Discussion:
smaller red cubes
(too old to reply)
a***@gmail.com
2019-01-15 06:59:56 UTC
Permalink
1) We went to cathedrals and churches in big cities as well as smaller rural
churches.

2) We went to cathedrals and churches in big cities as well as smaller village
churches.

3) We have blue cubes and smaller red cubes. So we have two sorts of cubes
that differ both in color and in size.

Are the above grammatical?
Are they idiomatic?
Have they been properly punctuated?
Do they make sense?

Gratefully,
Navi
Snidely
2019-01-15 07:13:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by a***@gmail.com
1) We went to cathedrals and churches in big cities as well as smaller rural
churches.
2) We went to cathedrals and churches in big cities as well as smaller
village churches.
3) We have blue cubes and smaller red cubes. So we have two sorts of cubes
that differ both in color and in size.
Are the above grammatical?
Are they idiomatic?
Have they been properly punctuated?
Do they make sense?
3 doesn't seem very likely to occur in conversation,
but I don't have any other objection to it.

Both 1 and 2 can be read as saying that some of
the cathedrals and churches we went to
were inside smaller [rural/village] churches,
which is maybe how the Time Lords figured out how to make a Tardis.

Normal reading would not stumble that way, of course,
but calling attention to the structure of the sentences
(as your post does)
brings to light the opportunity to be absurb.

/dps
--
Maybe C282Y is simply one of the hangers-on, a groupie following a
future guitar god of the human genome: an allele with undiscovered
virtuosity, currently soloing in obscurity in Mom's garage.
Bradley Wertheim, theAtlantic.com, Jan 10 2013
Peter T. Daniels
2019-01-15 15:07:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by Snidely
Post by a***@gmail.com
1) We went to cathedrals and churches in big cities as well as smaller rural
churches.
2) We went to cathedrals and churches in big cities as well as smaller
village churches.
3) We have blue cubes and smaller red cubes. So we have two sorts of cubes
that differ both in color and in size.
Are the above grammatical?
Are they idiomatic?
Have they been properly punctuated?
Do they make sense?
3 doesn't seem very likely to occur in conversation,
but I don't have any other objection to it.
Happily, my class was the last one that wasn't exposed to "the New Math,"
in which arithmetic was supposedly taught by having children play with
wooden blocks of unit size and multiples of the unit size; and the different
sizes were different colors. Those toys could be introduced by the teacher
with discourse very like (3). They were called "Cuisinaire Rods," and they
came in at the same time as the Cuisinart food processor, so of course ...
They weren't nearly so elaborate as the "Froebel blocks" on which Frank
Lloyd Wright's mother trained him in playing/working with spatial relationships.

Nowadays, children are apparently not asked to learn to "cipher," as Mark
Twain may have called it, at all, but taught to rely on their phone-
calculators.
Post by Snidely
Both 1 and 2 can be read as saying that some of
the cathedrals and churches we went to
were inside smaller [rural/village] churches,
well ...
Post by Snidely
which is maybe how the Time Lords figured out how to make a Tardis.
Does the C of E also permeate The Doctor's universe?
Post by Snidely
Normal reading would not stumble that way, of course,
but calling attention to the structure of the sentences
(as your post does)
brings to light the opportunity to be absurb.
I wonder what he's getting at in (1) vs. (2): as if Adj+N would have some
different function in an interpretation than N+N?
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2019-01-16 09:13:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by Snidely
Post by a***@gmail.com
1) We went to cathedrals and churches in big cities as well as smaller rural
churches.
2) We went to cathedrals and churches in big cities as well as smaller
village churches.
3) We have blue cubes and smaller red cubes. So we have two sorts of cubes
that differ both in color and in size.
Are the above grammatical?
Are they idiomatic?
Have they been properly punctuated?
Do they make sense?
3 doesn't seem very likely to occur in conversation,
but I don't have any other objection to it.
Both 1 and 2 can be read as saying that some of
the cathedrals and churches we went to
were inside smaller [rural/village] churches,
which is maybe how the Time Lords figured out how to make a Tardis.
It's not that common to find a church inside another church, though
there is one in Assisi (at least, there was before the earthquake: I'm
not sure if there is now), and there is a cathedral inside the great
mosque of Córdoba.

