Discussion:
back from
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tonbei
2018-10-07 13:06:52 UTC
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Permalink
re: back from

I have a question about the following sentences from a novel.

-------------------
"Can you get you anything to drink, Kay? I have some very good whisky I bootlegged back from Ireland last month. I know you like Irish whisky."
--------------------------------

context: Governor's wife jokingly asked someone who was visiting the official residence.
question: about "back from", specifically about usage of "back" here
What overtone is added with "back"?
Peter T. Daniels
2018-10-07 13:17:16 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by tonbei
re: back from
I have a question about the following sentences from a novel.
-------------------
"Can you get you anything to drink, Kay? I have some very good whisky I bootlegged back from Ireland last month. I know you like Irish whisky."
--------------------------------
context: Governor's wife jokingly asked someone who was visiting the official residence.
question: about "back from", specifically about usage of "back" here
What overtone is added with "back"?
Presumably it says "Can I get you ..."

The "back" is part of a compound preposition, "back from," or if you
prefer a spatial adverbial.

"Bootleg" is used transitively (a bit unusual), and conceptualized as a
process that has a direction (i.e. from Ireland to wherever the speaker is).
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2018-10-07 17:22:05 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sun, 7 Oct 2018 06:17:16 -0700 (PDT), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by tonbei
re: back from
I have a question about the following sentences from a novel.
-------------------
"Can you get you anything to drink, Kay? I have some very good whisky I bootlegged back from Ireland last month. I know you like Irish whisky."
--------------------------------
context: Governor's wife jokingly asked someone who was visiting the official residence.
question: about "back from", specifically about usage of "back" here
What overtone is added with "back"?
Presumably it says "Can I get you ..."
The "back" is part of a compound preposition, "back from," or if you
prefer a spatial adverbial.
"Bootleg" is used transitively (a bit unusual), and conceptualized as a
process that has a direction (i.e. from Ireland to wherever the speaker is).
OED:

bootleg, v.

1. transitive. To traffic illicitly in (liquor). Also in extended
use.

"Trafficking" can involve transportation of whatever is being
trafficked.

For instance "Human Trafficking":
https://www.unodc.org/unodc/en/human-trafficking/what-is-human-trafficking.html

What is Human Trafficking?

Article 3, paragraph (a) of the Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and
Punish Trafficking in Persons defines Trafficking in Persons as the
-> recruitment, transportation, transfer, harbouring or receipt of
persons, by means of the threat or use of force or other forms of
coercion, of abduction, of fraud, of deception, of the abuse of
power or of a position of vulnerability or of the giving or
receiving of payments or benefits to achieve the consent of a person
having control over another person, for the purpose of exploitation.
Exploitation shall include, at a minimum, the exploitation of the
prostitution of others or other forms of sexual exploitation, forced
labour or services, slavery or practices similar to slavery,
servitude or the removal of organs
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
tonbei
2018-10-07 14:05:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by tonbei
-------------------
"Can you get you anything to drink, Kay? I have some very good whisky I bootlegged back from Ireland last month. I know you like Irish whisky."
--------------------------------
So, I'd like to ask a question a little differently.

1) I got very good whisky from Ireland.
2) I got very good whisky back from Ireland.

How are 1) and 2) different in meaning?
Peter T. Daniels
2018-10-07 14:20:55 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by tonbei
Post by tonbei
-------------------
"Can you get you anything to drink, Kay? I have some very good whisky I bootlegged back from Ireland last month. I know you like Irish whisky."
--------------------------------
So, I'd like to ask a question a little differently.
1) I got very good whisky from Ireland.
2) I got very good whisky back from Ireland.
How are 1) and 2) different in meaning?
You sent something to Ireland, and in return you got good whisky back.
Tony Cooper
2018-10-07 14:35:33 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by tonbei
Post by tonbei
-------------------
"Can you get you anything to drink, Kay? I have some very good whisky I bootlegged back from Ireland last month. I know you like Irish whisky."
--------------------------------
So, I'd like to ask a question a little differently.
1) I got very good whisky from Ireland.
2) I got very good whisky back from Ireland.
How are 1) and 2) different in meaning?
Your new questions don't relate to your first question.

In the book quote, the person is referring to whisky [SIC] brought
back from a trip to Ireland. The "bootlegged" reference is either a
joke by the speaker or a statement that duty was not paid on the
product.

1) is not relevant to your question. It's simply a sentence
indicating approval of something purchased.

2) does not make sense. In that case, the "back from" indicates that
something was sent somewhere and then returned or replaced. You might
buy a flawed Aran Islands sweater by mail, return it for replacement,
and get back a good one. That type of thing isn't done with booze.


Note: Either you, or Ms Cornwell, has erred. The Irish product is
"whiskey". If the product was brought back from Scotland it would be
"whisky".
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Katy Jennison
2018-10-07 14:52:26 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by tonbei
Post by tonbei
-------------------
"Can you get you anything to drink, Kay? I have some very good whisky I bootlegged back from Ireland last month. I know you like Irish whisky."
--------------------------------
So, I'd like to ask a question a little differently.
1) I got very good whisky from Ireland.
2) I got very good whisky back from Ireland.
How are 1) and 2) different in meaning?
Your new questions don't relate to your first question.
In the book quote, the person is referring to whisky [SIC] brought
back from a trip to Ireland. The "bootlegged" reference is either a
joke by the speaker or a statement that duty was not paid on the
product.
1) is not relevant to your question. It's simply a sentence
indicating approval of something purchased.
2) does not make sense. In that case, the "back from" indicates that
something was sent somewhere and then returned or replaced. You might
buy a flawed Aran Islands sweater by mail, return it for replacement,
and get back a good one. That type of thing isn't done with booze.
Surely it's simpler than that. 'Back' in this context simply means
'back to here (where I am now) from there (where I got it)'.
--
Katy Jennison
Tony Cooper
2018-10-07 15:02:11 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sun, 7 Oct 2018 15:52:26 +0100, Katy Jennison
Post by Katy Jennison
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by tonbei
Post by tonbei
-------------------
"Can you get you anything to drink, Kay? I have some very good whisky I bootlegged back from Ireland last month. I know you like Irish whisky."
--------------------------------
So, I'd like to ask a question a little differently.
1) I got very good whisky from Ireland.
2) I got very good whisky back from Ireland.
How are 1) and 2) different in meaning?
Your new questions don't relate to your first question.
In the book quote, the person is referring to whisky [SIC] brought
back from a trip to Ireland. The "bootlegged" reference is either a
joke by the speaker or a statement that duty was not paid on the
product.
1) is not relevant to your question. It's simply a sentence
indicating approval of something purchased.
2) does not make sense. In that case, the "back from" indicates that
something was sent somewhere and then returned or replaced. You might
buy a flawed Aran Islands sweater by mail, return it for replacement,
and get back a good one. That type of thing isn't done with booze.
Surely it's simpler than that. 'Back' in this context simply means
'back to here (where I am now) from there (where I got it)'.
In that case, it would be "I brought back". "Got...from" does not
suggest the person went to the place. When the "Got...back...from"
usage is employed, it suggests a replacement or return was sent.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Peter T. Daniels
2018-10-07 15:51:11 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Tony Cooper
On Sun, 7 Oct 2018 15:52:26 +0100, Katy Jennison
Post by Katy Jennison
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by tonbei
Post by tonbei
-------------------
"Can you get you anything to drink, Kay? I have some very good whisky I bootlegged back from Ireland last month. I know you like Irish whisky."
--------------------------------
So, I'd like to ask a question a little differently.
1) I got very good whisky from Ireland.
2) I got very good whisky back from Ireland.
How are 1) and 2) different in meaning?
Your new questions don't relate to your first question.
In the book quote, the person is referring to whisky [SIC] brought
back from a trip to Ireland. The "bootlegged" reference is either a
joke by the speaker or a statement that duty was not paid on the
product.
1) is not relevant to your question. It's simply a sentence
indicating approval of something purchased.
2) does not make sense. In that case, the "back from" indicates that
something was sent somewhere and then returned or replaced. You might
buy a flawed Aran Islands sweater by mail, return it for replacement,
and get back a good one. That type of thing isn't done with booze.
Surely it's simpler than that. 'Back' in this context simply means
'back to here (where I am now) from there (where I got it)'.
In that case, it would be "I brought back". "Got...from" does not
suggest the person went to the place. When the "Got...back...from"
usage is employed, it suggests a replacement or return was sent.
Oh, are you "killfiling" me now? (That would be nice.)

However, I explained perfectly the use of "back" in that sentence.
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2018-10-07 15:11:17 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Katy Jennison
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by tonbei
Post by tonbei
-------------------
"Can you get you anything to drink, Kay? I have some very good whisky I
bootlegged back from Ireland last month. I know you like Irish whisky."
--------------------------------
So, I'd like to ask a question a little differently.
1) I got very good whisky from Ireland.
2) I got very good whisky back from Ireland.
How are 1) and 2) different in meaning?
Your new questions don't relate to your first question.
In the book quote, the person is referring to whisky [SIC] brought
back from a trip to Ireland. The "bootlegged" reference is either a
joke by the speaker or a statement that duty was not paid on the
product.
1) is not relevant to your question. It's simply a sentence
indicating approval of something purchased.
2) does not make sense. In that case, the "back from" indicates that
something was sent somewhere and then returned or replaced. You might
buy a flawed Aran Islands sweater by mail, return it for replacement,
and get back a good one. That type of thing isn't done with booze.
Surely it's simpler than that. 'Back' in this context simply means
'back to here (where I am now) from there (where I got it)'.
Yes, of course. I've been surprised that a meaning that seems so
obvious to you and me has been overlooked in earlier contributions to
this thread.
--
athel
Peter T. Daniels
2018-10-07 15:52:11 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Katy Jennison
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by tonbei
Post by tonbei
-------------------
"Can you get you anything to drink, Kay? I have some very good whisky I
bootlegged back from Ireland last month. I know you like Irish whisky."
--------------------------------
So, I'd like to ask a question a little differently.
1) I got very good whisky from Ireland.
2) I got very good whisky back from Ireland.
How are 1) and 2) different in meaning?
Your new questions don't relate to your first question.
In the book quote, the person is referring to whisky [SIC] brought
back from a trip to Ireland. The "bootlegged" reference is either a
joke by the speaker or a statement that duty was not paid on the
product.
1) is not relevant to your question. It's simply a sentence
indicating approval of something purchased.
2) does not make sense. In that case, the "back from" indicates that
something was sent somewhere and then returned or replaced. You might
buy a flawed Aran Islands sweater by mail, return it for replacement,
and get back a good one. That type of thing isn't done with booze.
Surely it's simpler than that. 'Back' in this context simply means
'back to here (where I am now) from there (where I got it)'.
Yes, of course. I've been surprised that a meaning that seems so
obvious to you and me has been overlooked in earlier contributions to
this thread.
That would be "brought," not "got." Unless BrE has come up with a new
meaning for that word it hates in AmE so much?
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2018-10-07 16:04:29 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Katy Jennison
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by tonbei
Post by tonbei
-------------------
"Can you get you anything to drink, Kay? I have some very good whisky I
bootlegged back from Ireland last month. I know you like Irish whisky."
--------------------------------
So, I'd like to ask a question a little differently.
1) I got very good whisky from Ireland.
2) I got very good whisky back from Ireland.
How are 1) and 2) different in meaning?
Your new questions don't relate to your first question.
In the book quote, the person is referring to whisky [SIC] brought
back from a trip to Ireland. The "bootlegged" reference is either a
joke by the speaker or a statement that duty was not paid on the
product.
1) is not relevant to your question. It's simply a sentence
indicating approval of something purchased.
2) does not make sense. In that case, the "back from" indicates that
something was sent somewhere and then returned or replaced. You might
buy a flawed Aran Islands sweater by mail, return it for replacement,
and get back a good one. That type of thing isn't done with booze.
Surely it's simpler than that. 'Back' in this context simply means
'back to here (where I am now) from there (where I got it)'.
Yes, of course. I've been surprised that a meaning that seems so
obvious to you and me has been overlooked in earlier contributions to
this thread.
That would be "brought," not "got." Unless BrE has come up with a new
meaning for that word it hates in AmE so much?
"brought" would be better, of course, but this is Patricia Cornwell
after all (at least, I suppose it is, as I've never seen any evidence
that tonbei reads anyone else), and I don't look to her for excellence
in style. One can analyse too much: can we not say that it is poorly
written?
--
athel
Tony Cooper
2018-10-07 16:42:46 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sun, 7 Oct 2018 18:04:29 +0200, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Katy Jennison
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by tonbei
Post by tonbei
-------------------
"Can you get you anything to drink, Kay? I have some very good whisky I
bootlegged back from Ireland last month. I know you like Irish whisky."
--------------------------------
So, I'd like to ask a question a little differently.
1) I got very good whisky from Ireland.
2) I got very good whisky back from Ireland.
How are 1) and 2) different in meaning?
Your new questions don't relate to your first question.
In the book quote, the person is referring to whisky [SIC] brought
back from a trip to Ireland. The "bootlegged" reference is either a
joke by the speaker or a statement that duty was not paid on the
product.
1) is not relevant to your question. It's simply a sentence
indicating approval of something purchased.
2) does not make sense. In that case, the "back from" indicates that
something was sent somewhere and then returned or replaced. You might
buy a flawed Aran Islands sweater by mail, return it for replacement,
and get back a good one. That type of thing isn't done with booze.
Surely it's simpler than that. 'Back' in this context simply means
'back to here (where I am now) from there (where I got it)'.
Yes, of course. I've been surprised that a meaning that seems so
obvious to you and me has been overlooked in earlier contributions to
this thread.
That would be "brought," not "got." Unless BrE has come up with a new
meaning for that word it hates in AmE so much?
"brought" would be better, of course, but this is Patricia Cornwell
after all (at least, I suppose it is, as I've never seen any evidence
that tonbei reads anyone else), and I don't look to her for excellence
in style. One can analyse too much: can we not say that it is poorly
written?
Horses for courses.

Evidently tonbei enjoys reading Cornwell and her writing spurs him to
question English as she uses it. Who are we to criticize his choice
of reading material?

Cornwell is not the most elegant (<<< extreme understatement) writer,
but he may not find other choices to his liking.

Keep in mind that his comments appear in a group that is more critical
of writing style than most people would be and that his excerpts are
provided without sufficient context.

Janet's contribution of context explains the "bootlegging" and "back"
usage. The thread itself has provided fodder for the group. And,
PTD's declaration that he has provided sufficient explanation and
there's no need for anyone else to join in has provided our laugh of
the day.

What more can we ask?

