Discussion:
Joe/jo?
(too old to reply)
Will Parsons
2019-01-13 04:45:46 UTC
Permalink
My jo(e)?

To-night, my wife wanted to watch a Christmasy-type movie, so she
settled on "White Christmas". In one song in the movie, Rosemary
Clooney uses the term Joe/jo [dʒou] to refer (apparently) to a
sweetheart. Now, to those of us who grew up with the poems of Robert
Burns, this use of "jo" is quite familiar. But in 1954 (when "White
Christmas" was made), was this usage familiar to Americans? Or should
this be an (unknown to me) use of the proper name "Joe" in some sort
of generic sense?
--
Will
RHDraney
2019-01-13 06:23:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by Will Parsons
My jo(e)?
To-night, my wife wanted to watch a Christmasy-type movie, so she
settled on "White Christmas". In one song in the movie, Rosemary
Clooney uses the term Joe/jo [dʒou] to refer (apparently) to a
sweetheart. Now, to those of us who grew up with the poems of Robert
Burns, this use of "jo" is quite familiar. But in 1954 (when "White
Christmas" was made), was this usage familiar to Americans? Or should
this be an (unknown to me) use of the proper name "Joe" in some sort
of generic sense?
Knowing Clooney and her oeuvre, it's probably GI Joe....r
Horace LaBadie
2019-01-13 06:39:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by Will Parsons
My jo(e)?
To-night, my wife wanted to watch a Christmasy-type movie, so she
settled on "White Christmas". In one song in the movie, Rosemary
Clooney uses the term Joe/jo [d?ou] to refer (apparently) to a
sweetheart. Now, to those of us who grew up with the poems of Robert
Burns, this use of "jo" is quite familiar. But in 1954 (when "White
Christmas" was made), was this usage familiar to Americans? Or should
this be an (unknown to me) use of the proper name "Joe" in some sort
of generic sense?
Joe is generic.

He can be found in lots of songs.

e.g., One For My Baby (And One More for the Road.)
So set 'em up Joe...

Or the truly generic Joe Blow.
John Varela
2019-01-13 22:27:36 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 13 Jan 2019 06:39:59 UTC, Horace LaBadie
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Will Parsons
My jo(e)?
To-night, my wife wanted to watch a Christmasy-type movie, so she
settled on "White Christmas". In one song in the movie, Rosemary
Clooney uses the term Joe/jo [d?ou] to refer (apparently) to a
sweetheart. Now, to those of us who grew up with the poems of Robert
Burns, this use of "jo" is quite familiar. But in 1954 (when "White
Christmas" was made), was this usage familiar to Americans? Or should
this be an (unknown to me) use of the proper name "Joe" in some sort
of generic sense?
Joe is generic.
He can be found in lots of songs.
e.g., One For My Baby (And One More for the Road.)
So set 'em up Joe...
Or the truly generic Joe Blow.
"He's a good Joe," or "...good ol' Joe".
--
John Varela
Sam Plusnet
2019-01-14 00:54:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by John Varela
On Sun, 13 Jan 2019 06:39:59 UTC, Horace LaBadie
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Will Parsons
My jo(e)?
To-night, my wife wanted to watch a Christmasy-type movie, so she
settled on "White Christmas". In one song in the movie, Rosemary
Clooney uses the term Joe/jo [d?ou] to refer (apparently) to a
sweetheart. Now, to those of us who grew up with the poems of Robert
Burns, this use of "jo" is quite familiar. But in 1954 (when "White
Christmas" was made), was this usage familiar to Americans? Or should
this be an (unknown to me) use of the proper name "Joe" in some sort
of generic sense?
Joe is generic.
He can be found in lots of songs.
e.g., One For My Baby (And One More for the Road.)
So set 'em up Joe...
Or the truly generic Joe Blow.
"He's a good Joe," or "...good ol' Joe".
In the UK, during WWII, cries of "Good old Joe!" referred to Stalin.