(Whooshed, I know.)
Post by Snidely
Normal reading would not stumble that way, of course,
but calling attention to the structure of the sentences
(as your post does)
brings to light the opportunity to be absurb.
/dps
--
athel
Snidely
2019-01-16 09:16:38 UTC
Permalink
On Wednesday or thereabouts, Athel Cornish-Bowden asked ...
Post by Snidely
Post by a***@gmail.com
1) We went to cathedrals and churches in big cities as well as smaller rural
churches.
2) We went to cathedrals and churches in big cities as well as smaller
village churches.
3) We have blue cubes and smaller red cubes. So we have two sorts of cubes
that differ both in color and in size.
Are the above grammatical?
Are they idiomatic?
Have they been properly punctuated?
Do they make sense?
3 doesn't seem very likely to occur in conversation,
but I don't have any other objection to it.
Both 1 and 2 can be read as saying that some of
the cathedrals and churches we went to
were inside smaller [rural/village] churches,
which is maybe how the Time Lords figured out how to make a Tardis.
It's not that common to find a church inside another church, though there is
one in Assisi (at least, there was before the earthquake: I'm not sure if
there is now), and there is a cathedral inside the great mosque of Córdoba.
(Whooshed, I know.)
Ah, the wings of the bird might be for someone else if the cathedral is
bigger than the mosque.
Post by Snidely
Normal reading would not stumble that way, of course,
but calling attention to the structure of the sentences
(as your post does)
brings to light the opportunity to be absurb.
/dps
--
But happiness cannot be pursued; it must ensue. One must have a reason
to 'be happy.'"
Viktor Frankl
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2019-01-16 09:33:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by Snidely
On Wednesday or thereabouts, Athel Cornish-Bowden asked ...
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Snidely
Post by a***@gmail.com
1) We went to cathedrals and churches in big cities as well as smaller rural
churches.
2) We went to cathedrals and churches in big cities as well as smaller
village churches.
3) We have blue cubes and smaller red cubes. So we have two sorts of cubes
that differ both in color and in size.
Are the above grammatical?
Are they idiomatic?
Have they been properly punctuated?
Do they make sense?
3 doesn't seem very likely to occur in conversation,
but I don't have any other objection to it.
Both 1 and 2 can be read as saying that some of
the cathedrals and churches we went to
were inside smaller [rural/village] churches,
which is maybe how the Time Lords figured out how to make a Tardis.
It's not that common to find a church inside another church, though
there is one in Assisi (at least, there was before the earthquake: I'm
not sure if there is now), and there is a cathedral inside the great
mosque of Córdoba.
(Whooshed, I know.)
Ah, the wings of the bird might be for someone else if the cathedral is
bigger than the mosque.
The cathedral in Córdoba makes you realize how big the mosque is,
because it's quite big itself. The king at the time it was built
(Ferdinand III I think; no Muslim he) was disgusted with it: "you have
taken something marvellous and turned it into something ordinary." (I
can't find the actual words, but they were something like that.)
Post by Snidely
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Snidely
Normal reading would not stumble that way, of course,
but calling attention to the structure of the sentences
(as your post does)
brings to light the opportunity to be absurb.
/dps
--
athel
Peter T. Daniels
2019-01-16 14:01:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Snidely
Post by a***@gmail.com
1) We went to cathedrals and churches in big cities as well as smaller rural
churches.
2) We went to cathedrals and churches in big cities as well as smaller
village churches.
3) We have blue cubes and smaller red cubes. So we have two sorts of cubes
that differ both in color and in size.
Are the above grammatical?
Are they idiomatic?
Have they been properly punctuated?
Do they make sense?
3 doesn't seem very likely to occur in conversation,
but I don't have any other objection to it.
Both 1 and 2 can be read as saying that some of
the cathedrals and churches we went to
were inside smaller [rural/village] churches,
which is maybe how the Time Lords figured out how to make a Tardis.
It's not that common to find a church inside another church, though
there is one in Assisi (at least, there was before the earthquake: I'm
not sure if there is now), and there is a cathedral inside the great
mosque of Córdoba.
(Whooshed, I know.)
And you might say that the Dome of the Rock and al-Aqsa Mosque are
"inside" the Temple in Jerusalem.
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Snidely
Normal reading would not stumble that way, of course,
but calling attention to the structure of the sentences
(as your post does)
brings to light the opportunity to be absurb.
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2019-01-16 18:10:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Snidely
Post by a***@gmail.com
1) We went to cathedrals and churches in big cities as well as smaller rural
churches.> >> 2) We went to cathedrals and churches in big cities as
well as smaller> >> village churches.
3) We have blue cubes and smaller red cubes. So we have two sorts of cubes
that differ both in color and in size.
Are the above grammatical?
Are they idiomatic?
Have they been properly punctuated?
Do they make sense?
3 doesn't seem very likely to occur in conversation,
but I don't have any other objection to it.
Both 1 and 2 can be read as saying that some of
the cathedrals and churches we went to
were inside smaller [rural/village] churches,
which is maybe how the Time Lords figured out how to make a Tardis.
It's not that common to find a church inside another church, though>
there is one in Assisi (at least, there was before the earthquake: I'm>
not sure if there is now), and there is a cathedral inside the great>