I am always bothered when a single sentence or two is plucked out of
context and declared to be an affront to the discerning reader. Most
of the sentences would be taken in as part of the flow of the tale by
the average reader and neither questioned nor criticized. Isolated
here, though, they become glaring examples of being "poorly written"
dialog.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Peter T. Daniels
2018-10-07 16:53:35 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Tony Cooper
On Sun, 7 Oct 2018 18:04:29 +0200, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Katy Jennison
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by tonbei
Post by tonbei
-------------------
"Can you get you anything to drink, Kay? I have some very good whisky I
bootlegged back from Ireland last month. I know you like Irish whisky."
--------------------------------
So, I'd like to ask a question a little differently.
1) I got very good whisky from Ireland.
2) I got very good whisky back from Ireland.
How are 1) and 2) different in meaning?
Your new questions don't relate to your first question.
In the book quote, the person is referring to whisky [SIC] brought
back from a trip to Ireland. The "bootlegged" reference is either a
joke by the speaker or a statement that duty was not paid on the
product.
1) is not relevant to your question. It's simply a sentence
indicating approval of something purchased.
2) does not make sense. In that case, the "back from" indicates that
something was sent somewhere and then returned or replaced. You might
buy a flawed Aran Islands sweater by mail, return it for replacement,
and get back a good one. That type of thing isn't done with booze.
Surely it's simpler than that. 'Back' in this context simply means
'back to here (where I am now) from there (where I got it)'.
Yes, of course. I've been surprised that a meaning that seems so
obvious to you and me has been overlooked in earlier contributions to
this thread.
That would be "brought," not "got." Unless BrE has come up with a new
meaning for that word it hates in AmE so much?
"brought" would be better, of course, but this is Patricia Cornwell
after all (at least, I suppose it is, as I've never seen any evidence
that tonbei reads anyone else), and I don't look to her for excellence
in style. One can analyse too much: can we not say that it is poorly
written?
Horses for courses.
Evidently tonbei enjoys reading Cornwell and her writing spurs him to
question English as she uses it. Who are we to criticize his choice
of reading material?
Cornwell is not the most elegant (<<< extreme understatement) writer,
but he may not find other choices to his liking.
Keep in mind that his comments appear in a group that is more critical
of writing style than most people would be and that his excerpts are
provided without sufficient context.
Janet's contribution of context explains the "bootlegging" and "back"
usage. The thread itself has provided fodder for the group. And,
PTD's declaration that he has provided sufficient explanation and
there's no need for anyone else to join in has provided our laugh of
the day.
That's a perfect example of Coopering the thread. I said nothing of the
sort. I pointed out that you failed to recognize the simplest, most obvious
interpretation -- i.e., the perfect one -- but rather than going back and
seeing what that had been, you chose to imagine some imagined sin that was
never committed.
Post by Tony Cooper
What more can we ask?
I am always bothered when a single sentence or two is plucked out of
context and declared to be an affront to the discerning reader. Most
of the sentences would be taken in as part of the flow of the tale by
the average reader and neither questioned nor criticized. Isolated
here, though, they become glaring examples of being "poorly written"
dialog.
Who was it declared it "to be an affront to the discerning reader"?

Seems like you also Cooper everyone else.
Tony Cooper
2018-10-07 18:24:00 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sun, 7 Oct 2018 09:53:35 -0700 (PDT), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Tony Cooper
On Sun, 7 Oct 2018 18:04:29 +0200, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Katy Jennison
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by tonbei
Post by tonbei
-------------------
"Can you get you anything to drink, Kay? I have some very good whisky I
bootlegged back from Ireland last month. I know you like Irish whisky."
--------------------------------
So, I'd like to ask a question a little differently.
1) I got very good whisky from Ireland.
2) I got very good whisky back from Ireland.
How are 1) and 2) different in meaning?
Your new questions don't relate to your first question.
In the book quote, the person is referring to whisky [SIC] brought
back from a trip to Ireland. The "bootlegged" reference is either a
joke by the speaker or a statement that duty was not paid on the
product.
1) is not relevant to your question. It's simply a sentence
indicating approval of something purchased.
2) does not make sense. In that case, the "back from" indicates that
something was sent somewhere and then returned or replaced. You might
buy a flawed Aran Islands sweater by mail, return it for replacement,
and get back a good one. That type of thing isn't done with booze.
Surely it's simpler than that. 'Back' in this context simply means
'back to here (where I am now) from there (where I got it)'.
Yes, of course. I've been surprised that a meaning that seems so
obvious to you and me has been overlooked in earlier contributions to
this thread.
That would be "brought," not "got." Unless BrE has come up with a new
meaning for that word it hates in AmE so much?
"brought" would be better, of course, but this is Patricia Cornwell
after all (at least, I suppose it is, as I've never seen any evidence
that tonbei reads anyone else), and I don't look to her for excellence
in style. One can analyse too much: can we not say that it is poorly
written?
Horses for courses.
Evidently tonbei enjoys reading Cornwell and her writing spurs him to
question English as she uses it. Who are we to criticize his choice
of reading material?
Cornwell is not the most elegant (<<< extreme understatement) writer,
but he may not find other choices to his liking.
Keep in mind that his comments appear in a group that is more critical
of writing style than most people would be and that his excerpts are
provided without sufficient context.
Janet's contribution of context explains the "bootlegging" and "back"
usage. The thread itself has provided fodder for the group. And,
PTD's declaration that he has provided sufficient explanation and
there's no need for anyone else to join in has provided our laugh of
the day.
That's a perfect example of Coopering the thread. I said nothing of the
sort. I pointed out that you failed to recognize the simplest, most obvious
interpretation -- i.e., the perfect one -- but rather than going back and
seeing what that had been, you chose to imagine some imagined sin that was
never committed.
PTDing a thread is declaring that a perfect interpretation has been
provided by the self-appointed arbiter of what is required.

Un-PTDing a thread is adding additional information that sheds light
on the question/comment and correcting the mistakes of the
self-appointed arbiter.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Peter T. Daniels
2018-10-07 20:22:58 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Tony Cooper
On Sun, 7 Oct 2018 09:53:35 -0700 (PDT), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Tony Cooper
On Sun, 7 Oct 2018 18:04:29 +0200, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Katy Jennison
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by tonbei
Post by tonbei
-------------------
"Can you get you anything to drink, Kay? I have some very good whisky I
bootlegged back from Ireland last month. I know you like Irish whisky."
--------------------------------
So, I'd like to ask a question a little differently.
1) I got very good whisky from Ireland.
2) I got very good whisky back from Ireland.
How are 1) and 2) different in meaning?
Your new questions don't relate to your first question.
In the book quote, the person is referring to whisky [SIC] brought
back from a trip to Ireland. The "bootlegged" reference is either a
joke by the speaker or a statement that duty was not paid on the
product.
1) is not relevant to your question. It's simply a sentence
indicating approval of something purchased.
2) does not make sense. In that case, the "back from" indicates that
something was sent somewhere and then returned or replaced. You might
buy a flawed Aran Islands sweater by mail, return it for replacement,
and get back a good one. That type of thing isn't done with booze.
Surely it's simpler than that. 'Back' in this context simply means
'back to here (where I am now) from there (where I got it)'.
Yes, of course. I've been surprised that a meaning that seems so
obvious to you and me has been overlooked in earlier contributions to
this thread.
That would be "brought," not "got." Unless BrE has come up with a new
meaning for that word it hates in AmE so much?
"brought" would be better, of course, but this is Patricia Cornwell
after all (at least, I suppose it is, as I've never seen any evidence
that tonbei reads anyone else), and I don't look to her for excellence
in style. One can analyse too much: can we not say that it is poorly
written?
Horses for courses.
Evidently tonbei enjoys reading Cornwell and her writing spurs him to
question English as she uses it. Who are we to criticize his choice
of reading material?
Cornwell is not the most elegant (<<< extreme understatement) writer,
but he may not find other choices to his liking.
Keep in mind that his comments appear in a group that is more critical
of writing style than most people would be and that his excerpts are
provided without sufficient context.
Janet's contribution of context explains the "bootlegging" and "back"
usage. The thread itself has provided fodder for the group. And,
PTD's declaration that he has provided sufficient explanation and
there's no need for anyone else to join in has provided our laugh of
the day.
That's a perfect example of Coopering the thread. I said nothing of the
sort. I pointed out that you failed to recognize the simplest, most obvious
interpretation -- i.e., the perfect one -- but rather than going back and
seeing what that had been, you chose to imagine some imagined sin that was
never committed.
PTDing a thread is declaring that a perfect interpretation has been
provided by the self-appointed arbiter of what is required.
Coopering a thread is lying about what was said and then arguing against
the lie.
Post by Tony Cooper
Un-PTDing a thread is adding additional information that sheds light
on the question/comment and correcting the mistakes of the
self-appointed arbiter.
Would Cooper ever do that? On past evidence, seems unlikely.
Kerr-Mudd,John
2018-10-08 10:53:58 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sun, 07 Oct 2018 18:24:00 GMT, Tony Cooper
<***@invalid.com> wrote:

[snipped]
Post by Tony Cooper
PTDing a thread is declaring that a perfect interpretation has been
provided by the self-appointed arbiter of what is required.
Un-PTDing a thread is adding additional information that sheds light
on the question/comment and correcting the mistakes of the
self-appointed arbiter.
I disagree; PTDing a thread is where he gets to argue that white is the
new black. It's clearly troll behaviour.
--
Bah, and indeed, Humbug.
Peter T. Daniels
2018-10-08 13:36:05 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
On Sun, 07 Oct 2018 18:24:00 GMT, Tony Cooper
[snipped]
Post by Tony Cooper
PTDing a thread is declaring that a perfect interpretation has been
provided by the self-appointed arbiter of what is required.
Un-PTDing a thread is adding additional information that sheds light
on the question/comment and correcting the mistakes of the
self-appointed arbiter.
I disagree; PTDing a thread is where he gets to argue that white is the
new black. It's clearly troll behaviour.
Looks like Shithead is back. Lucky us. Since Shithead only sees scraps of
what I write that have been carefully edited to make them look ridiculous,
no wonder Shithead is so ignorant.
David Kleinecke
2018-10-08 19:18:06 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
On Sun, 07 Oct 2018 18:24:00 GMT, Tony Cooper
[snipped]
Post by Tony Cooper
PTDing a thread is declaring that a perfect interpretation has been
provided by the self-appointed arbiter of what is required.
Un-PTDing a thread is adding additional information that sheds light
on the question/comment and correcting the mistakes of the
self-appointed arbiter.
I disagree; PTDing a thread is where he gets to argue that white is the
new black. It's clearly troll behaviour.
I thought the troll goal was to get the regulars into an
argument.
Sam Plusnet
2018-10-08 22:19:23 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by David Kleinecke
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
On Sun, 07 Oct 2018 18:24:00 GMT, Tony Cooper
[snipped]
Post by Tony Cooper
PTDing a thread is declaring that a perfect interpretation has been
provided by the self-appointed arbiter of what is required.
Un-PTDing a thread is adding additional information that sheds light
on the question/comment and correcting the mistakes of the
self-appointed arbiter.
I disagree; PTDing a thread is where he gets to argue that white is the
new black. It's clearly troll behaviour.
I thought the troll goal was to get the regulars into an
argument.
No it isn't!
--
Sam Plusnet
Horace LaBadie
2018-10-08 23:57:35 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by David Kleinecke
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
On Sun, 07 Oct 2018 18:24:00 GMT, Tony Cooper
[snipped]
Post by Tony Cooper
PTDing a thread is declaring that a perfect interpretation has been
provided by the self-appointed arbiter of what is required.
Un-PTDing a thread is adding additional information that sheds light
on the question/comment and correcting the mistakes of the
self-appointed arbiter.
I disagree; PTDing a thread is where he gets to argue that white is the
new black. It's clearly troll behaviour.
I thought the troll goal was to get the regulars into an
argument.
No it isn't!
That's just contradiction !
Richard Yates
2018-10-09 00:11:23 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Mon, 08 Oct 2018 19:57:35 -0400, Horace LaBadie
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by David Kleinecke
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
On Sun, 07 Oct 2018 18:24:00 GMT, Tony Cooper
[snipped]
Post by Tony Cooper
PTDing a thread is declaring that a perfect interpretation has been
provided by the self-appointed arbiter of what is required.
Un-PTDing a thread is adding additional information that sheds light
on the question/comment and correcting the mistakes of the
self-appointed arbiter.
I disagree; PTDing a thread is where he gets to argue that white is the
new black. It's clearly troll behaviour.
I thought the troll goal was to get the regulars into an
argument.
No it isn't!
That's just contradiction !
You are both wrong and I am not posting again until you admit it.
Richard Yates
2018-10-09 00:11:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Mon, 08 Oct 2018 17:11:23 -0700, Richard Yates
Post by Richard Yates
On Mon, 08 Oct 2018 19:57:35 -0400, Horace LaBadie
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by David Kleinecke
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
On Sun, 07 Oct 2018 18:24:00 GMT, Tony Cooper
[snipped]
Post by Tony Cooper
PTDing a thread is declaring that a perfect interpretation has been
provided by the self-appointed arbiter of what is required.
Un-PTDing a thread is adding additional information that sheds light
on the question/comment and correcting the mistakes of the
self-appointed arbiter.
I disagree; PTDing a thread is where he gets to argue that white is the
new black. It's clearly troll behaviour.
I thought the troll goal was to get the regulars into an
argument.
No it isn't!
That's just contradiction !
You are both wrong and I am not posting again until you admit it.
...I'm still waiting.
Richard Yates
2018-10-09 00:12:58 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Mon, 08 Oct 2018 17:11:53 -0700, Richard Yates
Post by Richard Yates
On Mon, 08 Oct 2018 17:11:23 -0700, Richard Yates
Post by Richard Yates
On Mon, 08 Oct 2018 19:57:35 -0400, Horace LaBadie
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by David Kleinecke
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
On Sun, 07 Oct 2018 18:24:00 GMT, Tony Cooper
[snipped]
Post by Tony Cooper
PTDing a thread is declaring that a perfect interpretation has been
provided by the self-appointed arbiter of what is required.
Un-PTDing a thread is adding additional information that sheds light
on the question/comment and correcting the mistakes of the
self-appointed arbiter.
I disagree; PTDing a thread is where he gets to argue that white is the
new black. It's clearly troll behaviour.
I thought the troll goal was to get the regulars into an
argument.
No it isn't!
That's just contradiction !
You are both wrong and I am not posting again until you admit it.
...I'm still waiting.
(occam, most of this thread should not be taken at face value. HTH.)
Kerr-Mudd,John
2018-10-09 09:25:42 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Richard Yates
On Mon, 08 Oct 2018 17:11:53 -0700, Richard Yates
Post by Richard Yates
On Mon, 08 Oct 2018 17:11:23 -0700, Richard Yates
Post by Richard Yates
On Mon, 08 Oct 2018 19:57:35 -0400, Horace LaBadie
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Sam Plusnet
On Monday, October 8, 2018 at 3:54:00 AM UTC-7, Kerr-Mudd,John
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
On Sun, 07 Oct 2018 18:24:00 GMT, Tony Cooper
[snipped]
Post by Tony Cooper
PTDing a thread is declaring that a perfect interpretation has
been
Post by Richard Yates
Post by Richard Yates
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
Post by Tony Cooper
provided by the self-appointed arbiter of what is required.
Un-PTDing a thread is adding additional information that sheds
light
Post by Richard Yates
Post by Richard Yates
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
Post by Tony Cooper
on the question/comment and correcting the mistakes of the
self-appointed arbiter.
I disagree; PTDing a thread is where he gets to argue that white
is the
Post by Richard Yates
Post by Richard Yates
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
new black. It's clearly troll behaviour.
I thought the troll goal was to get the regulars into an
argument.
No it isn't!
That's just contradiction !
You are both wrong and I am not posting again until you admit it.
...I'm still waiting.
(occam, most of this thread should not be taken at face value. HTH.)
Yeah, but you smell. Ner-ner ner-ner NER!
And your (SInC) a netnazi, and I win, 'cos of Goodwin.