Such a nice chap.
--
Sam Plusnet
Kerr-Mudd,John
2019-01-14 11:02:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by John Varela
On Sun, 13 Jan 2019 06:39:59 UTC, Horace LaBadie
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Will Parsons
My jo(e)?
To-night, my wife wanted to watch a Christmasy-type movie, so she
settled on "White Christmas". In one song in the movie, Rosemary
Clooney uses the term Joe/jo [d?ou] to refer (apparently) to a
sweetheart. Now, to those of us who grew up with the poems of Robert
Burns, this use of "jo" is quite familiar. But in 1954 (when "White
Christmas" was made), was this usage familiar to Americans? Or should
this be an (unknown to me) use of the proper name "Joe" in some sort
of generic sense?
Joe is generic.
He can be found in lots of songs.
e.g., One For My Baby (And One More for the Road.)
So set 'em up Joe...
Or the truly generic Joe Blow.
"He's a good Joe," or "...good ol' Joe".
In the UK, during WWII, cries of "Good old Joe!" referred to Stalin.
Such a nice chap.
We needed him on side to avoid being part of a Greater Germany.
--
Bah, and indeed, Humbug.
CDB
2019-01-14 13:14:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by John Varela
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Will Parsons
My jo(e)?
To-night, my wife wanted to watch a Christmasy-type movie, so
she settled on "White Christmas". In one song in the movie,
Rosemary Clooney uses the term Joe/jo [d?ou] to refer
(apparently) to a sweetheart. Now, to those of us who grew up
with the poems of Robert Burns, this use of "jo" is quite
familiar. But in 1954 (when "White Christmas" was made), was
this usage familiar to Americans? Or should this be an (unknown
to me) use of the proper name "Joe" in some sort of generic
sense?
Joe is generic.
He can be found in lots of songs.
e.g., One For My Baby (And One More for the Road.) So set 'em up
Joe...
Or the truly generic Joe Blow.
"He's a good Joe," or "...good ol' Joe".
Not to mention Joe College, Joe Cool, Joe Lunchpail, and Joe Fresh (TM).
Jerry Friedman
2019-01-14 14:49:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by CDB
Post by John Varela
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Will Parsons
My jo(e)?
To-night, my wife wanted to watch a Christmasy-type movie, so
she settled on "White Christmas".  In one song in the movie,
Rosemary Clooney uses the term Joe/jo [d?ou] to refer
(apparently) to a sweetheart.  Now, to those of us who grew up
with the poems of Robert Burns, this use of "jo" is quite
familiar.  But in 1954 (when "White Christmas" was made), was
this usage familiar to Americans?  Or should this be an (unknown
to me) use of the proper name "Joe" in some sort of generic
sense?
Joe is generic.
He can be found in lots of songs.
e.g., One For My Baby (And One More for the Road.) So set 'em up
Joe...
Or the truly generic Joe Blow.
"He's a good Joe," or "...good ol' Joe".
Not to mention Joe College, Joe Cool, Joe Lunchpail,
Who may be Joe Sixpack at another time, or even at the same time.

One of my college roommates was in ROTC and told me that one of the
officers referred to the typical enlisted man as "Joe Snuffy in the
ranks" or "Joe Tentpeg in the ranks".
Post by CDB
and Joe Fresh (TM).
A relative of Joe Boxer (TM).
--
Jerry Friedman
Horace LaBadie
2019-01-14 17:21:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by CDB
Post by John Varela
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Will Parsons
My jo(e)?
To-night, my wife wanted to watch a Christmasy-type movie, so
she settled on "White Christmas".  In one song in the movie,
Rosemary Clooney uses the term Joe/jo [d?ou] to refer
(apparently) to a sweetheart.  Now, to those of us who grew up
with the poems of Robert Burns, this use of "jo" is quite
familiar.  But in 1954 (when "White Christmas" was made), was
this usage familiar to Americans?  Or should this be an (unknown
to me) use of the proper name "Joe" in some sort of generic
sense?
Joe is generic.
He can be found in lots of songs.
e.g., One For My Baby (And One More for the Road.) So set 'em up
Joe...
Or the truly generic Joe Blow.
"He's a good Joe," or "...good ol' Joe".
Not to mention Joe College, Joe Cool, Joe Lunchpail,
Who may be Joe Sixpack at another time, or even at the same time.
One of my college roommates was in ROTC and told me that one of the
officers referred to the typical enlisted man as "Joe Snuffy in the
ranks" or "Joe Tentpeg in the ranks".
Post by CDB
and Joe Fresh (TM).
A relative of Joe Boxer (TM).
Joe Palooka.
RHDraney
2019-01-14 17:49:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by CDB
Post by John Varela
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Will Parsons
My jo(e)?
To-night, my wife wanted to watch a Christmasy-type movie, so
she settled on "White Christmas".  In one song in the movie,
Rosemary Clooney uses the term Joe/jo [d?ou] to refer
(apparently) to a sweetheart.  Now, to those of us who grew up
with the poems of Robert Burns, this use of "jo" is quite
familiar.  But in 1954 (when "White Christmas" was made), was
this usage familiar to Americans?  Or should this be an (unknown
to me) use of the proper name "Joe" in some sort of generic
sense?
Joe is generic.
He can be found in lots of songs.
e.g., One For My Baby (And One More for the Road.) So set 'em up
Joe...
Or the truly generic Joe Blow.
"He's a good Joe," or "...good ol' Joe".
Not to mention Joe College, Joe Cool, Joe Lunchpail,
Who may be Joe Sixpack at another time, or even at the same time.
One of my college roommates was in ROTC and told me that one of the
officers referred to the typical enlisted man as "Joe Snuffy in the
ranks" or "Joe Tentpeg in the ranks".
Post by CDB
and Joe Fresh (TM).
A relative of Joe Boxer (TM).
Joe Palooka.
And leave us not forget:


