a whip from the tree, stab the cut end into softish ground.
It will grow.
A neighbour had some logs for his woodburner; stored in a nook (out of
the sun) they started sprouting!
--
Bah, and indeed, Humbug.
Peter Young
2019-11-01 21:43:38 UTC
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Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by J. J. Lodder
And nowadays it's just the opposite.
Old willows became almost a threatened species,
because, if neglected, they will overgrow and topple.
But it is the easiest tree to propagate.
Cut a whip from the tree, stab the cut end into softish ground.
It will grow.
A neighbour had some logs for his woodburner; stored in a nook (out of
the sun) they started sprouting!
On Crickley Hill near here, which is run as a country park, there was
planted a fence made of woven hazel branches. They sprouted too, and were
replaced by a dry-stone wall, which didn't sprout.

Peter.
--
Peter Young, (BrE, RP), Consultant Anaesthetist, 1975-2004.
(US equivalent: Certified Anesthesiologist) (AUE Hg)
Cheltenham and Gloucester, UK. Now happily retired.
http://pnyoung.orpheusweb.co.uk
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2019-11-02 09:04:23 UTC
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Post by Peter Young
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by J. J. Lodder
And nowadays it's just the opposite.
Old willows became almost a threatened species,
because, if neglected, they will overgrow and topple.
But it is the easiest tree to propagate.
Cut a whip from the tree, stab the cut end into softish ground.
It will grow.
A neighbour had some logs for his woodburner; stored in a nook (out of
the sun) they started sprouting!
On Crickley Hill near here, which is run as a country park, there was
planted a fence made of woven hazel branches. They sprouted too, and were
replaced by a dry-stone wall, which didn't sprout.
Which is regarded as better?
--
athel
Peter Young
2019-11-02 15:31:35 UTC
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Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Peter Young
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by J. J. Lodder
And nowadays it's just the opposite.
Old willows became almost a threatened species,
because, if neglected, they will overgrow and topple.
But it is the easiest tree to propagate.
Cut a whip from the tree, stab the cut end into softish ground.
It will grow.
A neighbour had some logs for his woodburner; stored in a nook (out of
the sun) they started sprouting!
On Crickley Hill near here, which is run as a country park, there was
planted a fence made of woven hazel branches. They sprouted too, and were
replaced by a dry-stone wall, which didn't sprout.
Which is regarded as better?
The leafy hazel was attractive, but the dry-stone is expected to last a
lot longer.

Peter.
--
Peter Young, (BrE, RP), Consultant Anaesthetist, 1975-2004.
(US equivalent: Certified Anesthesiologist) (AUE Hg)
Cheltenham and Gloucester, UK. Now happily retired.
http://pnyoung.orpheusweb.co.uk
Richard Heathfield
2019-11-02 19:55:52 UTC
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<snip>
Post by Peter Young
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
A neighbour had some logs for his woodburner; stored in a nook (out of
the sun) they started sprouting!
On Crickley Hill near here, which is run as a country park, there was
planted a fence made of woven hazel branches. They sprouted too, and were
replaced by a dry-stone wall, which didn't sprout.
Give it time. Patience is a virtue.
--
Richard Heathfield
Email: rjh at cpax dot org dot uk
"Usenet is a strange place" - dmr 29 July 1999
Sig line 4 vacant - apply within
Kerr-Mudd,John
2019-11-02 20:35:39 UTC
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Post by Richard Heathfield
<snip>
Post by Peter Young
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
A neighbour had some logs for his woodburner; stored in a nook (out
of the sun) they started sprouting!
On Crickley Hill near here, which is run as a country park, there was
planted a fence made of woven hazel branches. They sprouted too, and
were replaced by a dry-stone wall, which didn't sprout.
Give it time. Patience is a virtue.
You can all sorts of interesting life on/in a DSW.
(see Gerald Durrell's early life)
--
Bah, and indeed, Humbug.
Jerry Friedman
2019-11-02 20:55:45 UTC
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Post by Richard Heathfield
<snip>
Post by Peter Young
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
A neighbour had some logs for his woodburner; stored in a nook (out of
the sun) they started sprouting!
On Crickley Hill near here, which is run as a country park, there was
planted a fence made of woven hazel branches. They sprouted too, and were
replaced by a dry-stone wall, which didn't sprout.
Give it time. Patience is a virtue.
Hi, Richard!
--
Jerry Friedman
Richard Heathfield
2019-11-03 01:54:15 UTC
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Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Richard Heathfield
<snip>
Post by Peter Young
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
A neighbour had some logs for his woodburner; stored in a nook (out of
the sun) they started sprouting!
On Crickley Hill near here, which is run as a country park, there was
planted a fence made of woven hazel branches. They sprouted too, and were
replaced by a dry-stone wall, which didn't sprout.
Give it time. Patience is a virtue.
Hi, Richard!
Wotcha!