Oops, maybe I over(-?)did it there.
--
Bah, and indeed, Humbug.
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2018-10-09 12:05:23 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Tue, 9 Oct 2018 09:25:42 -0000 (UTC), "Kerr-Mudd,John"
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
Post by Richard Yates
On Mon, 08 Oct 2018 17:11:53 -0700, Richard Yates
Post by Richard Yates
On Mon, 08 Oct 2018 17:11:23 -0700, Richard Yates
Post by Richard Yates
On Mon, 08 Oct 2018 19:57:35 -0400, Horace LaBadie
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Sam Plusnet
On Monday, October 8, 2018 at 3:54:00 AM UTC-7, Kerr-Mudd,John
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
On Sun, 07 Oct 2018 18:24:00 GMT, Tony Cooper
[snipped]
Post by Tony Cooper
PTDing a thread is declaring that a perfect interpretation has
been
Post by Richard Yates
Post by Richard Yates
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
Post by Tony Cooper
provided by the self-appointed arbiter of what is required.
Un-PTDing a thread is adding additional information that sheds
light
Post by Richard Yates
Post by Richard Yates
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
Post by Tony Cooper
on the question/comment and correcting the mistakes of the
self-appointed arbiter.
I disagree; PTDing a thread is where he gets to argue that white
is the
Post by Richard Yates
Post by Richard Yates
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
new black. It's clearly troll behaviour.
I thought the troll goal was to get the regulars into an
argument.
No it isn't!
That's just contradiction !
You are both wrong and I am not posting again until you admit it.
...I'm still waiting.
(occam, most of this thread should not be taken at face value. HTH.)
Yeah, but you smell. Ner-ner ner-ner NER!
And your (SInC) a netnazi, and I win, 'cos of Goodwin.
Oops, maybe I over(-?)did it there.
oo! Did you overdid the o in Godwin?
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Kerr-Mudd,John
2018-10-09 12:10:46 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Tue, 09 Oct 2018 12:05:23 GMT, "Peter Duncanson [BrE]"
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Tue, 9 Oct 2018 09:25:42 -0000 (UTC), "Kerr-Mudd,John"
On Tue, 09 Oct 2018 00:12:58 GMT, Richard Yates
Post by Richard Yates
On Mon, 08 Oct 2018 17:11:53 -0700, Richard Yates
Post by Richard Yates
On Mon, 08 Oct 2018 17:11:23 -0700, Richard Yates
Post by Richard Yates
On Mon, 08 Oct 2018 19:57:35 -0400, Horace LaBadie
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Sam Plusnet
On Monday, October 8, 2018 at 3:54:00 AM UTC-7, Kerr-Mudd,John
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
On Sun, 07 Oct 2018 18:24:00 GMT, Tony Cooper
[snipped]
Post by Tony Cooper
PTDing a thread is declaring that a perfect interpretation has
been
Post by Richard Yates
Post by Richard Yates
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
Post by Tony Cooper
provided by the self-appointed arbiter of what is required.
Un-PTDing a thread is adding additional information that sheds
light
Post by Richard Yates
Post by Richard Yates
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
Post by Tony Cooper
on the question/comment and correcting the mistakes of the
self-appointed arbiter.
I disagree; PTDing a thread is where he gets to argue that
white
Post by Richard Yates
is the
Post by Richard Yates
Post by Richard Yates
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
new black. It's clearly troll behaviour.
I thought the troll goal was to get the regulars into an
argument.
No it isn't!
That's just contradiction !
You are both wrong and I am not posting again until you admit it.
...I'm still waiting.
(occam, most of this thread should not be taken at face value. HTH.)
Yeah, but you smell. Ner-ner ner-ner NER!
And your (SInC) a netnazi, and I win, 'cos of Goodwin.
Oops, maybe I over(-?)did it there.
oo! Did you overdid the o in Godwin?
Get you, Sandy.
(not visible on Google maps)
--
Bah, and indeed, Humbug.
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2018-10-09 15:16:11 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
On Tue, 09 Oct 2018 12:05:23 GMT, "Peter Duncanson [BrE]"
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Tue, 9 Oct 2018 09:25:42 -0000 (UTC), "Kerr-Mudd,John"
On Tue, 09 Oct 2018 00:12:58 GMT, Richard Yates
Post by Richard Yates
On Mon, 08 Oct 2018 17:11:53 -0700, Richard Yates
Post by Richard Yates
On Mon, 08 Oct 2018 17:11:23 -0700, Richard Yates
Post by Richard Yates
On Mon, 08 Oct 2018 19:57:35 -0400, Horace LaBadie
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Sam Plusnet
On Monday, October 8, 2018 at 3:54:00 AM UTC-7, Kerr-Mudd,John
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
On Sun, 07 Oct 2018 18:24:00 GMT, Tony Cooper
[snipped]
Post by Tony Cooper
PTDing a thread is declaring that a perfect interpretation
has
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by Richard Yates
been
Post by Richard Yates
Post by Richard Yates
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
Post by Tony Cooper
provided by the self-appointed arbiter of what is required.
Un-PTDing a thread is adding additional information that
sheds
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by Richard Yates
light
Post by Richard Yates
Post by Richard Yates
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
Post by Tony Cooper
on the question/comment and correcting the mistakes of the
self-appointed arbiter.
I disagree; PTDing a thread is where he gets to argue that
white
Post by Richard Yates
is the
Post by Richard Yates
Post by Richard Yates
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
new black. It's clearly troll behaviour.
I thought the troll goal was to get the regulars into an
argument.
No it isn't!
That's just contradiction !
You are both wrong and I am not posting again until you admit it.
...I'm still waiting.
(occam, most of this thread should not be taken at face value. HTH.)
Yeah, but you smell. Ner-ner ner-ner NER!
And your (SInC) a netnazi, and I win, 'cos of Goodwin.
Oops, maybe I over(-?)did it there.
oo! Did you overdid the o in Godwin?
Get you, Sandy.
(not visible on Google maps)
You're all talking complete nonsense. You shoud be ashamed.
--
athel
Staniel Daniel de Liver
2018-10-09 19:31:52 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On 2018-10-09 14:10:46 +0200, "Kerr-Mudd,John"
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
On Tue, 09 Oct 2018 12:05:23 GMT, "Peter Duncanson [BrE]"
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Tue, 9 Oct 2018 09:25:42 -0000 (UTC), "Kerr-Mudd,John"
On Tue, 09 Oct 2018 00:12:58 GMT, Richard Yates
Post by Richard Yates
On Mon, 08 Oct 2018 17:11:53 -0700, Richard Yates
Post by Richard Yates
On Mon, 08 Oct 2018 17:11:23 -0700, Richard Yates
Post by Richard Yates
On Mon, 08 Oct 2018 19:57:35 -0400, Horace LaBadie
Post by Janet
In article
Post by Sam Plusnet
On Monday, October 8, 2018 at 3:54:00 AM UTC-7,
Kerr-Mudd,John
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
On Sun, 07 Oct 2018 18:24:00 GMT, Tony Cooper
[snipped]
Post by Tony Cooper
PTDing a thread is declaring that a perfect
interpretation
has
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by Richard Yates
been
Post by Richard Yates
Post by Richard Yates
Post by Janet
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
Post by Tony Cooper
provided by the self-appointed arbiter of what
is required.
Un-PTDing a thread is adding additional
information that
sheds
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by Richard Yates
light
Post by Richard Yates
Post by Richard Yates
Post by Janet
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
Post by Tony Cooper
on the question/comment and correcting the
mistakes of the self-appointed arbiter.
I disagree; PTDing a thread is where he gets to
argue that
white
Post by Richard Yates
is the
Post by Richard Yates
Post by Richard Yates
Post by Janet
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
new black. It's clearly troll behaviour.
I thought the troll goal was to get the regulars
into an argument.
No it isn't!
That's just contradiction !
You are both wrong and I am not posting again until you admit it.
...I'm still waiting.
(occam, most of this thread should not be taken at face value. HTH.)
Yeah, but you smell. Ner-ner ner-ner NER!
And your (SInC) a netnazi, and I win, 'cos of Goodwin.
Oops, maybe I over(-?)did it there.
oo! Did you overdid the o in Godwin?
Get you, Sandy.
(not visible on Google maps)
You're all talking complete nonsense. You shoud be ashamed.
Spelin´ flame?

Will this get there? and if so will it have æ fine time? Don't say I
didn't warn you. © me.
Katy Jennison
2018-10-07 16:53:29 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Katy Jennison
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by tonbei
Post by tonbei
-------------------
"Can you get you anything to drink, Kay? I have some very good whisky I
bootlegged back from Ireland last month. I know you like Irish whisky."
--------------------------------
So, I'd like to ask a question a little differently.
1) I got very good whisky from Ireland.
2) I got very good whisky back from Ireland.
How are 1) and 2) different in meaning?
Your new questions don't relate to your first question.
In the book quote, the person is referring to whisky [SIC] brought
back from a trip to Ireland. The "bootlegged" reference is either a
joke by the speaker or a statement that duty was not paid on the
product.
1) is not relevant to your question. It's simply a sentence
indicating approval of something purchased.
2) does not make sense. In that case, the "back from" indicates that
something was sent somewhere and then returned or replaced. You might
buy a flawed Aran Islands sweater by mail, return it for replacement,
and get back a good one. That type of thing isn't done with booze.
Surely it's simpler than that. 'Back' in this context simply means
'back to here (where I am now) from there (where I got it)'.
Yes, of course. I've been surprised that a meaning that seems so
obvious to you and me has been overlooked in earlier contributions to
this thread.
That would be "brought," not "got." Unless BrE has come up with a new
meaning for that word it hates in AmE so much?
'Acquired'.
--
Katy Jennison
Peter T. Daniels
2018-10-07 16:55:59 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Katy Jennison
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Katy Jennison
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by tonbei
Post by tonbei
-------------------
"Can you get you anything to drink, Kay? I have some very good whisky I
bootlegged back from Ireland last month. I know you like Irish whisky."
--------------------------------
So, I'd like to ask a question a little differently.
1) I got very good whisky from Ireland.
2) I got very good whisky back from Ireland.
How are 1) and 2) different in meaning?
Your new questions don't relate to your first question.
In the book quote, the person is referring to whisky [SIC] brought
back from a trip to Ireland. The "bootlegged" reference is either a
joke by the speaker or a statement that duty was not paid on the
product.
1) is not relevant to your question. It's simply a sentence
indicating approval of something purchased.
2) does not make sense. In that case, the "back from" indicates that
something was sent somewhere and then returned or replaced. You might
buy a flawed Aran Islands sweater by mail, return it for replacement,
and get back a good one. That type of thing isn't done with booze.
Surely it's simpler than that. 'Back' in this context simply means
'back to here (where I am now) from there (where I got it)'.
Yes, of course. I've been surprised that a meaning that seems so
obvious to you and me has been overlooked in earlier contributions to
this thread.
That would be "brought," not "got." Unless BrE has come up with a new
meaning for that word it hates in AmE so much?
'Acquired'.
Whence? Not from AmE.

("I acquired very good whiskey back from Ireland." Nope.)
Peter Moylan
2018-10-08 05:48:25 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Katy Jennison
Post by Peter T. Daniels
On Sun, 7 Oct 2018 07:05:53 -0700 (PDT), tonbei
Post by tonbei
2) I got very good whisky back from Ireland.
That would be "brought," not "got." Unless BrE has come up with a
new meaning for that word it hates in AmE so much?
'Acquired'.
As a substitute for "got", OK. But as a word to use in tonbei's example,
unsuitable. You can't say "I acquired some good whiskey back from
Ireland", except in some rather improbable circumstances.

In the original example, the speaker had presumably taken a trip to
Ireland, and brought back some whiskey on her way back. The "back" in
that example clearly means "on the return trip".

Of course there are some non-travel situations where "back" would work.
Example: "I lost my wallet last week, but I finally got it back."
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Madhu
2018-10-08 06:09:28 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Katy Jennison
Post by Peter T. Daniels
On Sun, 7 Oct 2018 07:05:53 -0700 (PDT), tonbei
Post by tonbei
2) I got very good whisky back from Ireland.
That would be "brought," not "got." Unless BrE has come up with a
new meaning for that word it hates in AmE so much?
'Acquired'.
As a substitute for "got", OK. But as a word to use in tonbei's example,
unsuitable. You can't say "I acquired some good whiskey back from
Ireland", except in some rather improbable circumstances.
In the original example, the speaker had presumably taken a trip to
Ireland, and brought back some whiskey on her way back. The "back" in
that example clearly means "on the return trip".
Of course there are some non-travel situations where "back" would work.
Example: "I lost my wallet last week, but I finally got it back."
Not relevant to the above discussion but, there is also the recent sense
of "Baby has acquired a back"

From a not so recent xkcd-recent

%
Donny: My friend got back from Russia.
Me: Oh. Where is your friend normally?
Donny: Russia.
Me: So when you say he got back . . .
Donny: I mean he has a nice ass.
%
Horace LaBadie
2018-10-07 19:06:49 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by tonbei
Post by tonbei
-------------------
"Can you get you anything to drink, Kay? I have some very good whisky I
bootlegged back from Ireland last month. I know you like Irish whisky."
--------------------------------
So, I'd like to ask a question a little differently.
1) I got very good whisky from Ireland.
2) I got very good whisky back from Ireland.
How are 1) and 2) different in meaning?
Each of the usages differs from the others.

The Cornwell quotation says that the person brought the whisky home with
her from Ireland (undeclared, it seems).

Your 1) sentence simply says that the speaker obtained some good whisky
from Ireland. How or where or from whom is unknown.

Your 2) sentence is ambiguous. It seems to suggest that the whisky was
obtained in a barter exchange of some sort. (I sent a bottle of bourbon
to Ireland and got a bottle of whisky back.) It might also mean that the
whisky was confiscated and then later returned. (It was taken from me at
customs, but returned.) In a third and less likely interpretation, the
whiskey was brought back from Ireland by the speaker. (I managed to get
back with some whisky.)
b***@aol.com
2018-10-07 14:11:17 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by tonbei
re: back from
I have a question about the following sentences from a novel.
-------------------
"Can you get you anything to drink, Kay? I have some very good whisky I bootlegged back from Ireland last month. I know you like Irish whisky."
--------------------------------
context: Governor's wife jokingly asked someone who was visiting the official residence.
question: about "back from", specifically about usage of "back" here
What overtone is added with "back"?
It could be that "back" is added to mean that the speaker bootlegged
it as she came back from Ireland, as opposed to bootlegging it from
Ireland while she was there or just obtaining it through someone else
bootlegging it from Ireland.
Janet
2018-10-07 16:01:59 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by tonbei
re: back from
I have a question about the following sentences from a novel.
-------------------
"Can you get you anything to drink, Kay? I have some very good whisky I bootlegged back from Ireland last month. I know you like Irish whisky."
--------------------------------
context: Governor's wife jokingly asked someone who was visiting the official residence.
question: about "back from", specifically about usage of "back" here
What overtone is added with "back"?
The GW visited Ireland. Coming back from Ireland to USA she smuggled
some Irish whiskey, duty-free.