....r
Snidely
2019-01-15 10:28:50 UTC
Permalink
Just this Monday, Horace LaBadie explained that ...
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by CDB
Post by John Varela
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Will Parsons
My jo(e)?
To-night, my wife wanted to watch a Christmasy-type movie, so
she settled on "White Christmas".  In one song in the movie,
Rosemary Clooney uses the term Joe/jo [d?ou] to refer
(apparently) to a sweetheart.  Now, to those of us who grew up
with the poems of Robert Burns, this use of "jo" is quite
familiar.  But in 1954 (when "White Christmas" was made), was
this usage familiar to Americans?  Or should this be an (unknown
to me) use of the proper name "Joe" in some sort of generic
sense?
Joe is generic.
He can be found in lots of songs.
e.g., One For My Baby (And One More for the Road.) So set 'em up
Joe...
Or the truly generic Joe Blow.
"He's a good Joe," or "...good ol' Joe".
Not to mention Joe College, Joe Cool, Joe Lunchpail,
Who may be Joe Sixpack at another time, or even at the same time.
One of my college roommates was in ROTC and told me that one of the
officers referred to the typical enlisted man as "Joe Snuffy in the
ranks" or "Joe Tentpeg in the ranks".
Post by CDB
and Joe Fresh (TM).
A relative of Joe Boxer (TM).
Joe Palooka.
Joe is introduced here:



/dps
--
"This is all very fine, but let us not be carried away be excitement,
but ask calmly, how does this person feel about in in his cooler
moments next day, with six or seven thousand feet of snow and stuff on
top of him?"
_Roughing It_, Mark Twain.
Quinn C
2019-01-21 19:44:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by CDB
Post by John Varela
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Will Parsons
My jo(e)?
To-night, my wife wanted to watch a Christmasy-type movie, so
she settled on "White Christmas".  In one song in the movie,
Rosemary Clooney uses the term Joe/jo [d?ou] to refer
(apparently) to a sweetheart.  Now, to those of us who grew up
with the poems of Robert Burns, this use of "jo" is quite
familiar.  But in 1954 (when "White Christmas" was made), was
this usage familiar to Americans?  Or should this be an (unknown
to me) use of the proper name "Joe" in some sort of generic
sense?
Joe is generic.
He can be found in lots of songs.
e.g., One For My Baby (And One More for the Road.) So set 'em up
Joe...
Or the truly generic Joe Blow.
"He's a good Joe," or "...good ol' Joe".
Not to mention Joe College, Joe Cool, Joe Lunchpail,
Who may be Joe Sixpack at another time, or even at the same time.
One of my college roommates was in ROTC and told me that one of the
officers referred to the typical enlisted man as "Joe Snuffy in the
ranks" or "Joe Tentpeg in the ranks".
Post by CDB
and Joe Fresh (TM).
A relative of Joe Boxer (TM).
I was wondering whether there is an association with a type of man. If
it's a "Joe", I'd expect an "average Joe", not a rich or educated
person. It seems to me Joseph Billionaire might not be so eager to
shorten his name. Or is "Joe" so common that it straddles all
demographics?
--
...an explanatory principle - like "gravity" or "instinct" -
really explains nothing. It’s a sort of conventional agreement
between scientists to stop trying to explain things at a
certain point. -- Gregory Bateson
Peter T. Daniels
2019-01-21 21:16:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by Quinn C
I was wondering whether there is an association with a type of man. If
it's a "Joe", I'd expect an "average Joe", not a rich or educated
person. It seems to me Joseph Billionaire might not be so eager to
shorten his name. Or is "Joe" so common that it straddles all
demographics?
Joe Kennedy was so called when his large brood was mentioned. Joe Jr. was
the one who was supposed to be President, but he was lost in the War.
Bobby's son was, I think, known as Joseph III, but he fell from grace so we don't need to worry about him any more. (It's hard to keep track of all
the Kennedy congresscritters. The current John Kennedy (R-LA) is most
definitely not one of them.