I blame my somewhat prolonged absence on whoever it was that mentioned
the Canadian pronouns thing about two years ago. Twitter is a time sink.
--
Richard Heathfield
Email: rjh at cpax dot org dot uk
"Usenet is a strange place" - dmr 29 July 1999
Sig line 4 vacant - apply within
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2019-11-03 08:12:11 UTC
Reply
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Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Richard Heathfield
<snip>
Post by Peter Young
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
A neighbour had some logs for his woodburner; stored in a nook (out of
the sun) they started sprouting!
On Crickley Hill near here, which is run as a country park, there was
planted a fence made of woven hazel branches. They sprouted too, and were
replaced by a dry-stone wall, which didn't sprout.
Give it time. Patience is a virtue.
Hi, Richard!
Yes. Long time no see.
--
athel
J. J. Lodder
2019-11-02 21:01:49 UTC
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Post by Richard Heathfield
<snip>
Post by Peter Young
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
A neighbour had some logs for his woodburner; stored in a nook (out of
the sun) they started sprouting!
On Crickley Hill near here, which is run as a country park, there was
planted a fence made of woven hazel branches. They sprouted too, and were
replaced by a dry-stone wall, which didn't sprout.
Give it time. Patience is a virtue.
They must have failed to water it,

Jan
Sam Plusnet
2019-11-03 02:17:07 UTC
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Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by Richard Heathfield
<snip>
Post by Peter Young
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
A neighbour had some logs for his woodburner; stored in a nook (out of
the sun) they started sprouting!
On Crickley Hill near here, which is run as a country park, there was
planted a fence made of woven hazel branches. They sprouted too, and were
replaced by a dry-stone wall, which didn't sprout.
Give it time. Patience is a virtue.
They must have failed to water it,
<topical note>
Watering really isn't necessary.

P.S. As it is on a hill, it probably isn't underwater today.
--
Sam Plusnet
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2019-11-03 08:14:18 UTC
Reply
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Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by Richard Heathfield
<snip>
Post by Peter Young
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
A neighbour had some logs for his woodburner; stored in a nook (out of
the sun) they started sprouting!
On Crickley Hill near here, which is run as a country park, there was
planted a fence made of woven hazel branches. They sprouted too, and were
replaced by a dry-stone wall, which didn't sprout.
Give it time. Patience is a virtue.
They must have failed to water it,
<topical note>
Watering really isn't necessary.
P.S. As it is on a hill, it probably isn't underwater today.
Lots of flooding today from Amélie. Near the airport there was a metre
of water in someone's garage. Nothing special here, however.
--
athel
Peter Moylan
2019-11-03 03:57:53 UTC
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Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by Richard Heathfield
<snip>
Post by Peter Young
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
A neighbour had some logs for his woodburner; stored in a nook (out of
the sun) they started sprouting!
On Crickley Hill near here, which is run as a country park, there was
planted a fence made of woven hazel branches. They sprouted too, and were
replaced by a dry-stone wall, which didn't sprout.
Give it time. Patience is a virtue.
They must have failed to water it,
There are hints in the Bible that watering a wall is not a good thing to do.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
CDB
2019-11-03 11:14:15 UTC
Reply
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Post by Peter Moylan
Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by Richard Heathfield
<snip>
Post by Peter Young
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
A neighbour had some logs for his woodburner; stored in a
nook
(out of
Post by Peter Young
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
the sun) they started sprouting!
On Crickley Hill near here, which is run as a country park,
there was planted a fence made of woven hazel branches. They
sprouted too,
and were
Post by Peter Young
replaced by a dry-stone wall, which didn't sprout.
Give it time. Patience is a virtue.
They must have failed to water it,
There are hints in the Bible that watering a wall is not a good thing to do.
But no walls are injured in the making of this water.
Sam Plusnet
2019-11-03 19:20:46 UTC
Reply
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Post by CDB
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by Richard Heathfield
<snip>
Post by Peter Young
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
A neighbour had some logs for his woodburner; stored in a
nook
(out of
Post by Peter Young
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
the sun) they started sprouting!
On Crickley Hill near here, which is run as a country park,
there was planted a fence made of woven hazel branches. They
sprouted too,
and were
Post by Peter Young
replaced by a dry-stone wall, which didn't sprout.
Give it time. Patience is a virtue.
They must have failed to water it,
There are hints in the Bible that watering a wall is not a good thing to do.
But no walls are injured in the making of this water.
You probably didn't get any blood either.
--
Sam Plusnet
J. J. Lodder
2019-11-01 21:42:43 UTC
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Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by J. J. Lodder
And nowadays it's just the opposite.
Old willows became almost a threatened species,
because, if neglected, they will overgrow and topple.
But it is the easiest tree to propagate.
Cut a whip from the tree, stab the cut end into softish ground.
It will grow.
Sure, the willow isn't a threatened species at all,
but it will take decades and a lot of work until it looks like this,
<https://www.vangoghmuseum.nl/nl/collectie/d1172S2012?v=1>