If you enjoy detective stories, why not pick an author whose use and
style of English is as good as the story she's telling. I recommend
Susan Hill's series about Simon Serrailer. IMHO Hill is a far better
writer than Cornwell and her books are a much more enjoyable read.

https://www.goodreads.com/series/44884-simon-serrailler

Janet.
occam
2018-10-07 16:06:05 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by tonbei
re: back from
I have a question about the following sentences from a novel.
-------------------
"Can you get you anything to drink, Kay? I have some very good whisky I bootlegged back from Ireland last month. I know you like Irish whisky."
--------------------------------
context: Governor's wife jokingly asked someone who was visiting the official residence.
question: about "back from", specifically about usage of "back" here
What overtone is added with "back"?
Whoever wrote the novel didn't know that real Irish Whiskeys are not
spelled 'Whisky'. That is the spelling of Scottish variety. 'back' is
unnecessary in that sentence.
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2018-10-07 16:35:58 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by occam
Post by tonbei
re: back from
I have a question about the following sentences from a novel.
-------------------
"Can you get you anything to drink, Kay? I have some very good whisky I
bootlegged back from Ireland last month. I know you like Irish whisky."
--------------------------------
context: Governor's wife jokingly asked someone who was visiting the official residence.
question: about "back from", specifically about usage of "back" here
What overtone is added with "back"?
Whoever wrote the novel didn't know that real Irish Whiskeys are not
spelled 'Whisky'.
Or didn't care. I know that the advertisers spell one one way and the
other the other, but I don't care which is which.
Post by occam
That is the spelling of Scottish variety. 'back' is
unnecessary in that sentence.
--
athel
Richard Yates
2018-10-07 17:52:43 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sun, 7 Oct 2018 18:35:58 +0200, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by occam
Post by tonbei
re: back from
I have a question about the following sentences from a novel.
-------------------
"Can you get you anything to drink, Kay? I have some very good whisky I
bootlegged back from Ireland last month. I know you like Irish whisky."
--------------------------------
context: Governor's wife jokingly asked someone who was visiting the
official residence.
question: about "back from", specifically about usage of "back" here
What overtone is added with "back"?
Whoever wrote the novel didn't know that real Irish Whiskeys are not
spelled 'Whisky'.
Or didn't care. I know that the advertisers spell one one way and the
other the other, but I don't care which is which.
Post by occam
That is the spelling of Scottish variety. 'back' is
unnecessary in that sentence.
And the excerpt is a quote is from a character in the novel. Maybe he
did not how to spell what he said.
occam
2018-10-07 18:29:12 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Richard Yates
On Sun, 7 Oct 2018 18:35:58 +0200, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by occam
Post by tonbei
re: back from
I have a question about the following sentences from a novel.
-------------------
"Can you get you anything to drink, Kay? I have some very good whisky I
bootlegged back from Ireland last month. I know you like Irish whisky."
--------------------------------
context: Governor's wife jokingly asked someone who was visiting the
official residence.
question: about "back from", specifically about usage of "back" here
What overtone is added with "back"?
Whoever wrote the novel didn't know that real Irish Whiskeys are not
spelled 'Whisky'.
Or didn't care. I know that the advertisers spell one one way and the
other the other, but I don't care which is which.
Post by occam
That is the spelling of Scottish variety. 'back' is
unnecessary in that sentence.
And the excerpt is a quote is from a character in the novel. Maybe he
did not how to spell what he said.
Characters in novels do not spell. They speak. Only authors spell.
Ignorant ones spell without research.
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2018-10-07 19:03:41 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by occam
Post by Richard Yates
On Sun, 7 Oct 2018 18:35:58 +0200, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by occam
Post by tonbei
re: back from
I have a question about the following sentences from a novel.
-------------------
"Can you get you anything to drink, Kay? I have some very good whisky I
bootlegged back from Ireland last month. I know you like Irish whisky."
--------------------------------
context: Governor's wife jokingly asked someone who was visiting the
official residence.
question: about "back from", specifically about usage of "back" here
What overtone is added with "back"?
Whoever wrote the novel didn't know that real Irish Whiskeys are not
spelled 'Whisky'.
Or didn't care. I know that the advertisers spell one one way and the
other the other, but I don't care which is which.
Post by occam
That is the spelling of Scottish variety. 'back' is
unnecessary in that sentence.
And the excerpt is a quote is from a character in the novel. Maybe he
did not how to spell what he said.
Characters in novels do not spell. They speak. Only authors spell.
Ignorant ones spell without research.
Indeed. But sometimes people don't research because they are unaware of
the need for it. That is not necessarily "ignorance" in a disparaging
sense.
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
occam
2018-10-07 19:14:07 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by occam
Post by Richard Yates
On Sun, 7 Oct 2018 18:35:58 +0200, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by occam
Post by tonbei
re: back from
I have a question about the following sentences from a novel.
-------------------
"Can you get you anything to drink, Kay? I have some very good whisky I
bootlegged back from Ireland last month. I know you like Irish whisky."
--------------------------------
context: Governor's wife jokingly asked someone who was visiting the
official residence.
question: about "back from", specifically about usage of "back" here
What overtone is added with "back"?
Whoever wrote the novel didn't know that real Irish Whiskeys are not
spelled 'Whisky'.
Or didn't care. I know that the advertisers spell one one way and the
other the other, but I don't care which is which.
Post by occam
That is the spelling of Scottish variety. 'back' is
unnecessary in that sentence.
And the excerpt is a quote is from a character in the novel. Maybe he
did not how to spell what he said.
Characters in novels do not spell. They speak. Only authors spell.
Ignorant ones spell without research.
Indeed. But sometimes people don't research because they are unaware of
the need for it. That is not necessarily "ignorance" in a disparaging
sense.
If the author did not know the difference between Ireland an Northern
Ireland, would that be ignorance in a disparaging sense?
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2018-10-07 20:27:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by occam
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by occam
Post by Richard Yates
On Sun, 7 Oct 2018 18:35:58 +0200, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by occam
Post by tonbei
re: back from
I have a question about the following sentences from a novel.
-------------------
"Can you get you anything to drink, Kay? I have some very good whisky I
bootlegged back from Ireland last month. I know you like Irish whisky."
--------------------------------
context: Governor's wife jokingly asked someone who was visiting the
official residence.
question: about "back from", specifically about usage of "back" here
What overtone is added with "back"?
Whoever wrote the novel didn't know that real Irish Whiskeys are not
spelled 'Whisky'.
Or didn't care. I know that the advertisers spell one one way and the
other the other, but I don't care which is which.
Post by occam
That is the spelling of Scottish variety. 'back' is
unnecessary in that sentence.
And the excerpt is a quote is from a character in the novel. Maybe he
did not how to spell what he said.
Characters in novels do not spell. They speak. Only authors spell.
Ignorant ones spell without research.
Indeed. But sometimes people don't research because they are unaware of
the need for it. That is not necessarily "ignorance" in a disparaging
sense.
If the author did not know the difference between Ireland an Northern
Ireland, would that be ignorance in a disparaging sense?
Not necessarily.
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Janet
2018-10-07 19:19:59 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by occam
Post by Richard Yates
On Sun, 7 Oct 2018 18:35:58 +0200, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by occam
Post by tonbei
re: back from
I have a question about the following sentences from a novel.
-------------------
"Can you get you anything to drink, Kay? I have some very good whisky I
bootlegged back from Ireland last month. I know you like Irish whisky."
--------------------------------
context: Governor's wife jokingly asked someone who was visiting the
official residence.
question: about "back from", specifically about usage of "back" here
What overtone is added with "back"?
Whoever wrote the novel didn't know that real Irish Whiskeys are not
spelled 'Whisky'.
Or didn't care. I know that the advertisers spell one one way and the
other the other, but I don't care which is which.
Post by occam
That is the spelling of Scottish variety. 'back' is
unnecessary in that sentence.
And the excerpt is a quote is from a character in the novel. Maybe he
did not how to spell what he said.
Characters in novels do not spell. They speak. Only authors spell.
Ignorant ones spell without research.
Plenty of novels would be more entertaining if the characters wrote
their own parts.

Pete Marino beds Kay Scarpetta at the end of every chapter.

Jack Reacher goes to buy a clean set of clothes and picks a moss-green
tweed skirt and lambswool twinset.

Janet.
Tony Cooper
2018-10-07 19:40:19 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by occam
Post by Richard Yates
On Sun, 7 Oct 2018 18:35:58 +0200, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by occam
Post by tonbei
re: back from
I have a question about the following sentences from a novel.
-------------------
"Can you get you anything to drink, Kay? I have some very good whisky I
bootlegged back from Ireland last month. I know you like Irish whisky."
--------------------------------
context: Governor's wife jokingly asked someone who was visiting the
official residence.
question: about "back from", specifically about usage of "back" here
What overtone is added with "back"?
Whoever wrote the novel didn't know that real Irish Whiskeys are not
spelled 'Whisky'.
Or didn't care. I know that the advertisers spell one one way and the
other the other, but I don't care which is which.
Post by occam
That is the spelling of Scottish variety. 'back' is
unnecessary in that sentence.
And the excerpt is a quote is from a character in the novel. Maybe he
did not how to spell what he said.
Characters in novels do not spell. They speak. Only authors spell.
Ignorant ones spell without research.
Do we know, though, which author made the mistake? Cornwell in the
novel or tonbei in his post?
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Janet
2018-10-08 12:15:29 UTC
Reply
Permalink
In article <***@4ax.com>, tonycooper214
@invalid.com says...
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by occam
Post by Richard Yates
On Sun, 7 Oct 2018 18:35:58 +0200, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by occam
Post by tonbei
re: back from
I have a question about the following sentences from a novel.
-------------------
"Can you get you anything to drink, Kay? I have some very good whisky I
bootlegged back from Ireland last month. I know you like Irish whisky."
--------------------------------
context: Governor's wife jokingly asked someone who was visiting the
official residence.
question: about "back from", specifically about usage of "back" here
What overtone is added with "back"?
Whoever wrote the novel didn't know that real Irish Whiskeys are not
spelled 'Whisky'.
Or didn't care. I know that the advertisers spell one one way and the
other the other, but I don't care which is which.
Post by occam
That is the spelling of Scottish variety. 'back' is
unnecessary in that sentence.
And the excerpt is a quote is from a character in the novel. Maybe he
did not how to spell what he said.
Characters in novels do not spell. They speak. Only authors spell.
Ignorant ones spell without research.
Do we know, though, which author made the mistake? Cornwell in the
novel or tonbei in his post?
Yes, we do know, it was Cornwell.


Janet.
Richard Yates
2018-10-07 23:59:28 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by occam
Post by Richard Yates
On Sun, 7 Oct 2018 18:35:58 +0200, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by occam
Post by tonbei
re: back from
I have a question about the following sentences from a novel.
-------------------
"Can you get you anything to drink, Kay? I have some very good whisky I
bootlegged back from Ireland last month. I know you like Irish whisky."
--------------------------------
context: Governor's wife jokingly asked someone who was visiting the
official residence.
question: about "back from", specifically about usage of "back" here
What overtone is added with "back"?
Whoever wrote the novel didn't know that real Irish Whiskeys are not
spelled 'Whisky'.
Or didn't care. I know that the advertisers spell one one way and the
other the other, but I don't care which is which.
Post by occam
That is the spelling of Scottish variety. 'back' is
unnecessary in that sentence.
And the excerpt is a quote is from a character in the novel. Maybe he
did not how to spell what he said.
Characters in novels do not spell. They speak. Only authors spell.
Ignorant ones spell without research.
occam, you really need to learn to recognize humor. This newsgroup is
full of often sly, layered jokes that seem to simply whoosh you.

It does, I realize, require the ability to conceive of a theory of
mind and then to consider the various intentions might be behind a
post.
occam
2018-10-08 07:10:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Richard Yates
Post by occam
Post by Richard Yates
On Sun, 7 Oct 2018 18:35:58 +0200, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by occam
Post by tonbei
re: back from
I have a question about the following sentences from a novel.
-------------------
"Can you get you anything to drink, Kay? I have some very good whisky I
bootlegged back from Ireland last month. I know you like Irish whisky."
--------------------------------
context: Governor's wife jokingly asked someone who was visiting the
official residence.
question: about "back from", specifically about usage of "back" here
What overtone is added with "back"?
Whoever wrote the novel didn't know that real Irish Whiskeys are not
spelled 'Whisky'.
Or didn't care. I know that the advertisers spell one one way and the
other the other, but I don't care which is which.
Post by occam
That is the spelling of Scottish variety. 'back' is
unnecessary in that sentence.
And the excerpt is a quote is from a character in the novel. Maybe he
did not how to spell what he said.
Characters in novels do not spell. They speak. Only authors spell.
Ignorant ones spell without research.
occam, you really need to learn to recognize humor. This newsgroup is
full of often sly, layered jokes that seem to simply whoosh you.
But I do. Ever day I look at the news, I recognise the buffoon you
elected as president as a joke. This particular fact seems to have
whooshed you for the last two years. People in glass houses...
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2018-10-08 07:18:54 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by occam
Post by Richard Yates
Post by occam
Post by Richard Yates
On Sun, 7 Oct 2018 18:35:58 +0200, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by occam
Post by tonbei
re: back from
I have a question about the following sentences from a novel.
-------------------
"Can you get you anything to drink, Kay? I have some very good whisky I
bootlegged back from Ireland last month. I know you like Irish whisky."
--------------------------------
context: Governor's wife jokingly asked someone who was visiting the
official residence.
question: about "back from", specifically about usage of "back" here
What overtone is added with "back"?
Whoever wrote the novel didn't know that real Irish Whiskeys are not
spelled 'Whisky'.
Or didn't care. I know that the advertisers spell one one way and the
other the other, but I don't care which is which.
Post by occam
That is the spelling of Scottish variety. 'back' is
unnecessary in that sentence.
And the excerpt is a quote is from a character in the novel. Maybe he
did not how to spell what he said.
Characters in novels do not spell. They speak. Only authors spell.
Ignorant ones spell without research.
occam, you really need to learn to recognize humor. This newsgroup is
full of often sly, layered jokes that seem to simply whoosh you.
But I do. Ever day I look at the news, I recognise the buffoon you
elected as president as a joke. This particular fact seems to have
whooshed you for the last two years. People in glass houses...
Don't laugh. You may have an orange buffoon with no respect for truth
as Prime Minister of the UK in a few months time.
--
athel
occam
2018-10-08 07:53:21 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by occam
Post by Richard Yates
Post by occam
Post by Richard Yates
On Sun, 7 Oct 2018 18:35:58 +0200, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by occam
Post by tonbei
re: back from
I have a question about the following sentences from a novel.
-------------------
"Can you get you anything to drink, Kay? I have some very good whisky I
bootlegged back from Ireland last month. I know you like Irish whisky."
--------------------------------
context: Governor's wife jokingly asked someone who was visiting the
official residence.
question: about "back from", specifically  about  usage of
"back" here
What overtone is added with "back"?
Whoever wrote the novel didn't know that real Irish Whiskeys are not
spelled 'Whisky'.
Or didn't care. I know that the advertisers spell one one way and the
other the other, but I don't care which is which.
Post by occam
That is the spelling of Scottish variety. 'back' is
unnecessary in that sentence.
And the excerpt is a quote is from a character in the novel. Maybe he
did not how to spell what he said.
Characters in novels do not spell. They speak. Only authors spell.
Ignorant ones spell without research.
occam, you really need to learn to recognize humor. This newsgroup is
full of often sly, layered jokes that seem to simply whoosh you.
But I do. Ever day I look at the news, I recognise the buffoon you
elected as president as a joke. This particular fact seems to have
whooshed you for the last two years. People in glass houses...
Don't laugh. You may have an orange buffoon with no respect for truth as
Prime Minister of the UK in a few months time.
Nil desperandum! Our buffoon will be able to make obscure references in
Latin, like no other buffoon.
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2018-10-08 08:41:47 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Richard Yates
On Sun, 7 Oct 2018 18:35:58 +0200, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by occam
Post by tonbei
re: back from
I have a question about the following sentences from a novel.
-------------------
"Can you get you anything to drink, Kay? I have some very good whisky
I>>> bootlegged back from Ireland last month. I know you like Irish
whisky."
--------------------------------
context: Governor's wife jokingly asked someone who was visiting the>>>
official residence.
question: about "back from", specifically about usage of "back" here
What overtone is added with "back"?
Whoever wrote the novel didn't know that real Irish Whiskeys are not
spelled 'Whisky'.
Or didn't care. I know that the advertisers spell one one way and
the>other the other, but I don't care which is which.
Post by occam
That is the spelling of Scottish variety. 'back' is
unnecessary in that sentence.
And the excerpt is a quote is from a character in the novel. Maybe he
did not how to spell what he said.
Checking, I find that more than 25 countries produce the stuff, of
which some spell it whisky and some spell it whiskey, and some of those
who now spell it one way spelt it the other way in the past (the USA,
for example). Why should anyone apart from advertisers care?
--
athel
J. J. Lodder
2018-10-08 09:42:32 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Richard Yates
On Sun, 7 Oct 2018 18:35:58 +0200, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by occam
Post by tonbei
re: back from
I have a question about the following sentences from a novel.
-------------------
"Can you get you anything to drink, Kay? I have some very good whisky
I>>> bootlegged back from Ireland last month. I know you like Irish
whisky."
--------------------------------
context: Governor's wife jokingly asked someone who was visiting the>>>
official residence.
question: about "back from", specifically about usage of "back" here
What overtone is added with "back"?
Whoever wrote the novel didn't know that real Irish Whiskeys are not
spelled 'Whisky'.
Or didn't care. I know that the advertisers spell one one way and
the>other the other, but I don't care which is which.
Post by occam
That is the spelling of Scottish variety. 'back' is
unnecessary in that sentence.
And the excerpt is a quote is from a character in the novel. Maybe he
did not how to spell what he said.
Checking, I find that more than 25 countries produce the stuff, of
which some spell it whisky and some spell it whiskey, and some of those
who now spell it one way spelt it the other way in the past (the USA,
for example). Why should anyone apart from advertisers care?
Yes, even in France, that is, Bretagne.
'Armorik' is one of the brands.
<https://www.masterofmalt.com/whiskies/warenghem/armorik-classic-breton-
single-malt-whisky>
The name of the distillery, 'Warenghem' makes it rather obvious
that the originators must be of Flemish origin, (modern Waregem)
so not very 'Breton'

They spell it 'whisky'.