Bart Dinnissen
2019-01-14 20:36:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by CDB
Post by John Varela
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Will Parsons
My jo(e)?
To-night, my wife wanted to watch a Christmasy-type movie, so
she settled on "White Christmas". In one song in the movie,
Rosemary Clooney uses the term Joe/jo [d?ou] to refer
(apparently) to a sweetheart. Now, to those of us who grew up
with the poems of Robert Burns, this use of "jo" is quite
familiar. But in 1954 (when "White Christmas" was made), was
this usage familiar to Americans? Or should this be an (unknown
to me) use of the proper name "Joe" in some sort of generic
sense?
Joe is generic.
He can be found in lots of songs.
e.g., One For My Baby (And One More for the Road.) So set 'em up
Joe...
Or the truly generic Joe Blow.
"He's a good Joe," or "...good ol' Joe".
Not to mention Joe College, Joe Cool, Joe Lunchpail, and Joe Fresh (TM).
Springsteen:

Some girls they want a handsome Dan
Or some good-lookin' Joe on their arm
Some girls like a sweet-talkin' Romeo
--
Bart Dinnissen
CDB
2019-01-15 08:50:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by CDB
Post by John Varela
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Will Parsons
My jo(e)?
To-night, my wife wanted to watch a Christmasy-type movie, so
she settled on "White Christmas". In one song in the movie,
Rosemary Clooney uses the term Joe/jo [d?ou] to refer
(apparently) to a sweetheart. Now, to those of us who grew
up with the poems of Robert Burns, this use of "jo" is quite
familiar. But in 1954 (when "White Christmas" was made),
was this usage familiar to Americans? Or should this be an
(unknown to me) use of the proper name "Joe" in some sort of
generic sense?
Joe is generic.
He can be found in lots of songs.
e.g., One For My Baby (And One More for the Road.) So set 'em
up Joe...
Or the truly generic Joe Blow.
"He's a good Joe," or "...good ol' Joe".
Not to mention Joe College, Joe Cool, Joe Lunchpail, and Joe Fresh (TM).
Some girls they want a handsome Dan Or some good-lookin' Joe on
their arm Some girls like a sweet-talkin' Romeo
Brief memory clip (Might be Bloody Mary waving and smiling to some
sailors): "Hello, Joe!" [later] Might be Gwen Verdon as Lola, come to
think, in which case "Joe" is just a name. Damn.

.
John Varela
2019-01-15 23:45:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by CDB
Post by CDB
Post by John Varela
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Will Parsons
My jo(e)?
To-night, my wife wanted to watch a Christmasy-type movie, so
she settled on "White Christmas". In one song in the movie,
Rosemary Clooney uses the term Joe/jo [d?ou] to refer
(apparently) to a sweetheart. Now, to those of us who grew
up with the porems of Robert Burns, this use of "jo" is quite
familiar. But in 1954 (when "White Christmas" was made),
was this usage familiar to Americans? Or should this be an
(unknown to me) use of the proper name "Joe" in some sort of
generic sense?
Joe is generic.
He can be found in lots of songs.
e.g., One For My Baby (And One More for the Road.) So set 'em
up Joe...
Or the truly generic Joe Blow.
"He's a good Joe," or "...good ol' Joe".
Not to mention Joe College, Joe Cool, Joe Lunchpail, and Joe Fresh (TM).
Some girls they want a handsome Dan Or some good-lookin' Joe on
their arm Some girls like a sweet-talkin' Romeo
Brief memory clip (Might be Bloody Mary waving and smiling to some
sailors): "Hello, Joe!" [later] Might be Gwen Verdon as Lola, come to
think, in which case "Joe" is just a name. Damn.
Or this, from Patty, Maxine, and Laverne*, among others:

Well hello Joe, what do you know
I just got back from a vaudeville show

The name of the song was "Well All Right".