mosque of Córdoba.
(Whooshed, I know.)
And you might say that the Dome of the Rock and al-Aqsa Mosque
are"inside" the Temple in Jerusalem.
I wouldn't but maybe you would. The Basilica in Assisi and the Great
Mosque in Córdoba are actual buildings, and the places of worship
inside them are actual buldings underneath their ceilings.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Snidely
Normal reading would not stumble that way, of course,
but calling attention to the structure of the sentences
(as your post does)
brings to light the opportunity to be absurb.
--
athel
Peter T. Daniels
2019-01-16 19:21:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Snidely
Post by a***@gmail.com
1) We went to cathedrals and churches in big cities as well as smaller rural
churches.> >> 2) We went to cathedrals and churches in big cities as
well as smaller> >> village churches.
3) We have blue cubes and smaller red cubes. So we have two sorts of cubes
that differ both in color and in size.
Are the above grammatical?
Are they idiomatic?
Have they been properly punctuated?
Do they make sense?
3 doesn't seem very likely to occur in conversation,
but I don't have any other objection to it.
Both 1 and 2 can be read as saying that some of
the cathedrals and churches we went to
were inside smaller [rural/village] churches,
which is maybe how the Time Lords figured out how to make a Tardis.
It's not that common to find a church inside another church, though>
there is one in Assisi (at least, there was before the earthquake: I'm>
not sure if there is now), and there is a cathedral inside the great>
mosque of Córdoba.
(Whooshed, I know.)
And you might say that the Dome of the Rock and al-Aqsa Mosque
are"inside" the Temple in Jerusalem.
I wouldn't but maybe you would.
They're within the walls. I've looked down on them from the Mount of
Olives. (Windiest place I've ever been.)
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
The Basilica in Assisi and the Great
Mosque in Córdoba are actual buildings, and the places of worship
inside them are actual buldings underneath their ceilings.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Snidely
Normal reading would not stumble that way, of course,
but calling attention to the structure of the sentences
(as your post does)
brings to light the opportunity to be absurb.
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2019-01-17 07:33:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Snidely
Post by a***@gmail.com
1) We went to cathedrals and churches in big cities as well as smaller rural
churches.> >> 2) We went to cathedrals and churches in big cities as>
Post by a***@gmail.com
well as smaller> >> village churches.
3) We have blue cubes and smaller red cubes. So we have two sorts of cubes
that differ both in color and in size.
Are the above grammatical?
Are they idiomatic?
Have they been properly punctuated?
Do they make sense?
3 doesn't seem very likely to occur in conversation,
but I don't have any other objection to it.
Both 1 and 2 can be read as saying that some of
the cathedrals and churches we went to
were inside smaller [rural/village] churches,
which is maybe how the Time Lords figured out how to make a Tardis.
It's not that common to find a church inside another church, though>>
I'm>> >> not sure if there is now), and there is a cathedral inside the
great>> >> mosque of Córdoba.
(Whooshed, I know.)
And you might say that the Dome of the Rock and al-Aqsa Mosque> >
are"inside" the Temple in Jerusalem.
I wouldn't but maybe you would.
They're within the walls. I've looked down on them from the Mount
ofOlives. (Windiest place I've ever been.)
Hmm, if you come to Marseilles and visit Notre Dame de la Garde on a
day of Mistral you'll find that places can be windier than that.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
The Basilica in Assisi and the Great> Mosque in Córdoba are actual
buildings, and the places of worship> inside them are actual buldings
underneath their ceilings.
Post by Snidely
Normal reading would not stumble that way, of course,
but calling attention to the structure of the sentences
(as your post does)
brings to light the opportunity to be absurb.
--
athel
Madrigal Gurneyhalt
2019-01-17 11:44:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Snidely
Post by a***@gmail.com
1) We went to cathedrals and churches in big cities as well as smaller rural
churches.> >> 2) We went to cathedrals and churches in big cities as>
Post by a***@gmail.com
well as smaller> >> village churches.
3) We have blue cubes and smaller red cubes. So we have two sorts of cubes
that differ both in color and in size.
Are the above grammatical?
Are they idiomatic?
Have they been properly punctuated?
Do they make sense?
3 doesn't seem very likely to occur in conversation,
but I don't have any other objection to it.
Both 1 and 2 can be read as saying that some of
the cathedrals and churches we went to
were inside smaller [rural/village] churches,
which is maybe how the Time Lords figured out how to make a Tardis.
It's not that common to find a church inside another church, though>>
I'm>> >> not sure if there is now), and there is a cathedral inside the
great>> >> mosque of Córdoba.
(Whooshed, I know.)
And you might say that the Dome of the Rock and al-Aqsa Mosque> >
are"inside" the Temple in Jerusalem.
I wouldn't but maybe you would.
They're within the walls. I've looked down on them from the Mount
ofOlives. (Windiest place I've ever been.)
Hmm, if you come to Marseilles and visit Notre Dame de la Garde on a
day of Mistral you'll find that places can be windier than that.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
The Basilica in Assisi and the Great> Mosque in Córdoba are actual
buildings, and the places of worship> inside them are actual buldings
underneath their ceilings.
Post by Snidely
Normal reading would not stumble that way, of course,
but calling attention to the structure of the sentences
(as your post does)
brings to light the opportunity to be absurb.
Pah! Call that windy?