Jan
Quinn C
2018-10-11 21:36:34 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Checking, I find that more than 25 countries produce the stuff, of
which some spell it whisky and some spell it whiskey, and some of those
who now spell it one way spelt it the other way in the past (the USA,
for example). Why should anyone apart from advertisers care?
Yes, even in France, that is, Bretagne.
'Armorik' is one of the brands.
[...]
They spell it 'whisky'.
A distillery in the German state of Hesse spells it "Whessky".
--
It gets hot in Raleigh, but Texas! I don't know why anybody
lives here, honestly.
-- Robert C. Wilson, Vortex (novel), p.220
occam
2018-10-08 12:39:18 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Richard Yates
On Sun, 7 Oct 2018 18:35:58 +0200, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by occam
Post by tonbei
re: back from
I have a question about the following sentences from a novel.
-------------------
"Can you get you anything to drink, Kay? I have some very good
whisky I>>> bootlegged back from Ireland last month. I know you
like Irish whisky."
--------------------------------
context: Governor's wife jokingly asked someone who was visiting
the>>> official residence.
question: about "back from", specifically  about  usage of "back" here
What overtone is added with "back"?
Whoever wrote the novel didn't know that real Irish Whiskeys are not
spelled 'Whisky'.
Or didn't care. I know that the advertisers spell one one way and
the>other the other, but I don't care which is which.
Post by occam
That is the spelling of Scottish variety. 'back' is
unnecessary in that sentence.
And the excerpt is a quote is from a character in the novel. Maybe he
did not how to spell what he said.
Checking, I find that more than 25 countries produce the stuff, of which
some spell it whisky and some spell it whiskey, and some of those who
now spell it one way spelt it the other way in the past (the USA, for
example). Why should anyone apart from advertisers care?
Where is this research leading to? On the other hand - how many *Irish*
whiskeys can you find which are spelled 'whisky'?

http://lmgtfy.com/?q=Irish+whisky
Peter Moylan
2018-10-08 13:32:56 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by occam
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Checking, I find that more than 25 countries produce the stuff, of
which some spell it whisky and some spell it whiskey, and some of
those who now spell it one way spelt it the other way in the past
(the USA, for example). Why should anyone apart from advertisers
care?
Where is this research leading to? On the other hand - how many
*Irish* whiskeys can you find which are spelled 'whisky'?
http://lmgtfy.com/?q=Irish+whisky
The results will, I imagine, depend on one's country. In my case the
results started with Googles "sponsored links", i.e. the people who paid
them to get better search results. The four top results included three
Irish whiskeys, and one Scotch whisky. All four being advertised by
Australian bottle shops, of course.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2018-10-08 17:08:21 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by occam
Post by Richard Yates
On Sun, 7 Oct 2018 18:35:58 +0200, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by occam
Post by tonbei
re: back from
I have a question about the following sentences from a novel.
-------------------
"Can you get you anything to drink, Kay? I have some very good
whisky I>>> bootlegged back from Ireland last month. I know you
like Irish whisky."
--------------------------------
context: Governor's wife jokingly asked someone who was visiting
the>>> official residence.
question: about "back from", specifically  about  usage of "back" here
What overtone is added with "back"?
Whoever wrote the novel didn't know that real Irish Whiskeys are not
spelled 'Whisky'.
Or didn't care. I know that the advertisers spell one one way and
the>other the other, but I don't care which is which.
Post by occam
That is the spelling of Scottish variety. 'back' is
unnecessary in that sentence.
And the excerpt is a quote is from a character in the novel. Maybe he
did not how to spell what he said.
Checking, I find that more than 25 countries produce the stuff, of which
some spell it whisky and some spell it whiskey, and some of those who
now spell it one way spelt it the other way in the past (the USA, for
example). Why should anyone apart from advertisers care?
Where is this research leading to? On the other hand - how many *Irish*
whiskeys can you find which are spelled 'whisky'?
Do you really care? I don't.
Post by occam
http://lmgtfy.com/?q=Irish+whisky
--
athel
bill van
2018-10-09 06:25:54 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Richard Yates
On Sun, 7 Oct 2018 18:35:58 +0200, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by occam
Post by tonbei
re: back from
I have a question about the following sentences from a novel.
-------------------
"Can you get you anything to drink, Kay? I have some very good whisky
I>>> bootlegged back from Ireland last month. I know you like Irish
whisky."
--------------------------------
context: Governor's wife jokingly asked someone who was visiting the>>>
official residence.
question: about "back from", specifically about usage of "back" here
What overtone is added with "back"?
Whoever wrote the novel didn't know that real Irish Whiskeys are not
spelled 'Whisky'.
Or didn't care. I know that the advertisers spell one one way and
the>other the other, but I don't care which is which.
Post by occam
That is the spelling of Scottish variety. 'back' is
unnecessary in that sentence.
And the excerpt is a quote is from a character in the novel. Maybe he
did not how to spell what he said.
Checking, I find that more than 25 countries produce the stuff, of
which some spell it whisky and some spell it whiskey, and some of those
who now spell it one way spelt it the other way in the past (the USA,
for example). Why should anyone apart from advertisers care?
I used to care when I was a whisk(e)y collector, albeit a minor one. If
you're interested in a subject,
you want to know all about it, and to get the details right should you
go on to write or talk about it.

Not so much now.

bill
occam
2018-10-09 07:35:31 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by bill van
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Richard Yates
On Sun, 7 Oct 2018 18:35:58 +0200, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by occam
Post by tonbei
re: back from
I have a question about the following sentences from a novel.
-------------------
"Can you get you anything to drink, Kay? I have some very good
whisky I>>> bootlegged back from Ireland last month. I know you
like Irish whisky."
--------------------------------
context: Governor's wife jokingly asked someone who was visiting
the>>> official residence.
question: about "back from", specifically  about  usage of "back"
here
What overtone is added with "back"?
Whoever wrote the novel didn't know that real Irish Whiskeys are not
spelled 'Whisky'.
Or didn't care. I know that the advertisers spell one one way and
the>other the other, but I don't care which is which.
Post by occam
That is the spelling of Scottish variety. 'back' is
unnecessary in that sentence.
And the excerpt is a quote is from a character in the novel. Maybe he
did not how to spell what he said.
Checking, I find that more than 25 countries produce the stuff, of
which some spell it whisky and some spell it whiskey, and some of
those who now spell it one way spelt it the other way in the past (the
USA, for example). Why should anyone apart from advertisers care?
I used to care when I was a whisk(e)y collector, albeit a minor one. If
you're interested in a subject,
you want to know all about it, and to get the details right should you
go on to write or talk about it.
Not so much now.
[Aside] You have stopped collecting, or drinking? If the latter, is your
collection open to offers? (I'm interested in most, except those
labelled Irish Whisky.)
Paul Wolff
2018-10-09 10:08:16 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by occam
Post by bill van
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Richard Yates
On Sun, 7 Oct 2018 18:35:58 +0200, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by occam
Post by tonbei
re: back from
I have a question about the following sentences from a novel.
-------------------
"Can you get you anything to drink, Kay? I have some very good
whisky I>>> bootlegged back from Ireland last month. I know you
like Irish whisky."
--------------------------------
context: Governor's wife jokingly asked someone who was visiting
the>>> official residence.
question: about "back from", specifically  about  usage of "back"
here
What overtone is added with "back"?
Whoever wrote the novel didn't know that real Irish Whiskeys are not
spelled 'Whisky'.
Or didn't care. I know that the advertisers spell one one way and
the>other the other, but I don't care which is which.
Post by occam
That is the spelling of Scottish variety. 'back' is
unnecessary in that sentence.
And the excerpt is a quote is from a character in the novel. Maybe he
did not how to spell what he said.
Checking, I find that more than 25 countries produce the stuff, of
which some spell it whisky and some spell it whiskey, and some of
those who now spell it one way spelt it the other way in the past (the
USA, for example). Why should anyone apart from advertisers care?
I used to care when I was a whisk(e)y collector, albeit a minor one. If
you're interested in a subject,
you want to know all about it, and to get the details right should you
go on to write or talk about it.
Not so much now.
[Aside] You have stopped collecting, or drinking? If the latter, is your
collection open to offers? (I'm interested in most, except those
labelled Irish Whisky.)
I can offer you a very nice Macallan Valerio Adami, bought just the
other day, and I've hardly drunk much of it. Interested?

<https://www.cbsnews.com/news/whisky-bottle-macallan-valerio-adami-edinbu
rg-scotch-bonhams/>
--
Paul
occam
2018-10-09 10:56:57 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Paul Wolff
Post by occam
Post by bill van
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Richard Yates
On Sun, 7 Oct 2018 18:35:58 +0200, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by occam
Post by tonbei
re: back from
I have a question about the following sentences from a novel.
-------------------
"Can you get you anything to drink, Kay? I have some very good
whisky I>>> bootlegged back from Ireland last month. I know you
like Irish whisky."
--------------------------------
context: Governor's wife jokingly asked someone who was visiting
the>>> official residence.
question: about "back from", specifically  about  usage of "back"
here
What overtone is added with "back"?
Whoever wrote the novel didn't know that real Irish Whiskeys are not
spelled 'Whisky'.
Or didn't care. I know that the advertisers spell one one way and
the>other the other, but I don't care which is which.
Post by occam
That is the spelling of Scottish variety. 'back' is
unnecessary in that sentence.
And the excerpt is a quote is from a character in the novel. Maybe he
did not how to spell what he said.
Checking, I find that more than 25 countries produce the stuff, of
which some spell it whisky and some spell it whiskey, and some of
those who now spell it one way spelt it the other way in the past (the
USA, for example). Why should anyone apart from advertisers care?
I used to care when I was a whisk(e)y collector, albeit a minor one. If
you're interested in a subject,
you want to know all about it, and to get the details right should you
go on to write or talk about it.
Not so much now.
[Aside] You have stopped collecting, or drinking? If the latter, is your
collection open to offers? (I'm interested in most, except those
labelled Irish Whisky.)
I can offer you a very nice Macallan Valerio Adami, bought just the
other day, and I've hardly drunk much of it. Interested?
<https://www.cbsnews.com/news/whisky-bottle-macallan-valerio-adami-edinbu
rg-scotch-bonhams/>
If the price appreciates between the time I buy it and drink it, do I
have to pay Capital Gains Tax to HMRC? (That price, for a bottle, is
obscene.)
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2018-10-09 15:27:15 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by occam
Post by Paul Wolff
Post by occam
Post by bill van
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Richard Yates
On Sun, 7 Oct 2018 18:35:58 +0200, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by occam
Post by tonbei
re: back from
I have a question about the following sentences from a novel.
-------------------
"Can you get you anything to drink, Kay? I have some very good
whisky I>>> bootlegged back from Ireland last month. I know you
like Irish whisky."
--------------------------------
context: Governor's wife jokingly asked someone who was visiting
the>>> official residence.
question: about "back from", specifically  about  usage of "back"
here
What overtone is added with "back"?
Whoever wrote the novel didn't know that real Irish Whiskeys are not
spelled 'Whisky'.
Or didn't care. I know that the advertisers spell one one way and
the>other the other, but I don't care which is which.
Post by occam
That is the spelling of Scottish variety. 'back' is
unnecessary in that sentence.
And the excerpt is a quote is from a character in the novel. Maybe he
did not how to spell what he said.
Checking, I find that more than 25 countries produce the stuff, of
which some spell it whisky and some spell it whiskey, and some of
those who now spell it one way spelt it the other way in the past (the
USA, for example). Why should anyone apart from advertisers care?
I used to care when I was a whisk(e)y collector, albeit a minor one. If
you're interested in a subject,
you want to know all about it, and to get the details right should you
go on to write or talk about it.
Not so much now.
[Aside] You have stopped collecting, or drinking? If the latter, is your
collection open to offers? (I'm interested in most, except those
labelled Irish Whisky.)
I can offer you a very nice Macallan Valerio Adami, bought just the
other day, and I've hardly drunk much of it. Interested?
<https://www.cbsnews.com/news/whisky-bottle-macallan-valerio-adami-edinbu
rg-scotch-bonhams/>
If the price appreciates between the time I buy it and drink it, do I
have to pay Capital Gains Tax to HMRC? (That price, for a bottle, is
obscene.)
It does seem a bit pricy. When I visited Glengoyne Distillery a couple
of year ago I saw that they offered one at only about £1000 a bottle --
virtually given away. I didn't buy any of that, but I bought a bottle
at around £50 for my wife (she likes whisky a lot more than I do). It
was an embarrassing time though, as I couldn't get the PIN code on my
credit card right, so I tried a different card and I couldn't get that
right either. However, the woman at the check-out said no matter, you
can just sign the slip, so I did.
--
athel
bill van
2018-10-09 20:51:45 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by occam
Post by Paul Wolff
I can offer you a very nice Macallan Valerio Adami, bought just the
other day, and I've hardly drunk much of it. Interested?
<https://www.cbsnews.com/news/whisky-bottle-macallan-valerio-adami-edinbu
rg-scotch-bonhams/>
If the price appreciates between the time I buy it and drink it, do I
have to pay Capital Gains Tax to HMRC? (That price, for a bottle, is
obscene.)
It does seem a bit pricy. When I visited Glengoyne Distillery a couple
of year ago I saw that they offered one at only about £1000 a bottle --
virtually given away. I didn't buy any of that, but I bought a bottle
at around £50 for my wife (she likes whisky a lot more than I do). It
was an embarrassing time though, as I couldn't get the PIN code on my
credit card right, so I tried a different card and I couldn't get that
right either. However, the woman at the check-out said no matter, you
can just sign the slip, so I did.
Every now and then, the news media carry stories about a collector's
bottle priced in the tens of thousands
of dollars, and occasionally hundreds of thousands. They are usually
not for drinking but for investing; they
tend to keep on appreciating.