* Those were The Andrews Sisters
--
John Varela
Tony Cooper
2019-01-16 01:01:37 UTC
Permalink
Post by John Varela
Post by CDB
Post by CDB
Post by John Varela
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Will Parsons
My jo(e)?
To-night, my wife wanted to watch a Christmasy-type movie, so
she settled on "White Christmas". In one song in the movie,
Rosemary Clooney uses the term Joe/jo [d?ou] to refer
(apparently) to a sweetheart. Now, to those of us who grew
up with the porems of Robert Burns, this use of "jo" is quite
familiar. But in 1954 (when "White Christmas" was made),
was this usage familiar to Americans? Or should this be an
(unknown to me) use of the proper name "Joe" in some sort of
generic sense?
Joe is generic.
He can be found in lots of songs.
e.g., One For My Baby (And One More for the Road.) So set 'em
up Joe...
Or the truly generic Joe Blow.
"He's a good Joe," or "...good ol' Joe".
Not to mention Joe College, Joe Cool, Joe Lunchpail, and Joe Fresh (TM).
Some girls they want a handsome Dan Or some good-lookin' Joe on
their arm Some girls like a sweet-talkin' Romeo
Brief memory clip (Might be Bloody Mary waving and smiling to some
sailors): "Hello, Joe!" [later] Might be Gwen Verdon as Lola, come to
think, in which case "Joe" is just a name. Damn.
Well hello Joe, what do you know
I just got back from a vaudeville show
The name of the song was "Well All Right".
* Those were The Andrews Sisters
Add "Set 'em up, Joe". It spent 15 weeks in the Top 40 in 1988.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Madrigal Gurneyhalt
2019-01-13 10:37:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by Will Parsons
My jo(e)?
To-night, my wife wanted to watch a Christmasy-type movie, so she
settled on "White Christmas". In one song in the movie, Rosemary
Clooney uses the term Joe/jo [dʒou] to refer (apparently) to a
sweetheart. Now, to those of us who grew up with the poems of Robert
Burns, this use of "jo" is quite familiar. But in 1954 (when "White
Christmas" was made), was this usage familiar to Americans? Or should
this be an (unknown to me) use of the proper name "Joe" in some sort
of generic sense?
Never noticed that John Doe is an expansion of Joe? He's just some guy,
you know.
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2019-01-13 11:49:49 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 13 Jan 2019 02:37:33 -0800 (PST), Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Will Parsons
My jo(e)?
To-night, my wife wanted to watch a Christmasy-type movie, so she
settled on "White Christmas". In one song in the movie, Rosemary
Clooney uses the term Joe/jo [d?ou] to refer (apparently) to a
sweetheart. Now, to those of us who grew up with the poems of Robert
Burns, this use of "jo" is quite familiar. But in 1954 (when "White
Christmas" was made), was this usage familiar to Americans? Or should
this be an (unknown to me) use of the proper name "Joe" in some sort
of generic sense?
Never noticed that John Doe is an expansion of Joe? He's just some guy,
you know.
That is not the origin of John Doe, as I suspect you noe.
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
RHDraney
2019-01-13 20:31:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Will Parsons
My jo(e)?
To-night, my wife wanted to watch a Christmasy-type movie, so she
settled on "White Christmas". In one song in the movie, Rosemary
Clooney uses the term Joe/jo [dʒou] to refer (apparently) to a
sweetheart. Now, to those of us who grew up with the poems of Robert
Burns, this use of "jo" is quite familiar. But in 1954 (when "White
Christmas" was made), was this usage familiar to Americans? Or should
this be an (unknown to me) use of the proper name "Joe" in some sort
of generic sense?
Never noticed that John Doe is an expansion of Joe? He's just some guy,
you know.
A Guy Named Joe?...that was Spencer Tracy....r
b***@aol.com
2019-01-13 23:21:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Will Parsons
My jo(e)?
To-night, my wife wanted to watch a Christmasy-type movie, so she
settled on "White Christmas". In one song in the movie, Rosemary
Clooney uses the term Joe/jo [dʒou] to refer (apparently) to a
sweetheart. Now, to those of us who grew up with the poems of Robert
Burns, this use of "jo" is quite familiar. But in 1954 (when "White
Christmas" was made), was this usage familiar to Americans? Or should
this be an (unknown to me) use of the proper name "Joe" in some sort
of generic sense?
Never noticed that John Doe is an expansion of Joe?
If so, it might have started as Joe Donn(e).
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
He's just some guy, you know.
Jerry Friedman
2019-01-13 14:51:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by Will Parsons
My jo(e)?
To-night, my wife wanted to watch a Christmasy-type movie, so she
settled on "White Christmas". In one song in the movie, Rosemary
Clooney uses the term Joe/jo [dʒou] to refer (apparently) to a
sweetheart. Now, to those of us who grew up with the poems of Robert
Burns, this use of "jo" is quite familiar. But in 1954 (when "White
Christmas" was made), was this usage familiar to Americans? Or should
this be an (unknown to me) use of the proper name "Joe" in some sort
of generic sense?
You're talking about this?

"My one love affair didn't get anywhere from the start.
To send me a Joe/jo who had winter and snow in his heart
Wasn't smart."

I'm going for "Joe" generically meaning "guy", as needed for the rhyme.

"When you see a Joe saving half of his dough,
You can bet there'll be mink in it for some doll."
--
Jerry Friedman
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