Athel Cornish-Bowden
2019-01-17 14:52:36 UTC
Permalink
On 2019-01-17 12:44:36 +0100, Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by a***@gmail.com
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
On Wednesday, January 16, 2019 at 1:10:06 PM UTC-5, Athel Cornish-Bowde
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
On Wednesday, January 16, 2019 at 4:13:30 AM UTC-5, Athel Cornish-Bow
Post by Snidely
Post by a***@gmail.com
1) We went to cathedrals and churches in big cities as well as sma
ller rural
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Snidely
Post by a***@gmail.com
churches.> >> 2) We went to cathedrals and churches in big cities
as>
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Snidely
Post by a***@gmail.com
Post by a***@gmail.com
well as smaller> >> village churches.
3) We have blue cubes and smaller red cubes. So we have two sorts
of cubes
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Snidely
Post by a***@gmail.com
that differ both in color and in size.
Are the above grammatical?
Are they idiomatic?
Have they been properly punctuated?
Do they make sense?
3 doesn't seem very likely to occur in conversation,
but I don't have any other objection to it.
Both 1 and 2 can be read as saying that some of
the cathedrals and churches we went to
were inside smaller [rural/village] churches,
which is maybe how the Time Lords figured out how to make a Tardis.
It's not that common to find a church inside another church, though>
Post by Snidely
Post by a***@gmail.com
there is one in Assisi (at least, there was before the earthquake
I'm>> >> not sure if there is now), and there is a cathedral inside
the
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
great>> >> mosque of Córdoba.
(Whooshed, I know.)
And you might say that the Dome of the Rock and al-Aqsa Mosque> >
are"inside" the Temple in Jerusalem.
I wouldn't but maybe you would.
They're within the walls. I've looked down on them from the Mount
ofOlives. (Windiest place I've ever been.)
Hmm, if you come to Marseilles and visit Notre Dame de la Garde on a
day of Mistral you'll find that places can be windier than that.
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
The Basilica in Assisi and the Great> Mosque in Córdoba are actua
l
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
buildings, and the places of worship> inside them are actual buldings
underneath their ceilings.
Post by Snidely
Normal reading would not stumble that way, of course,
but calling attention to the structure of the sentences
(as your post does)
brings to light the opportunity to be absurb.
Pah! Call that windy?
http://youtu.be/P-QZ5Om9_20
OK, point taken, but I think PTD was thinking of more urban locations
than Mount Washington, and so was I.
--
athel
Peter T. Daniels
2019-01-17 16:50:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
On 2019-01-17 12:44:36 +0100, Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
On Wednesday, January 16, 2019 at 1:10:06 PM UTC-5, Athel Cornish-Bowde
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
On Wednesday, January 16, 2019 at 4:13:30 AM UTC-5, Athel Cornish-Bow
It's not that common to find a church inside another church, though>
I'm>> >> not sure if there is now), and there is a cathedral inside
the
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
great>> >> mosque of Córdoba.
(Whooshed, I know.)
And you might say that the Dome of the Rock and al-Aqsa Mosque
are "inside" the Temple in Jerusalem.
I wouldn't but maybe you would.
Note that "inside" was in scare quotes.
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
They're within the walls. I've looked down on them from the Mount
ofOlives. (Windiest place I've ever been.)