bill
Peter T. Daniels
2018-10-09 21:31:30 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by bill van
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by occam
Post by Paul Wolff
I can offer you a very nice Macallan Valerio Adami, bought just the
other day, and I've hardly drunk much of it. Interested?
<https://www.cbsnews.com/news/whisky-bottle-macallan-valerio-adami-edinbu
rg-scotch-bonhams/>
If the price appreciates between the time I buy it and drink it, do I
have to pay Capital Gains Tax to HMRC? (That price, for a bottle, is
obscene.)
It does seem a bit pricy. When I visited Glengoyne Distillery a couple
of year ago I saw that they offered one at only about £1000 a bottle --
virtually given away. I didn't buy any of that, but I bought a bottle
at around £50 for my wife (she likes whisky a lot more than I do). It
was an embarrassing time though, as I couldn't get the PIN code on my
credit card right, so I tried a different card and I couldn't get that
right either. However, the woman at the check-out said no matter, you
can just sign the slip, so I did.
Every now and then, the news media carry stories about a collector's
bottle priced in the tens of thousands
of dollars, and occasionally hundreds of thousands. They are usually
not for drinking but for investing; they
tend to keep on appreciating.
A cellar in Paris was found that was thought to be Thomas Jefferson's.
The bottles were auctioned for astronomical amounts. Eventually one of
them was sacrificed. The wine had not survived.
occam
2018-10-10 14:31:29 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by bill van
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by occam
Post by Paul Wolff
I can offer you a very nice Macallan Valerio Adami, bought just the
other day, and I've hardly drunk much of it. Interested?
<https://www.cbsnews.com/news/whisky-bottle-macallan-valerio-adami-edinbu
rg-scotch-bonhams/>
If the price appreciates between the time I buy it and drink it, do I
have to pay Capital Gains Tax to HMRC? (That price, for a bottle, is
obscene.)
It does seem a bit pricy. When I visited Glengoyne Distillery a couple
of year ago I saw that they offered one at only about £1000 a bottle
-- virtually given away. I didn't buy any of that, but I bought a
bottle at around £50 for my wife (she likes whisky a lot more than I
do). It was an embarrassing time though, as I couldn't get the PIN
code on my credit card right, so I tried a different card and I
couldn't get that right either. However, the woman at the check-out
said no matter, you can just sign the slip, so I did.
Every now and then, the news media carry stories about a collector's
bottle priced in the tens of thousands
of dollars, and occasionally hundreds of thousands. They are usually not
for drinking but for investing; they
tend to keep on appreciating.
I find the word 'appreciating' ironic here, given that the contents of
the bottles cannot be appreciated by their owners. Can you imagine two
friends sitting and enjoying a shot (or two) of the stuff, with a cigar?
bill van
2018-10-11 06:16:22 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by occam
Post by bill van
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by occam
Post by Paul Wolff
I can offer you a very nice Macallan Valerio Adami, bought just the
other day, and I've hardly drunk much of it. Interested?
<https://www.cbsnews.com/news/whisky-bottle-macallan-valerio-adami-edinbu
rg-scotch-bonhams/>
If the price appreciates between the time I buy it and drink it, do I
have to pay Capital Gains Tax to HMRC? (That price, for a bottle, is
obscene.)
It does seem a bit pricy. When I visited Glengoyne Distillery a couple
of year ago I saw that they offered one at only about £1000 a bottle
-- virtually given away. I didn't buy any of that, but I bought a
bottle at around £50 for my wife (she likes whisky a lot more than I
do). It was an embarrassing time though, as I couldn't get the PIN
code on my credit card right, so I tried a different card and I
couldn't get that right either. However, the woman at the check-out
said no matter, you can just sign the slip, so I did.
Every now and then, the news media carry stories about a collector's
bottle priced in the tens of thousands
of dollars, and occasionally hundreds of thousands. They are usually not
for drinking but for investing; they
tend to keep on appreciating.
I find the word 'appreciating' ironic here, given that the contents of
the bottles cannot be appreciated by their owners. Can you imagine two
friends sitting and enjoying a shot (or two) of the stuff, with a cigar?
I was obviously referring to the sense of appreciating that means
rising in value.
I don't believe I could appreciate -- in the sense of enjoy -- a dram that cost
hundreds or thousands of dollars. I think I'd rather sell it to someone crazy
enough to pay that kind of money for a drink, and then I'd use the money
to buy a case or two of very good single malt.

bill
Snidely
2018-10-11 09:17:12 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by occam
Post by bill van
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by occam
Post by Paul Wolff
I can offer you a very nice Macallan Valerio Adami, bought just the
other day, and I've hardly drunk much of it. Interested?
<https://www.cbsnews.com/news/whisky-bottle-macallan-valerio-adami-edinbu
rg-scotch-bonhams/>
If the price appreciates between the time I buy it and drink it, do I
have to pay Capital Gains Tax to HMRC? (That price, for a bottle, is
obscene.)
It does seem a bit pricy. When I visited Glengoyne Distillery a couple
of year ago I saw that they offered one at only about £1000 a bottle
-- virtually given away. I didn't buy any of that, but I bought a
bottle at around £50 for my wife (she likes whisky a lot more than I
do). It was an embarrassing time though, as I couldn't get the PIN
code on my credit card right, so I tried a different card and I
couldn't get that right either. However, the woman at the check-out
said no matter, you can just sign the slip, so I did.
Every now and then, the news media carry stories about a collector's
bottle priced in the tens of thousands
of dollars, and occasionally hundreds of thousands. They are usually not
for drinking but for investing; they
tend to keep on appreciating.
I find the word 'appreciating' ironic here, given that the contents of
the bottles cannot be appreciated by their owners. Can you imagine two
friends sitting and enjoying a shot (or two) of the stuff, with a cigar?
I was obviously referring to the sense of appreciating that means rising in
value.
I don't believe I could appreciate -- in the sense of enjoy -- a dram that cost
hundreds or thousands of dollars. I think I'd rather sell it to someone crazy
enough to pay that kind of money for a drink, and then I'd use the money
to buy a case or two of very good single malt.
In a less still sense, aren't there some very expensive bottles of
vinegar making the auction rounds these days?

/dps
--
Rule #0: Don't be on fire.
In case of fire, exit the building before tweeting about it.
(Sighting reported by Adam F)
occam
2018-10-11 10:23:19 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Snidely
Post by occam
Post by bill van
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by occam
Post by Paul Wolff
I can offer you a very nice Macallan Valerio Adami, bought just the
other day, and I've hardly drunk much of it. Interested?
<https://www.cbsnews.com/news/whisky-bottle-macallan-valerio-adami-edinbu
rg-scotch-bonhams/>
If the price appreciates between the time I buy it and drink it, do I
have to pay Capital Gains Tax to HMRC? (That price, for a bottle, is
obscene.)
It does seem a bit pricy. When I visited Glengoyne Distillery a couple
of year ago I saw that they offered one at only about £1000 a bottle
-- virtually given away. I didn't buy any of that, but I bought a
bottle at around £50 for my wife (she likes whisky a lot more than I
do). It was an embarrassing time though, as I couldn't get the PIN
code on my credit card right, so I tried a different card and I
couldn't get that right either. However, the woman at the check-out
said no matter, you can just sign the slip, so I did.
Every now and then, the news media carry stories about a collector's
bottle priced in the tens of thousands
of dollars, and occasionally hundreds of thousands. They are usually not
for drinking but for investing; they
tend to keep on appreciating.
I find the word 'appreciating' ironic here, given that the contents of
the bottles cannot be appreciated by their owners. Can you imagine two
friends sitting and enjoying a shot (or two) of the stuff, with a cigar?
 I was obviously referring to the sense of appreciating that means
rising in value.
I don't believe I could appreciate -- in the sense of enjoy -- a dram that cost
hundreds or thousands of dollars. I think I'd rather sell it to someone crazy
enough to pay that kind of money for a drink, and then I'd use the money
to buy a case or two of very good single malt.
In a less still sense, aren't there some very expensive bottles of
vinegar making the auction rounds these days?
Perhaps they started out as very expensive bottles of wine, until their
last owner was tempted to open them...
Sam Plusnet
2018-10-11 20:17:57 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by occam
Post by Snidely
Post by occam
Post by bill van
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by occam
Post by Paul Wolff
I can offer you a very nice Macallan Valerio Adami, bought just the
other day, and I've hardly drunk much of it. Interested?
<https://www.cbsnews.com/news/whisky-bottle-macallan-valerio-adami-edinbu
rg-scotch-bonhams/>
If the price appreciates between the time I buy it and drink it, do I
have to pay Capital Gains Tax to HMRC? (That price, for a bottle, is
obscene.)
It does seem a bit pricy. When I visited Glengoyne Distillery a couple
of year ago I saw that they offered one at only about £1000 a bottle
-- virtually given away. I didn't buy any of that, but I bought a
bottle at around £50 for my wife (she likes whisky a lot more than I
do). It was an embarrassing time though, as I couldn't get the PIN
code on my credit card right, so I tried a different card and I
couldn't get that right either. However, the woman at the check-out
said no matter, you can just sign the slip, so I did.
Every now and then, the news media carry stories about a collector's
bottle priced in the tens of thousands
of dollars, and occasionally hundreds of thousands. They are usually not
for drinking but for investing; they
tend to keep on appreciating.
I find the word 'appreciating' ironic here, given that the contents of
the bottles cannot be appreciated by their owners. Can you imagine two
friends sitting and enjoying a shot (or two) of the stuff, with a cigar?
 I was obviously referring to the sense of appreciating that means
rising in value.
I don't believe I could appreciate -- in the sense of enjoy -- a dram that cost
hundreds or thousands of dollars. I think I'd rather sell it to someone crazy
enough to pay that kind of money for a drink, and then I'd use the money
to buy a case or two of very good single malt.
In a less still sense, aren't there some very expensive bottles of
vinegar making the auction rounds these days?
Perhaps they started out as very expensive bottles of wine, until their
last owner was tempted to open them...
You don't know until you pull the cork.

Schrödinger's claret?
--
Sam Plusnet
charles
2018-10-11 20:50:54 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by occam
Post by Snidely
Post by bill van
Post by occam
Post by bill van
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by occam
Post by Paul Wolff
I can offer you a very nice Macallan Valerio Adami, bought just
the other day, and I've hardly drunk much of it. Interested?
<https://www.cbsnews.com/news/whisky-bottle-macallan-valerio-adami-edinbu
rg-scotch-bonhams/>
If the price appreciates between the time I buy it and drink it,
do I have to pay Capital Gains Tax to HMRC? (That price, for a
bottle, is obscene.)
It does seem a bit pricy. When I visited Glengoyne Distillery a
couple of year ago I saw that they offered one at only about £1000
a bottle -- virtually given away. I didn't buy any of that, but I
bought a bottle at around £50 for my wife (she likes whisky a lot
more than I do). It was an embarrassing time though, as I couldn't
get the PIN code on my credit card right, so I tried a different
card and I couldn't get that right either. However, the woman at
the check-out said no matter, you can just sign the slip, so I did.
Every now and then, the news media carry stories about a
collector's bottle priced in the tens of thousands of dollars, and
occasionally hundreds of thousands. They are usually not for
drinking but for investing; they tend to keep on appreciating.
I find the word 'appreciating' ironic here, given that the contents
of the bottles cannot be appreciated by their owners. Can you
imagine two friends sitting and enjoying a shot (or two) of the
stuff, with a cigar?
I was obviously referring to the sense of appreciating that means
rising in value. I don't believe I could appreciate -- in the sense
of enjoy -- a dram that cost hundreds or thousands of dollars. I
think I'd rather sell it to someone crazy enough to pay that kind of
money for a drink, and then I'd use the money to buy a case or two of
very good single malt.
In a less still sense, aren't there some very expensive bottles of
vinegar making the auction rounds these days?
Perhaps they started out as very expensive bottles of wine, until their
last owner was tempted to open them...
You don't know until you pull the cork.
Schrödinger's claret?
Some years ago, there was a UK tv antiques programme, where the show had
bought a bottle of old & expensive wine. It was opened and glasses poured
for the panel. The camera zoomed in on one who was making a face. "You
thoughts?" asked the show host. "I don't like drinking mushroom ketchup!"
--
from KT24 in Surrey, England
"I'd rather die of exhaustion than die of boredom" Thomas Carlyle
Quinn C
2018-10-11 21:36:32 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Snidely
Post by bill van
I don't believe I could appreciate -- in the sense of enjoy -- a dram that cost
hundreds or thousands of dollars. I think I'd rather sell it to someone crazy
enough to pay that kind of money for a drink, and then I'd use the money
to buy a case or two of very good single malt.
In a less still sense, aren't there some very expensive bottles of
vinegar making the auction rounds these days?
I was amazed to see a bottle priced at over $400 in a supermarket(!)
here. Behind locked glass, though. It claimed to be aged 100 years.

I'm sure that's nothing compared to stuff that's being auctioned.
--
In the old days, the complaints about the passing of the
golden age were much more sophisticated.
-- James Hogg in alt.usage.english
bill van
2018-10-09 20:47:44 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by occam
Post by bill van
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Checking, I find that more than 25 countries produce the stuff, of
which some spell it whisky and some spell it whiskey, and some of
those who now spell it one way spelt it the other way in the past (the
USA, for example). Why should anyone apart from advertisers care?
I used to care when I was a whisk(e)y collector, albeit a minor one. If
you're interested in a subject,
you want to know all about it, and to get the details right should you
go on to write or talk about it.
Not so much now.
[Aside] You have stopped collecting, or drinking? If the latter, is your
collection open to offers? (I'm interested in most, except those
labelled Irish Whisky.)
Stopped collecting. My pension is somewhat less than my salary was
when I was working, and now I buy just a couple or three bottles of single malt
a year.

Before I retired, I'd have maybe 12 to 15 malts on hand at a given time,
at least half of them from south Islay, plus a few Canadian, Irish and
American whisk(e)ys.
I've been retired for something nearly eight years, and the collection has gone
the way of all single malts. Sláinte.

bill
Tony Cooper
2018-10-09 23:41:52 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by bill van
Post by occam
Post by bill van
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Checking, I find that more than 25 countries produce the stuff, of
which some spell it whisky and some spell it whiskey, and some of
those who now spell it one way spelt it the other way in the past (the
USA, for example). Why should anyone apart from advertisers care?
I used to care when I was a whisk(e)y collector, albeit a minor one. If
you're interested in a subject,
you want to know all about it, and to get the details right should you
go on to write or talk about it.
Not so much now.
[Aside] You have stopped collecting, or drinking? If the latter, is your
collection open to offers? (I'm interested in most, except those
labelled Irish Whisky.)
Stopped collecting. My pension is somewhat less than my salary was
when I was working, and now I buy just a couple or three bottles of single malt
a year.
Before I retired, I'd have maybe 12 to 15 malts on hand at a given time,
at least half of them from south Islay, plus a few Canadian, Irish and
American whisk(e)ys.
I've been retired for something nearly eight years, and the collection has gone
the way of all single malts. Sláinte.
I am not a drinker. I imbibe occasionally, but often go weeks without
a drink. When I do drink, I'll have one beer, two glasses of wine, or
one Southern Comfort on the rocks.

Having established that, I have to admit that I do not understand
buying a bottle of hooch that is not to be consumed before buying
another bottle of the same type.

We have a wet bar, and a some cabinets that contain various bottles of
different types of alcoholic beverages. A bottle of gin, a bottle of
vodka, and so forth. The standards like this are kept for
entertaining.

