Discussion:
more avian entities
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Peter T. Daniels
2021-12-03 15:53:12 UTC
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[this was actually yesterday, and I forgot to post it]

The seagulls were back this morning -- quite a flock mostly walking
around on the pavement. They reluctantly moved out of the way
when a car came down the aisle.

But wait ... many had gray wings when folded; and some had a
different sort of head and neck. The head more rounded than a
normal gull's, and a compact S-shaped neck. (I didn't see any of
them extend it.)

That was probably around 8:40. Again, when I left about 9:20,
no birds but not all that many more cars.
Jerry Friedman
2021-12-03 17:32:18 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
[this was actually yesterday, and I forgot to post it]
The seagulls were back this morning -- quite a flock mostly walking
around on the pavement. They reluctantly moved out of the way
when a car came down the aisle.
But wait ... many had gray wings when folded; and some had a
different sort of head and neck. The head more rounded than a
normal gull's, and a compact S-shaped neck. (I didn't see any of
them extend it.)
...

I think the common species there at this time of year would be Herring
Gulls and Ring-billed Gulls, though other species are possible. The
ones with plain gray wings would be adults or due to become adults
this spring. The brownish or mottled ones would be younger.

Gull identification is difficult because there are many similar species,
which change considerably from juvenile to adult, and are quite variable
individually, especially at earlier ages. If you're interested in learning
more, allaboutbirds.org (from a land-grant college somewhere in
upstate New York) is an excellent resource.
--
Jerry Friedman
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