Hmm, if you come to Marseilles and visit Notre Dame de la Garde on a
day of Mistral you'll find that places can be windier than that.
Is it up on the side of a mountain, getting the full force of whatever's
been gathering across the entire width of the Mediterranean?
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Pah! Call that windy?
http://youtu.be/P-QZ5Om9_20
OK, point taken, but I think PTD was thinking of more urban locations
than Mount Washington, and so was I.
Mount Washington, NH, is where the strongest wind ever recorded (in the
US? anywhere on earth?) was recorded. It was quite a while ago.
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2019-01-17 17:21:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
On 2019-01-17 12:44:36 +0100, Madrigal Gurneyhalt>
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
On Wednesday, January 16, 2019 at 1:10:06 PM UTC-5, Athel Cornish-Bowde
On 2019-01-16 14:01:10 +0000, Peter T. Daniels said:> >>>>> On
Wednesday, January 16, 2019 at 4:13:30 AM UTC-5, Athel Cornish-Bow
Post by Peter T. Daniels
It's not that common to find a church inside another church, though>
I'm>> >> not sure if there is now), and there is a cathedral inside
the
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Peter T. Daniels
great>> >> mosque of Córdoba.
(Whooshed, I know.)
And you might say that the Dome of the Rock and al-Aqsa Mosque
are "inside" the Temple in Jerusalem.
I wouldn't but maybe you would.
Note that "inside" was in scare quotes.
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
They're within the walls. I've looked down on them from the Mount
ofOlives. (Windiest place I've ever been.)
Hmm, if you come to Marseilles and visit Notre Dame de la Garde on a
day of Mistral you'll find that places can be windier than that.
Is it up on the side of a mountain, getting the full force of
whatever'sbeen gathering across the entire width of the Mediterranean?
Not a mountain -- we don't have real mountains until you get to the
Alps or the Pyrenees -- but the top of a very steep hill. The strongest
winds come from the north and feel very cold. Those from across the
Mediterranean are much warmer, wetter and dirtier. I suppose they get
up to full force occasionally, but mostly they don't.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Pah! Call that windy?
http://youtu.be/P-QZ5Om9_20
OK, point taken, but I think PTD was thinking of more urban locations>
than Mount Washington, and so was I.
Mount Washington, NH, is where the strongest wind ever recorded (in
theUS? anywhere on earth?) was recorded. It was quite a while ago.
Maddy's video just said "Mount Washington", but it's probably the one you mean.
--
athel
Sam Plusnet
2019-01-17 19:15:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Pah! Call that windy?
http://youtu.be/P-QZ5Om9_20
OK, point taken, but I think PTD was thinking of more urban locations
than Mount Washington, and so was I.
I suppose the small wall and railings would stop him from being blown away.
What was the wind speed whilst the wall and railing were being built?
--
Sam Plusnet
Jack
2019-01-15 18:42:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by a***@gmail.com
1) We went to cathedrals and churches in big cities as well as smaller rural
churches.
2) We went to cathedrals and churches in big cities as well as smaller village
churches.
Those seem like possible answers to questions about the scope of your
tourism. You might put a comma after 'citiies'.
Post by a***@gmail.com
3) We have blue cubes and smaller red cubes. So we have two sorts of cubes
that differ both in color and in size.
A reasonable answer to "Are all your cubes the same?". It could be
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