Some of the bottles up there were brought to this house from our last
house, and we've been in this house for over 30 years. Some were
gifts or odd purchases. There's an unopened, still-sealed, bottle of
Curacao that may have come down here with us from Chicago. I don't
know how it's served. There's a bottle of something called Frungelico
that's in an interesting bottle, but almost full.

The only repeat item is several bottles of akvavit. Every time my
brother visits, he brings a bottle. We make a show of serving it
once, and then it goes back to the cabinet. He's coming again next
week, so I guess we'll have another bottle.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Jerry Friedman
2018-10-10 01:42:15 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by bill van
Post by occam
Post by bill van
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Checking, I find that more than 25 countries produce the stuff, of
which some spell it whisky and some spell it whiskey, and some of
those who now spell it one way spelt it the other way in the past (the
USA, for example). Why should anyone apart from advertisers care?
I used to care when I was a whisk(e)y collector, albeit a minor one. If
you're interested in a subject,
you want to know all about it, and to get the details right should you
go on to write or talk about it.
Not so much now.
[Aside] You have stopped collecting, or drinking? If the latter, is your
collection open to offers? (I'm interested in most, except those
labelled Irish Whisky.)
Stopped collecting. My pension is somewhat less than my salary was
when I was working, and now I buy just a couple or three bottles of single malt
a year.
Before I retired, I'd have maybe 12 to 15 malts on hand at a given time,
at least half of them from south Islay, plus a few Canadian, Irish and
American whisk(e)ys.
I've been retired for something nearly eight years, and the collection has gone
the way of all single malts. Sláinte.
I am not a drinker. I imbibe occasionally, but often go weeks without
a drink. When I do drink, I'll have one beer, two glasses of wine, or
one Southern Comfort on the rocks.
Having established that, I have to admit that I do not understand
buying a bottle of hooch that is not to be consumed before buying
another bottle of the same type.
We have a wet bar, and a some cabinets that contain various bottles of
different types of alcoholic beverages. A bottle of gin, a bottle of
vodka, and so forth. The standards like this are kept for
entertaining.
Some of the bottles up there were brought to this house from our last
house, and we've been in this house for over 30 years. Some were
gifts or odd purchases. There's an unopened, still-sealed, bottle of
Curacao that may have come down here with us from Chicago. I don't
know how it's served. There's a bottle of something called Frungelico
that's in an interesting bottle, but almost full.
The only repeat item is several bottles of akvavit. Every time my
brother visits, he brings a bottle. We make a show of serving it
once, and then it goes back to the cabinet. He's coming again next
week, so I guess we'll have another bottle.
Tell him that if he wants any akvavit, he's going to have
to drink some Frangelico. (It's from "Fra Angelico",
where "Fra" means "Friar".)
--
Jerry Friedman
Lewis
2018-10-10 09:32:33 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by bill van
Post by occam
Post by bill van
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Checking, I find that more than 25 countries produce the stuff, of
which some spell it whisky and some spell it whiskey, and some of
those who now spell it one way spelt it the other way in the past (the
USA, for example). Why should anyone apart from advertisers care?
I used to care when I was a whisk(e)y collector, albeit a minor one. If
you're interested in a subject,
you want to know all about it, and to get the details right should you
go on to write or talk about it.
Not so much now.
[Aside] You have stopped collecting, or drinking? If the latter, is your
collection open to offers? (I'm interested in most, except those
labelled Irish Whisky.)
Stopped collecting. My pension is somewhat less than my salary was
when I was working, and now I buy just a couple or three bottles of single malt
a year.
Before I retired, I'd have maybe 12 to 15 malts on hand at a given time,
at least half of them from south Islay, plus a few Canadian, Irish and
American whisk(e)ys.
I've been retired for something nearly eight years, and the collection has gone
the way of all single malts. Sláinte.
I am not a drinker. I imbibe occasionally, but often go weeks without
a drink. When I do drink, I'll have one beer, two glasses of wine, or
one Southern Comfort on the rocks.
Having established that, I have to admit that I do not understand
buying a bottle of hooch that is not to be consumed before buying
another bottle of the same type.
Identical bottles? Or just "all gin is the same" bottles?
Post by Tony Cooper
We have a wet bar, and a some cabinets that contain various bottles of
different types of alcoholic beverages. A bottle of gin, a bottle of
vodka, and so forth. The standards like this are kept for
entertaining.
That's fine, but anyone who drinks whiskey or gin or rum probably has
several varieties, simetimes just for the different flavors, and
sometimes for the quality.

For example, I often have a bottle of 15-20 year old port, which is
decent and not terrible expensive (around $20 or so), but I also will
have a bottle of 30yo port, which is generally much more expensive
($80-100). I ration that stuff carefully and keep it in the back.

It's not uncommon for me to have a cheap whiskey for cocktails and a good
whiskey for drinking straight. Southern Comfort is a cheap whiskey on
this scale, though it has some added flavors that make it a smoother and
sweeter drink than straight whiskey. I am not a fan, but then I tend to
not like sweet liquors.

So, I might have a bottle of whiskey that is under $20 for 1.75l, and
another bottle that is $60-70 for 750ml.

I'm the same with gin, where I buy whatever is on sale of the "usual"
stuff, and then get 375ml bottles of a really good craft gin from my
friend's distillery.
Post by Tony Cooper
Some of the bottles up there were brought to this house from our last
house, and we've been in this house for over 30 years. Some were
gifts or odd purchases. There's an unopened, still-sealed, bottle of
Curacao that may have come down here with us from Chicago. I don't
know how it's served. There's a bottle of something called Frungelico
that's in an interesting bottle, but almost full.
I had a similar story until we moved the last time, about 6 ½ years
ago. We moved several bottle from our house which were years old, and
many more from my in-law's house that were many more years old (One
bottle of Johnny Walker might have been bought in the 70s). Since moving
into this house, however, I've taken up the habit of drinking.

Where before a bottle of tequila would last me a few years, now it lasts
a few months.

For your bottles, I'd have to look them up. Curaçao is an orange liqueur
which I've only ever used in baking. I assume you would mix it with rum
in some tropical drink with a wedge o pineapple? Never heard of
Frungelico, but it sounds Italian? Frangelico? Google says it's a
hazelnut liqueur. ?shrug?

Rums are very different, and come in at least three main varieties,
silver, dark, and spiced. Some of the spiced rums are "black" and I
would put these in their own category from the usual Cpt Morgan spiced
rum (which I find too sweet, see above).
Post by Tony Cooper
The only repeat item is several bottles of akvavit. Every time my
brother visits, he brings a bottle. We make a show of serving it
once, and then it goes back to the cabinet. He's coming again next
week, so I guess we'll have another bottle.
Never heard of that. The definition makes it sound like vodka.

But, like anything, if you have no interest in it, then variety isn't
important to you. If you only have chocolate around for your grandkids,
you're not going to go to Godiva and you might wonder why there's milk
chocolate and dark chocolate and different levels of cocoa. And what is
semi-sweet anyway?

Or me with cars. Does it have 4 wheels and seatbelts and does it go?
That's about all I care about. I can't imagine why anyone would spend
$50,000 on a car, much less $250,000.
--
'Can't argue with the truth, sir.' 'In my experience, Vimes, you can
argue with anything.'
Tony Cooper
2018-10-10 12:25:25 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Wed, 10 Oct 2018 09:32:33 -0000 (UTC), Lewis
Post by Lewis
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by bill van
Post by occam
Post by bill van
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Checking, I find that more than 25 countries produce the stuff, of
which some spell it whisky and some spell it whiskey, and some of
those who now spell it one way spelt it the other way in the past (the
USA, for example). Why should anyone apart from advertisers care?
I used to care when I was a whisk(e)y collector, albeit a minor one. If
you're interested in a subject,
you want to know all about it, and to get the details right should you
go on to write or talk about it.
Not so much now.
[Aside] You have stopped collecting, or drinking? If the latter, is your
collection open to offers? (I'm interested in most, except those
labelled Irish Whisky.)
Stopped collecting. My pension is somewhat less than my salary was
when I was working, and now I buy just a couple or three bottles of single malt
a year.
Before I retired, I'd have maybe 12 to 15 malts on hand at a given time,
at least half of them from south Islay, plus a few Canadian, Irish and
American whisk(e)ys.
I've been retired for something nearly eight years, and the collection has gone
the way of all single malts. Sláinte.
I am not a drinker. I imbibe occasionally, but often go weeks without
a drink. When I do drink, I'll have one beer, two glasses of wine, or
one Southern Comfort on the rocks.
Having established that, I have to admit that I do not understand
buying a bottle of hooch that is not to be consumed before buying
another bottle of the same type.
Identical bottles? Or just "all gin is the same" bottles?
What I meant was that when a bottle of gin is near empty, I buy
another bottle of gin. All gin is pretty much the same to me, so I
buy some brand I've heard of. So far, no guest has complained.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Lewis
2018-10-11 05:33:37 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Wed, 10 Oct 2018 08:25:25 -0400, Tony Cooper
Post by Tony Cooper
What I meant was that when a bottle of gin is near empty, I buy
another bottle of gin. All gin is pretty much the same to me, so I
buy some brand I've heard of. So far, no guest has complained.
To me, different brands of gin can be very different. I like some much
more than others. Two of my favorites are Tanqueray 10 and Hendricks,
and two of my least favorite are the regular Tanqueray and Beefeaters.
Regular Tanq is ... um.... not good. Yeah. Beefeaters is fine if you're
just making gin and tonics, and it is a proper strength unlike most gins
that are watered down to 80 proof.

For martinis, a better gin is definitely worth it.

In fact, a martini sounds pretty excellent right about now.
But if I were a guest in someone's house and he served me a gin I
didn't like, I wouldn't complain.
--
So here's us, on the raggedy edge. Don't push me. And I won't push you.
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2018-10-11 08:17:17 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Lewis
[ … ]
Post by Tony Cooper
Having established that, I have to admit that I do not understand
buying a bottle of hooch that is not to be consumed before buying
another bottle of the same type.
Identical bottles? Or just "all gin is the same" bottles?
In 1976 I visited my aunt in Toronto. I brought some duty-free
Glenfiddich with me. The first evening she gave a party to me some of
her friends (mostly academics from the U of T). To those who asked for
Scotch I gave Glenfiddich, but they didn't see the bottle, which was in
the kitchen. When it came time for refills my aunt told them to help
themselves. The first one came back with the bottle of Glenfiddich and
asked if that was what they had been drinking, and I said yes. Then
with one voice all the whisky drinkers started saying how wonderful it
was, a thought that hadn't occurred to them when they thought they were
drinking Vat 59.

The only valid taste test is a blind test.
--
athel
occam
2018-10-11 10:26:10 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Lewis
[ … ]
Post by Tony Cooper
Having established that, I have to admit that I do not understand
buying a bottle of hooch that is not to be consumed before buying
another bottle of the same type.
Identical bottles? Or just "all gin is the same" bottles?
In 1976 I visited my aunt in Toronto. I brought some duty-free
Glenfiddich with me. The first evening she gave a party to me some of
her friends (mostly academics from the U of T). To those who asked for
Scotch I gave Glenfiddich, but they didn't see the bottle, which was in
the kitchen. When it came time for refills my aunt told them to help
themselves. The first one came back with the bottle of Glenfiddich and
asked if that was what they had been drinking, and I said yes. Then with
one voice all the whisky drinkers started saying how wonderful it was, a
thought that hadn't occurred to them when they thought they were
drinking Vat 59.
The only valid taste test is a blind test.
Queue Lodder. "Not just blind, but double-blind test"
occam
2018-10-11 10:27:09 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by occam
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Lewis
[ … ]
Post by Tony Cooper
Having established that, I have to admit that I do not understand
buying a bottle of hooch that is not to be consumed before buying
another bottle of the same type.
Identical bottles? Or just "all gin is the same" bottles?
In 1976 I visited my aunt in Toronto. I brought some duty-free
Glenfiddich with me. The first evening she gave a party to me some of
her friends (mostly academics from the U of T). To those who asked for
Scotch I gave Glenfiddich, but they didn't see the bottle, which was in
the kitchen. When it came time for refills my aunt told them to help
themselves. The first one came back with the bottle of Glenfiddich and
asked if that was what they had been drinking, and I said yes. Then with
one voice all the whisky drinkers started saying how wonderful it was, a
thought that hadn't occurred to them when they thought they were
drinking Vat 59.
The only valid taste test is a blind test.
Queue Lodder. "Not just blind, but double-blind test"
The should of course have said 'cue'.
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2018-10-11 14:44:10 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by occam
Post by occam
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Lewis
[ … ]
Post by Tony Cooper
Having established that, I have to admit that I do not understand
buying a bottle of hooch that is not to be consumed before buying
another bottle of the same type.
Identical bottles? Or just "all gin is the same" bottles?
In 1976 I visited my aunt in Toronto. I brought some duty-free
Glenfiddich with me. The first evening she gave a party to me some of
her friends (mostly academics from the U of T). To those who asked for
Scotch I gave Glenfiddich, but they didn't see the bottle, which was in
the kitchen. When it came time for refills my aunt told them to help
themselves. The first one came back with the bottle of Glenfiddich and
asked if that was what they had been drinking, and I said yes. Then with
one voice all the whisky drinkers started saying how wonderful it was, a
thought that hadn't occurred to them when they thought they were
drinking Vat 59.
The only valid taste test is a blind test.
Queue Lodder. "Not just blind, but double-blind test"
The should of course have said 'cue'.
Ah. That explains why I felt that something was wrong.
--
athel
J. J. Lodder
2018-10-11 13:30:14 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by occam
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Lewis
[ - ]
Post by Tony Cooper
Having established that, I have to admit that I do not understand
buying a bottle of hooch that is not to be consumed before buying
another bottle of the same type.
Identical bottles? Or just "all gin is the same" bottles?
In 1976 I visited my aunt in Toronto. I brought some duty-free
Glenfiddich with me. The first evening she gave a party to me some of
her friends (mostly academics from the U of T). To those who asked for
Scotch I gave Glenfiddich, but they didn't see the bottle, which was in
the kitchen. When it came time for refills my aunt told them to help
themselves. The first one came back with the bottle of Glenfiddich and
asked if that was what they had been drinking, and I said yes. Then with
one voice all the whisky drinkers started saying how wonderful it was, a
thought that hadn't occurred to them when they thought they were
drinking Vat 59.
The only valid taste test is a blind test.
Queue Lodder. "Not just blind, but double-blind test"
Drat. Up goes my relative entropy,

Jan
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2018-10-11 14:43:19 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by occam
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Lewis
[ … ]
Post by Tony Cooper
Having established that, I have to admit that I do not understand
buying a bottle of hooch that is not to be consumed before buying
another bottle of the same type.
Identical bottles? Or just "all gin is the same" bottles?
In 1976 I visited my aunt in Toronto. I brought some duty-free
Glenfiddich with me. The first evening she gave a party to me some of
her friends (mostly academics from the U of T). To those who asked for
Scotch I gave Glenfiddich, but they didn't see the bottle, which was in
the kitchen. When it came time for refills my aunt told them to help
themselves. The first one came back with the bottle of Glenfiddich and
asked if that was what they had been drinking, and I said yes. Then with
one voice all the whisky drinkers started saying how wonderful it was, a
thought that hadn't occurred to them when they thought they were
drinking Vat 59.
The only valid taste test is a blind test.
Queue Lodder. "Not just blind, but double-blind test"
Agreed. It was too much effort to write "double-".
--
athel
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2018-10-11 17:02:19 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by occam
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
[ ... ]
The only valid taste test is a blind test.
Queue Lodder. "Not just blind, but double-blind test"
Agreed. It was too much effort to write "double-".
After all, who has time to write things properly when one needs to
spend almost the whole of every day studying 'Arrison's posts in search
of something to comment on?
--
athel
Quinn C
2018-10-11 21:36:34 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by occam
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
The only valid taste test is a blind test.
Queue Lodder. "Not just blind, but double-blind test"
FIFO or FILO?
--
The bee must not pass judgment on the hive. (Voxish proverb)
-- Robert C. Wilson, Vortex (novel), p.125
Peter T. Daniels
2018-10-11 11:39:28 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Lewis
[ … ]
Post by Tony Cooper
Having established that, I have to admit that I do not understand
buying a bottle of hooch that is not to be consumed before buying
another bottle of the same type.
Identical bottles? Or just "all gin is the same" bottles?
In 1976 I visited my aunt in Toronto. I brought some duty-free
Glenfiddich with me. The first evening she gave a party to me some of
her friends (mostly academics from the U of T). To those who asked for
Scotch I gave Glenfiddich, but they didn't see the bottle, which was in
the kitchen. When it came time for refills my aunt told them to help
themselves. The first one came back with the bottle of Glenfiddich and
asked if that was what they had been drinking, and I said yes. Then
with one voice all the whisky drinkers started saying how wonderful it
was, a thought that hadn't occurred to them when they thought they were
drinking Vat 59.
The only valid taste test is a blind test.
Double-blind.

