Discussion:
much of which
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Lazypierrot
2021-01-24 15:58:40 UTC
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I would like to know what "much of which" refers to in the following passage.
I suppose it refers to "clothing", rather than "overproduction of clothing", because "overproduction" expresses a kind of action and cannot be measured much or little.


Fast fashion has experienced a boom in recent decades, as fashion-conscious shoppers became enthusiastic about having the latest look. But it also results in overproduction of clothing, much of which is never consumed.


Cordially,

LP
David Kleinecke
2021-01-24 16:44:44 UTC
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Post by Lazypierrot
I would like to know what "much of which" refers to in the following passage.
I suppose it refers to "clothing", rather than "overproduction of clothing", because "overproduction" expresses a kind of action and cannot be measured much or little.
Fast fashion has experienced a boom in recent decades, as fashion-conscious shoppers became enthusiastic about having the latest look. But it also results in overproduction of clothing, much of which is never consumed.
You are right. Perhaps for the wrong reason.
Peter T. Daniels
2021-01-24 17:09:23 UTC
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Post by Lazypierrot
I would like to know what "much of which" refers to in the following passage.
I suppose it refers to "clothing", rather than "overproduction of clothing", because "overproduction" expresses a kind of action and cannot be measured much or little.
Fast fashion has experienced a boom in recent decades, as fashion-conscious shoppers became enthusiastic about having the latest look. But it also results in overproduction of clothing, much of which is never consumed.
What is not consumed is the excess product that resulted
from overproduction.

The product happens to be clothing, but the sentence would
not be unclear if "of clothing" were omitted. In that case, the
overproduction would be taken to be "fashion," as in "she always
wears the latest fashions."
Bebercito
2021-01-24 18:02:18 UTC
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Post by Lazypierrot
I would like to know what "much of which" refers to in the following passage.
I suppose it refers to "clothing", rather than "overproduction of clothing", because "overproduction" expresses a kind of action and cannot be measured much or little.
Fast fashion has experienced a boom in recent decades, as fashion-conscious shoppers became enthusiastic about having the latest look. But it also results in overproduction of clothing, much of which is never consumed.
"Overproduction", if only because "consume" isn't a suitable verb for "clothing".
Post by Lazypierrot
Cordially,
LP
Snidely
2021-01-24 19:51:49 UTC
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Post by Bebercito
Post by Lazypierrot
I would like to know what "much of which" refers to in the following
passage. I suppose it refers to "clothing", rather than "overproduction of
clothing", because "overproduction" expresses a kind of action and cannot be
measured much or little.
Fast fashion has experienced a boom in recent decades, as fashion-conscious
shoppers became enthusiastic about having the latest look. But it also
results in overproduction of clothing, much of which is never consumed.
"Overproduction", if only because "consume" isn't a suitable verb for "clothing".
?

One consumes clothing by buying it. That makes one a consumer, and
this is a consumer economy.

/dps
--
Trust, but verify.
Bebercito
2021-01-24 21:00:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bebercito
Post by Lazypierrot
I would like to know what "much of which" refers to in the following
passage. I suppose it refers to "clothing", rather than "overproduction of
clothing", because "overproduction" expresses a kind of action and cannot be
measured much or little.
Fast fashion has experienced a boom in recent decades, as fashion-conscious
shoppers became enthusiastic about having the latest look. But it also
results in overproduction of clothing, much of which is never consumed.
"Overproduction", if only because "consume" isn't a suitable verb for "clothing".
?
One consumes clothing by buying it. That makes one a consumer, and
this is a consumer economy.
Still, "consume" sounds a bit odd with "clothing", but quite natural
with "(over)production". Googling confirms that, as instances of
the former case are pretty uncommon.
/dps
--
Trust, but verify.
Horace LaBadie
2021-01-24 19:57:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bebercito
Post by Lazypierrot
I would like to know what "much of which" refers to in the following passage.
I suppose it refers to "clothing", rather than "overproduction of
clothing", because "overproduction" expresses a kind of action and cannot
be measured much or little.
Fast fashion has experienced a boom in recent decades, as fashion-conscious
shoppers became enthusiastic about having the latest look. But it also
results in overproduction of clothing, much of which is never consumed.
"Overproduction", if only because "consume" isn't a suitable verb for "clothing".
IIt is in econmoics. It is a term of art.

Consumer goods are consumed by buyers for personal use. Also known as
final goods. It includes everything material, from automobiles to
zithers, sold to people.
Peter T. Daniels
2021-01-24 20:19:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Bebercito
Post by Lazypierrot
I would like to know what "much of which" refers to in the following passage.
I suppose it refers to "clothing", rather than "overproduction of
clothing", because "overproduction" expresses a kind of action and cannot
be measured much or little.
Fast fashion has experienced a boom in recent decades, as fashion-conscious
shoppers became enthusiastic about having the latest look. But it also
results in overproduction of clothing, much of which is never consumed.
"Overproduction", if only because "consume" isn't a suitable verb for "clothing".
IIt is in econmoics. It is a term of art.
Consumer goods are consumed by buyers for personal use. Also known as
final goods. It includes everything material, from automobiles to
zithers, sold to people.
What about abaci and zymurgics? (or even zucchini.)
Horace LaBadie
2021-01-24 23:41:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Bebercito
Post by Lazypierrot
I would like to know what "much of which" refers to in the following passage.
I suppose it refers to "clothing", rather than "overproduction of
clothing", because "overproduction" expresses a kind of action and cannot
be measured much or little.
Fast fashion has experienced a boom in recent decades, as fashion-conscious
shoppers became enthusiastic about having the latest look. But it also
results in overproduction of clothing, much of which is never consumed.
"Overproduction", if only because "consume" isn't a suitable verb for "clothing".
IIt is in econmoics. It is a term of art.
Consumer goods are consumed by buyers for personal use. Also known as
final goods. It includes everything material, from automobiles to
zithers, sold to people.
What about abaci and zymurgics? (or even zucchini.)
Except homebrewed and consumed zymurgics.
Peter T. Daniels
2021-01-25 13:44:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Bebercito
Post by Lazypierrot
I would like to know what "much of which" refers to in the following
passage.
I suppose it refers to "clothing", rather than "overproduction of
clothing", because "overproduction" expresses a kind of action and cannot
be measured much or little.
Fast fashion has experienced a boom in recent decades, as fashion-conscious
shoppers became enthusiastic about having the latest look. But it also
results in overproduction of clothing, much of which is never consumed.
"Overproduction", if only because "consume" isn't a suitable verb for
"clothing".
IIt is in econmoics. It is a term of art.
Consumer goods are consumed by buyers for personal use. Also known as
final goods. It includes everything material, from automobiles to
zithers, sold to people.
What about abaci and zymurgics? (or even zucchini.)
Except homebrewed and consumed zymurgics.
A tax evasion scheme, pure and simple!

(Interesting hendiadys, that.)

Lewis
2021-01-24 23:22:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bebercito
Post by Lazypierrot
I would like to know what "much of which" refers to in the following passage.
I suppose it refers to "clothing", rather than "overproduction of clothing", because "overproduction" expresses a kind of action and cannot be measured much or little.
Fast fashion has experienced a boom in recent decades, as fashion-conscious shoppers became enthusiastic about having the latest look. But it also results in overproduction of clothing, much of which is never consumed.
"Overproduction", if only because "consume" isn't a suitable verb for "clothing".
Wherever did you get that idea? While consume means to eat or drink, it
also means to buy goods, to use up, completely destroy, and to be
obsessively distracted by something.
--
I don't need no stinking taglines.
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