Discussion:
eyes right
(too old to reply)
Peter T. Daniels
2019-01-16 14:17:12 UTC
Permalink
What, exactly, would I google to find out what "Ayes on the right, NN; Noes
on the left, NN" means?

Do the MsP stand up and walk to one side of the room or the other? Is the
room big enough for 400 of them to be on one side and 200 on the other?
h***@gmail.com
2019-01-16 14:30:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
What, exactly, would I google to find out what "Ayes on the right, NN; Noes
on the left, NN" means?
Do the MsP stand up and walk to one side of the room or the other? Is the
room big enough for 400 of them to be on one side and 200 on the other?
"MsP" gets you the Scottish Parliament. Googling "how are mps votes
counted" gives you:

"MPs have eight minutes to arrive in one of the two lobbies before the
entrances are locked. They are counted as they exit. The quorum for a
vote is 40. The outcome of the vote is then reported to the chair by
one of the four MPs (two for each lobby) appointed to count the votes
(teller)".

<https://www.google.co.uk/search?ei=0T4_XNn6M8yW1fAP9fOsoA8&q=how+are+mps+votes+counted&oq=how+are+mps+votes+counted&gs_l=psy-ab.12..0i71l8.0.0..105147...0.0..0.0.0.......0......gws-wiz.lxdv9NO0Y9w>
Kerr-Mudd,John
2019-01-16 21:30:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by h***@gmail.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
What, exactly, would I google to find out what "Ayes on the right,
NN; Noes on the left, NN" means?
[]
Post by h***@gmail.com
"MsP" gets you the Scottish Parliament. Googling "how are mps votes
I suppose, given enough time, PTD will be awarded his Google proficency
badge.
--
Bah, and indeed, Humbug.
Peter T. Daniels
2019-01-17 06:20:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
Post by h***@gmail.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
What, exactly, would I google to find out what "Ayes on the right,
NN; Noes on the left, NN" means?
[]
Post by h***@gmail.com
"MsP" gets you the Scottish Parliament. Googling "how are mps votes
I suppose, given enough time, PTD will be awarded his Google proficency
badge.
--
Bah, and indeed, Humbug.
Time to fuck off again, Shithead scrooge.

Too cowardly even to address his contentless messages to me directly.
Horace LaBadie
2019-01-16 14:36:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
What, exactly, would I google to find out what "Ayes on the right, NN; Noes
on the left, NN" means?
Do the MsP stand up and walk to one side of the room or the other? Is the
room big enough for 400 of them to be on one side and 200 on the other?
It's called "division."

<https://www.parliament.uk/about/how/business/divisions/>

"Members of both Houses register their vote for or against issues by
physically going into two different areas either side of their debating
chambers. This is known as 'dividing the House', while the areas
concerned are 'division lobbies'. Therefore, a vote is called a
'division'. "
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2019-01-16 18:58:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Peter T. Daniels
What, exactly, would I google to find out what "Ayes on the right, NN; Noes
on the left, NN" means?
Do the MsP stand up and walk to one side of the room or the other? Is the
room big enough for 400 of them to be on one side and 200 on the other?
It's called "division."
<https://www.parliament.uk/about/how/business/divisions/>
"Members of both Houses register their vote for or against issues by
physically going into two different areas either side of their debating
chambers. This is known as 'dividing the House', while the areas
concerned are 'division lobbies'. Therefore, a vote is called a
'division'. "
I don't know whether the lobbies are large enough to hold all the MPs
voting. It isn't necessary.

More from that url:

During a division, Members literally divide into two separate areas.
These are called the Aye and No lobbies in the Commons...

As they pass through the lobbies, the Members have their names
recorded by clerks and are counted by tellers. Once the lobbies are
empty the Speaker (Commons)... announces the result of the division.
The whole process takes about fifteen minutes.

There are four tellers, two for each lobby. They are Members (MPs)
chosen for the task. After the count the tellers announce the count in
each lobby and the Speaker than makes the formal announcement of the
result.
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2019-01-17 15:54:43 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 16 Jan 2019 18:58:49 +0000, "Peter Duncanson [BrE]"
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Peter T. Daniels
What, exactly, would I google to find out what "Ayes on the right, NN; Noes
on the left, NN" means?
Do the MsP stand up and walk to one side of the room or the other? Is the
room big enough for 400 of them to be on one side and 200 on the other?
It's called "division."
<https://www.parliament.uk/about/how/business/divisions/>
"Members of both Houses register their vote for or against issues by
physically going into two different areas either side of their debating
chambers. This is known as 'dividing the House', while the areas
concerned are 'division lobbies'. Therefore, a vote is called a
'division'. "
I don't know whether the lobbies are large enough to hold all the MPs
voting. It isn't necessary.
During a division, Members literally divide into two separate areas.
These are called the Aye and No lobbies in the Commons...
As they pass through the lobbies, the Members have their names
recorded by clerks and are counted by tellers. Once the lobbies are
empty the Speaker (Commons)... announces the result of the division.
The whole process takes about fifteen minutes.
There are four tellers, two for each lobby. They are Members (MPs)
chosen for the task. After the count the tellers announce the count in
each lobby and the Speaker than makes the formal announcement of the
result.
That wording could be misunderstood.