There's a story -- I think by T. C. Boyle -- that was on "Selected Shorts"
several times, about a wine-tasting party with huge stakes, and--
but there was an outcry about spoilers. Do enjoy it for yourselves!
J. J. Lodder
2018-10-11 13:30:13 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Lewis
[ - ]
Post by Tony Cooper
Having established that, I have to admit that I do not understand
buying a bottle of hooch that is not to be consumed before buying
another bottle of the same type.
Identical bottles? Or just "all gin is the same" bottles?
In 1976 I visited my aunt in Toronto. I brought some duty-free
Glenfiddich with me. The first evening she gave a party to me some of
her friends (mostly academics from the U of T). To those who asked for
Scotch I gave Glenfiddich, but they didn't see the bottle, which was in
the kitchen. When it came time for refills my aunt told them to help
themselves. The first one came back with the bottle of Glenfiddich and
asked if that was what they had been drinking, and I said yes. Then
with one voice all the whisky drinkers started saying how wonderful it
was, a thought that hadn't occurred to them when they thought they were
drinking Vat 59.
The only valid taste test is a blind test.
Double-blind.
There's a story -- I think by T. C. Boyle -- that was on "Selected Shorts"
several times, about a wine-tasting party with huge stakes, and--
but there was an outcry about spoilers. Do enjoy it for yourselves!
Roald Dahl wrote a wine-tasting story too,
also with huge stakes.
It's in 'Some Like You' if memory serves,

Jan
Madrigal Gurneyhalt
2018-10-11 13:44:32 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Lewis
[ - ]
Post by Tony Cooper
Having established that, I have to admit that I do not understand
buying a bottle of hooch that is not to be consumed before buying
another bottle of the same type.
Identical bottles? Or just "all gin is the same" bottles?
In 1976 I visited my aunt in Toronto. I brought some duty-free
Glenfiddich with me. The first evening she gave a party to me some of
her friends (mostly academics from the U of T). To those who asked for
Scotch I gave Glenfiddich, but they didn't see the bottle, which was in
the kitchen. When it came time for refills my aunt told them to help
themselves. The first one came back with the bottle of Glenfiddich and
asked if that was what they had been drinking, and I said yes. Then
with one voice all the whisky drinkers started saying how wonderful it
was, a thought that hadn't occurred to them when they thought they were
drinking Vat 59.
The only valid taste test is a blind test.
Double-blind.
There's a story -- I think by T. C. Boyle -- that was on "Selected Shorts"
several times, about a wine-tasting party with huge stakes, and--
but there was an outcry about spoilers. Do enjoy it for yourselves!
Roald Dahl wrote a wine-tasting story too,
also with huge stakes.
It's in 'Some Like You' if memory serves,
Tales of the Unexpected S2E5 with Ron Moody as the 'expert' who
wins his host's house and daughter in a bet on the identity of an
obscure vintage.
RHDraney
2018-10-11 15:08:35 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by Peter T. Daniels
There's a story -- I think by T. C. Boyle -- that was on "Selected Shorts"
several times, about a wine-tasting party with huge stakes, and--
but there was an outcry about spoilers. Do enjoy it for yourselves!
Roald Dahl wrote a wine-tasting story too,
also with huge stakes.
It's in 'Some Like You' if memory serves,
Tales of the Unexpected S2E5 with Ron Moody as the 'expert' who
wins his host's house and daughter in a bet on the identity of an
obscure vintage.
I was thinking of the one that ends with the exchange:

Taster: "That's piss!"
Host: "Yes, but whose?"

....r
Peter T. Daniels
2018-10-11 15:50:47 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
In 1976 I visited my aunt in Toronto. I brought some duty-free
Glenfiddich with me. The first evening she gave a party to me some of
her friends (mostly academics from the U of T). To those who asked for
Scotch I gave Glenfiddich, but they didn't see the bottle, which was in
the kitchen. When it came time for refills my aunt told them to help
themselves. The first one came back with the bottle of Glenfiddich and
asked if that was what they had been drinking, and I said yes. Then
with one voice all the whisky drinkers started saying how wonderful it
was, a thought that hadn't occurred to them when they thought they were
drinking Vat 59.
The only valid taste test is a blind test.
Double-blind.
There's a story -- I think by T. C. Boyle -- that was on "Selected Shorts"
several times, about a wine-tasting party with huge stakes, and--
but there was an outcry about spoilers. Do enjoy it for yourselves!
Roald Dahl wrote a wine-tasting story too,
also with huge stakes.
It's in 'Some Like You' if memory serves,
Tales of the Unexpected S2E5 with Ron Moody as the 'expert' who
wins his host's house and daughter in a bet on the identity of an
obscure vintage.
Looks like it was a pretty popular _topos_ at one time. Maybe still is.
Quinn C
2018-10-11 21:36:33 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by Peter T. Daniels
There's a story -- I think by T. C. Boyle -- that was on "Selected Shorts"
several times, about a wine-tasting party with huge stakes, and--
but there was an outcry about spoilers. Do enjoy it for yourselves!
Roald Dahl wrote a wine-tasting story too,
also with huge stakes.
It's in 'Some Like You' if memory serves,
Tales of the Unexpected S2E5 with Ron Moody as the 'expert' who
wins his host's house and daughter in a bet on the identity of an
obscure vintage.
Looks like it was a pretty popular _topos_ at one time. Maybe still is.
Winning daughters in bets, I hope less so.
--
If you kill one person, you go to jail; if you kill 20, you go
to an institution for the insane; if you kill 20,000, you get
political asylum. -- Reed Brody, special counsel
for prosecutions at Human Rights Watch
Katy Jennison
2018-10-10 00:34:38 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by bill van
Post by occam
Post by bill van
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Checking, I find that more than 25 countries produce the stuff, of
which some spell it whisky and some spell it whiskey, and some of
those who now spell it one way spelt it the other way in the past (the
USA, for example). Why should anyone apart from advertisers care?
I used to care when I was a whisk(e)y collector, albeit a minor one. If
you're interested in a subject,
you want to know all about it, and to get the details right should you
go on to write or talk about it.
Not so much now.
[Aside] You have stopped collecting, or drinking? If the latter, is your
collection open to offers? (I'm interested in most, except those
labelled Irish Whisky.)
Stopped collecting. My pension is somewhat less than my salary was
when I was working, and now I buy just a couple or three bottles of single malt
a year.
Before I retired, I'd have maybe 12 to 15 malts on hand at a given time,
at least half of them from south Islay, plus a few Canadian, Irish and
American whisk(e)ys.
I've been retired for something nearly eight years, and the collection has gone
the way of all single malts. Sláinte.
Seven from south Islay - respect!
--
Katy Jennison
Tony Cooper
2018-10-07 17:55:20 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sun, 7 Oct 2018 18:35:58 +0200, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by occam
Post by tonbei
re: back from
I have a question about the following sentences from a novel.
-------------------
"Can you get you anything to drink, Kay? I have some very good whisky I
bootlegged back from Ireland last month. I know you like Irish whisky."
--------------------------------
context: Governor's wife jokingly asked someone who was visiting the
official residence.
question: about "back from", specifically about usage of "back" here
What overtone is added with "back"?
Whoever wrote the novel didn't know that real Irish Whiskeys are not
spelled 'Whisky'.
Or didn't care. I know that the advertisers spell one one way and the
other the other, but I don't care which is which.
What's this? Someone made a mistake on the internet and we're not
supposed to care? An error has been exposed and you think it's
non-pounceable?

I'm filing a report with the Committee (if I can figure out how to do
this) that you are being derelict in proper pedantry.

If you continue to espouse such a slovenly approach we will have to
ask you take a "Time Out" from a.u.e. You may reside in France, but
such a laissez-faire attitude towards carelessness will not be
tolerated. We have Standards here.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Kerr-Mudd,John
2018-10-08 10:57:13 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sun, 07 Oct 2018 17:55:20 GMT, Tony Cooper
Post by Richard Yates
On Sun, 7 Oct 2018 18:35:58 +0200, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by occam
Post by tonbei
re: back from
I have a question about the following sentences from a novel.
-------------------
"Can you get you anything to drink, Kay? I have some very good
whisky I bootlegged back from Ireland last month. I know you like
Irish whisky." --------------------------------
context: Governor's wife jokingly asked someone who was visiting
the official residence.
question: about "back from", specifically about usage of "back"
here What overtone is added with "back"?
Whoever wrote the novel didn't know that real Irish Whiskeys are not
spelled 'Whisky'.
Or didn't care. I know that the advertisers spell one one way and the
other the other, but I don't care which is which.
What's this? Someone made a mistake on the internet and we're not
supposed to care? An error has been exposed and you think it's
non-pounceable?
I'm filing a report with the Committee (if I can figure out how to do
this) that you are being derelict in proper pedantry.
If you continue to espouse such a slovenly approach we will have to
Careful! the Slovenians might object to use of such language.
Post by Richard Yates
ask you take a "Time Out" from a.u.e. You may reside in France, but
such a laissez-faire attitude towards carelessness will not be
tolerated. We have Standards here.
--
Bah, and indeed, Humbug.
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2018-10-08 12:10:02 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
On Sun, 07 Oct 2018 17:55:20 GMT, Tony Cooper
[ ... ]
Post by Tony Cooper
I'm filing a report with the Committee (if I can figure out how to do
this) that you are being derelict in proper pedantry.
If you continue to espouse such a slovenly approach we will have to
Careful! the Slovenians might object to use of such language.
If the Slovenes use (almost) the same word to mean Slovene as the
Slovaks use to mean
Slovakn they cannot be too fussy about what others say. Both names,
incidentally, reflect the fact that Slovenes and Slovaks communicate
with the use of words, unlike their barbaric neighbours who just make
meaningless grunts.
--
athel
Peter Moylan
2018-10-08 13:35:09 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
On Sun, 07 Oct 2018 17:55:20 GMT, Tony Cooper
[ ... ]
Post by Tony Cooper
I'm filing a report with the Committee (if I can figure out how to do
this) that you are being derelict in proper pedantry.
If you continue to espouse such a slovenly approach we will have to
Careful! the Slovenians might object to use of such language.
If the Slovenes use (almost) the same word to mean Slovene as the
Slovaks use to mean
Slovakn they cannot be too fussy about what others say. Both names,
incidentally, reflect the fact that Slovenes and Slovaks communicate
with the use of words, unlike their barbaric neighbours who just make
meaningless grunts.
Where "barbaric" means the people who say "Bar bar bar, bar Barber Ann".
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Jerry Friedman
2018-10-08 17:25:31 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Richard Yates
On Sun, 7 Oct 2018 18:35:58 +0200, Athel Cornish-Bowden
...
Post by Richard Yates
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by occam
Whoever wrote the novel didn't know that real Irish Whiskeys are not
spelled 'Whisky'.
Or didn't care. I know that the advertisers spell one one way and the
other the other, but I don't care which is which.
What's this? Someone made a mistake on the internet and we're not
supposed to care? An error has been exposed and you think it's
non-pounceable?
I'm filing a report with the Committee (if I can figure out how to do
this) that you are being derelict in proper pedantry.
If you continue to espouse such a slovenly approach we will have to
ask you take a "Time Out" from a.u.e. You may reside in France, but
such a laissez-faire attitude towards carelessness will not be
tolerated. We have Standards here.
And the bloody standard is raised.
--
Jerry Friedman
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2018-10-07 19:06:42 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by occam
Post by tonbei
re: back from
I have a question about the following sentences from a novel.
-------------------
"Can you get you anything to drink, Kay? I have some very good whisky I bootlegged back from Ireland last month. I know you like Irish whisky."
--------------------------------
context: Governor's wife jokingly asked someone who was visiting the official residence.
question: about "back from", specifically about usage of "back" here
What overtone is added with "back"?
Whoever wrote the novel didn't know that real Irish Whiskeys are not
spelled 'Whisky'. That is the spelling of Scottish variety. 'back' is
unnecessary in that sentence.
The author might have thought that Whiskey was the American spelling and
that Whisky was the spelling from the other side of the pond.
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
occam
2018-10-07 19:25:26 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by occam
Post by tonbei
re: back from
I have a question about the following sentences from a novel.
-------------------
"Can you get you anything to drink, Kay? I have some very good whisky I bootlegged back from Ireland last month. I know you like Irish whisky."
--------------------------------
context: Governor's wife jokingly asked someone who was visiting the official residence.
question: about "back from", specifically about usage of "back" here
What overtone is added with "back"?
Whoever wrote the novel didn't know that real Irish Whiskeys are not
spelled 'Whisky'. That is the spelling of Scottish variety. 'back' is
unnecessary in that sentence.
The author might have thought that Whiskey was the American spelling and
that Whisky was the spelling from the other side of the pond.
If you have one fault Peter, it is that you are overly understanding and
forgiving :-)

http://lmgtfy.com/?q=Irish+whisky
Snidely
2018-10-11 09:12:19 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by tonbei
re: back from
I have a question about the following sentences from a novel.
-------------------
"Can you get you anything to drink, Kay? I have some very good whisky I
bootlegged back from Ireland last month. I know you like Irish whisky."
--------------------------------
context: Governor's wife jokingly asked someone who was visiting the
official residence. question: about "back from", specifically about usage
of "back" here What overtone is added with "back"?
[...] 'back' is
unnecessary in that sentence.
Perhaps unnecessary, but it does add an overtone. It emphasizes that
the speaker went there and returned here, illicitly conveying a certain
amount of regulated product during the return. It centers the "from"
on the speaker and the change in location.

/dps
--
The presence of this syntax results from the fact that SQLite is really
a Tcl extension that has escaped into the wild.
<http://www.sqlite.org/lang_expr.html>
Jack
2018-10-08 06:31:58 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by tonbei
re: back from
I have a question about the following sentences from a novel.
-------------------
"Can you get you anything to drink, Kay? I have some very good whisky I bootlegged back from Ireland last month. I know you like Irish whisky."
--------------------------------
context: Governor's wife jokingly asked someone who was visiting the official residence.
question: about "back from", specifically about usage of "back" here
What overtone is added with "back"?
It suggests the speaker carried it herself on a return trip from
Ireland.
--
John
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