Jan
occam
2019-11-01 08:27:22 UTC
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Post by l***@yahoo.com
"It would be impossible to enumerate the offences for which Englishmen were pilloried: among them were treason, sedition, arson, blasphemy,witch-craft, perjury, wife-beating, cheating, forestalling, forging, coin-clipping, tree-polling, gaming, dice-cogging, quarrelling, lying, libelling, slandering, threatening, conjuring, fortune-telling,'prigging,' drunkenness, impudence. One man was set in the pillory for delivering false dinner invitations; another for a rough practical joke."
I DID find out that "prigging" means picking a pocket.
But no luck on the other one.
I was also stumped by 'forestalling'. Isn't filibustering a legal
delaying tactic in the UK Parliament?
Peter Moylan
2019-11-01 09:52:05 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by occam
Post by l***@yahoo.com
"It would be impossible to enumerate the offences for which
Englishmen were pilloried: among them were treason, sedition,
arson, blasphemy,witch-craft, perjury, wife-beating, cheating,
forestalling, forging, coin-clipping, tree-polling, gaming,
dice-cogging, quarrelling, lying, libelling, slandering,
threatening, conjuring, fortune-telling,'prigging,' drunkenness,
impudence. One man was set in the pillory for delivering false
dinner invitations; another for a rough practical joke."
I DID find out that "prigging" means picking a pocket.
But no luck on the other one.
I was also stumped by 'forestalling'. Isn't filibustering a legal
delaying tactic in the UK Parliament?
Maybe alling a forest is another kind of tree-polling.

In answer to your main question: I see from Wikipedia that filibustering
is possible in many (but not all) jurisdictions, but in practice its use
appears to be so rare that the few examples have become memorable.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
occam
2019-11-01 10:25:35 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by occam
Post by l***@yahoo.com
"It would be impossible to enumerate the offences for which
Englishmen were pilloried: among them were treason, sedition,
arson, blasphemy,witch-craft, perjury, wife-beating, cheating,
forestalling, forging, coin-clipping, tree-polling, gaming,
dice-cogging, quarrelling, lying, libelling, slandering,
threatening, conjuring, fortune-telling,'prigging,' drunkenness,
impudence. One man was set in the pillory for delivering false
dinner invitations; another for a rough practical joke."
I DID find out that "prigging" means picking a pocket.
But no luck on the other one.
I was also stumped by 'forestalling'. Isn't filibustering a legal
delaying tactic in the UK Parliament?
Maybe alling a forest is another kind of tree-polling.
In answer to your main question: I see from Wikipedia that filibustering
is possible in many (but not all) jurisdictions, but in practice its use
appears to be so rare that the few examples have become memorable.
Not so rare. I think in the US it is as common today as it ever was.

----
It is very easy to sabotage an ordinary congressional hearing

In the typical hearing, members of Congress each spend five minutes —
and only five minutes — questioning a witness or panel of witnesses.
Question time ordinarily alternates between Democrats and Republicans.

This process generates a number of easily foreseeable problems. It is
inevitable that some members will be more effective than others, but the
five-minute rule allows witnesses to filibuster particularly effective
questioners until that member’s time runs out. The five-minute rule also
means that members do not have enough time to conduct deep, probing
inquiries or to ask a long series of follow-up questions that could
uncover answers a witness would rather keep hidden.
----

Source:
"https://www.vox.com/2019/10/31/20941811/most-important-democrats-impeachment-resolution
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2019-11-01 10:36:33 UTC
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Permalink
Post by occam
Post by l***@yahoo.com
"It would be impossible to enumerate the offences for which Englishmen were pilloried: among them were treason, sedition, arson, blasphemy,witch-craft, perjury, wife-beating, cheating, forestalling, forging, coin-clipping, tree-polling, gaming, dice-cogging, quarrelling, lying, libelling, slandering, threatening, conjuring, fortune-telling,'prigging,' drunkenness, impudence. One man was set in the pillory for delivering false dinner invitations; another for a rough practical joke."
I DID find out that "prigging" means picking a pocket.
But no luck on the other one.
I was also stumped by 'forestalling'. Isn't filibustering a legal
delaying tactic in the UK Parliament?
Yes, but...

There is the process known as a "Closure Motion".
https://www.parliament.uk/site-information/glossary/closure-motion/

A closure motion is a proposal that the Commons or Lords should stop
debating and make a decision on the matter being discussed. It may
be moved at any time during proceedings.

https://beta.parliament.uk/articles/tg3UWM89

A closure motion is a way of ‘jumping ahead’ one step in the current
proceedings. The most common type of closure motion (the ‘ordinary’
closure) is used when a debate is in progress. If it’s agreed, the
debate ends immediately and the Speaker puts the question on the
matter under discussion and asks the House to make a decision on it.

Closure motions are mostly commonly used during Opposition day
debates and on Private Members’ Bill Fridays. They’re used to try to
get a decision on a motion that would lapse without a decision if an
MP were still talking when the debate was due to end.

<snip details>
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2019-11-01 11:06:54 UTC
Reply
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Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by occam
Post by l***@yahoo.com
"It would be impossible to enumerate the offences for which Englishmen
were pilloried: among them were treason, sedition, arson,
blasphemy,witch-craft, perjury, wife-beating, cheating, forestalling,
forging, coin-clipping, tree-polling, gaming, dice-cogging,
quarrelling, lying, libelling, slandering, threatening, conjuring,
fortune-telling,'prigging,' drunkenness, impudence. One man was set in
the pillory for delivering false dinner invitations; another for a
rough practical joke.">>>>>> I DID find out that "prigging" means
picking a pocket.
But no luck on the other one.
I was also stumped by 'forestalling'. Isn't filibustering a legal
delaying tactic in the UK Parliament?
Yes, but...
There is the process known as a "Closure Motion".
https://www.parliament.uk/site-information/glossary/closure-motion/
A closure motion is a proposal that the Commons or Lords should stop
debating and make a decision on the matter being discussed. It may
be moved at any time during proceedings.
https://beta.parliament.uk/articles/tg3UWM89
A closure motion is a way of ‘jumping ahead’ one step in the current
proceedings. The most common type of closure motion (the ‘ordinary’
closure) is used when a debate is in progress. If it’s agreed, the
debate ends immediately and the Speaker puts the question on the
matter under discussion and asks the House to make a decision on it.
Closure motions are mostly commonly used during Opposition day
debates and on Private Members’ Bill Fridays. They’re used to try to
get a decision on a motion that would lapse without a decision if an
MP were still talking when the debate was due to end.
<snip details>
I was surprised to see wife-beating there. I though good Christians
approved of that, and eveb recommended it.
--
athel
Jerry Friedman
2019-11-01 14:08:38 UTC
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Post by occam
Post by l***@yahoo.com
"It would be impossible to enumerate the offences for which Englishmen were pilloried: among them were treason, sedition, arson, blasphemy,witch-craft, perjury, wife-beating, cheating, forestalling, forging, coin-clipping, tree-polling, gaming, dice-cogging, quarrelling, lying, libelling, slandering, threatening, conjuring, fortune-telling,'prigging,' drunkenness, impudence. One man was set in the pillory for delivering false dinner invitations; another for a rough practical joke."
I DID find out that "prigging" means picking a pocket.
But no luck on the other one.
I was also stumped by 'forestalling'.
...

The OED says

2. a. To intercept (goods, etc.) before they reach the public markets;
to buy (them) up privately with a view to enhance the price: in former
days an indictable offence. /Obsolete/ exc. /Historical./
--
Jerry Friedman
Jerry Friedman
2019-11-01 18:46:15 UTC
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"...One man was set in the pillory for ... a rough practical joke."
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Just the pillory?
--
Jerry Friedman
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