"announce the count in each lobby" does not mean that the announcement
is made in the lobby. The tellers stand facing the Speaker in the
Commons chamber and one of them orally informs him/her of the voting
numbers from the lobbies.
This is something of an old ritual as the Speaker is given the numbers
in writing before then making his/her announcement of the numbers.
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Madrigal Gurneyhalt
2019-01-16 14:37:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
What, exactly, would I google to find out what "Ayes on the right, NN; Noes
on the left, NN" means?
Do the MsP stand up and walk to one side of the room or the other? Is the
room big enough for 400 of them to be on one side and 200 on the other?
The members walk through two lobbies to the sides of the chamber
to register their vote. The Ayes pass through the lobby to the right
of the Speaker, the Noes through the lobby on the left. It is not
necessary at any point for all the voters to occupy the lobbies
simultaneously. It's England. They form an orderly queue and return
to their seats when their vote has been recorded.
Peter T. Daniels
2019-01-16 15:08:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Peter T. Daniels
What, exactly, would I google to find out what "Ayes on the right, NN; Noes
on the left, NN" means?
Do the MsP stand up and walk to one side of the room or the other? Is the
room big enough for 400 of them to be on one side and 200 on the other?
The members walk through two lobbies to the sides of the chamber
to register their vote. The Ayes pass through the lobby to the right
of the Speaker, the Noes through the lobby on the left. It is not
necessary at any point for all the voters to occupy the lobbies
simultaneously. It's England. They form an orderly queue and return
to their seats when their vote has been recorded.
Wow. How long does it take for 600+ people, some of them presumably
elderly and doddering, some of them perhaps movement-impaired, to do that?

Do they do that for every vote?

Are individuals' votes recorded, so that constituents can know what
their representatives are up to?

Whereas the House of Representatives decades ago installed electric, and
now electronic, voting, whereby each of the 435 registers a vote at their
desk, and the totals are visible as they come in, and the names are known.

The Senate, with only 100 members, resorts to a roll-call vote, especially
when the Majority wishes to embarrass Minority members so as to have
something to use against them in the next election.
Madrigal Gurneyhalt
2019-01-16 15:35:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Peter T. Daniels
What, exactly, would I google to find out what "Ayes on the right, NN; Noes
on the left, NN" means?
Do the MsP stand up and walk to one side of the room or the other? Is the
room big enough for 400 of them to be on one side and 200 on the other?
The members walk through two lobbies to the sides of the chamber
to register their vote. The Ayes pass through the lobby to the right
of the Speaker, the Noes through the lobby on the left. It is not
necessary at any point for all the voters to occupy the lobbies
simultaneously. It's England. They form an orderly queue and return
to their seats when their vote has been recorded.
Wow. How long does it take for 600+ people, some of them presumably
elderly and doddering, some of them perhaps movement-impaired, to do that?
Eight minutes to get everybody through the lobby door at one end. Another
five or so to get them out the other. MPs tend not to be elderly or if they are
rarely doddering. And, of course, votes involving every member are few and
far between.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Do they do that for every vote?
No. Only for the most important or contentious votes.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Are individuals' votes recorded, so that constituents can know what
their representatives are up to?
Yes. All this morning's papers have a list of who voted what last night.
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2019-01-16 19:06:43 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 16 Jan 2019 07:35:31 -0800 (PST), Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Peter T. Daniels
What, exactly, would I google to find out what "Ayes on the right, NN; Noes
on the left, NN" means?
Do the MsP stand up and walk to one side of the room or the other? Is the
room big enough for 400 of them to be on one side and 200 on the other?
The members walk through two lobbies to the sides of the chamber
to register their vote. The Ayes pass through the lobby to the right
of the Speaker, the Noes through the lobby on the left. It is not
necessary at any point for all the voters to occupy the lobbies
simultaneously. It's England. They form an orderly queue and return
to their seats when their vote has been recorded.
Wow. How long does it take for 600+ people, some of them presumably
elderly and doddering, some of them perhaps movement-impaired, to do that?
Eight minutes to get everybody through the lobby door at one end. Another
five or so to get them out the other. MPs tend not to be elderly or if they are
rarely doddering. And, of course, votes involving every member are few and
far between.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Do they do that for every vote?
No. Only for the most important or contentious votes.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Are individuals' votes recorded, so that constituents can know what
their representatives are up to?
Yes. All this morning's papers have a list of who voted what last night.
And that information is available on the Parliament website.
<https://hansard.parliament.uk/Commons/2019-01-15/division/B975E889-89F5-42D3-9C18-7562AFD1977C/EuropeanUnion(Withdrawal)Act?outputType=Names>
or
http://tinyurl.com/y6wkfdoj
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
John Ritson
2019-01-16 22:52:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Peter T. Daniels
What, exactly, would I google to find out what "Ayes on the right, NN; Noes
on the left, NN" means?
Do the MsP stand up and walk to one side of the room or the other? Is the
room big enough for 400 of them to be on one side and 200 on the other?
The members walk through two lobbies to the sides of the chamber
to register their vote. The Ayes pass through the lobby to the right
of the Speaker, the Noes through the lobby on the left. It is not
necessary at any point for all the voters to occupy the lobbies
simultaneously. It's England. They form an orderly queue and return
to their seats when their vote has been recorded.
Wow. How long does it take for 600+ people, some of them presumably
elderly and doddering, some of them perhaps movement-impaired, to do that?
With all the other procedural rituals, it takes about 15 minutes.
In less crucial votes, MPs can be 'paired' so that people on either side
agree not to vote, but the overall majority stays the same.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Do they do that for every vote?
They tend to have a voice vote first, even on the key votes. If one side
is clearly very much larger, then the Speaker can declare the result
without anybody walking through the lobbies, although the losing side
could insist on a formal count.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Are individuals' votes recorded, so that constituents can know what
their representatives are up to?
Yes.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Whereas the House of Representatives decades ago installed electric, and
now electronic, voting, whereby each of the 435 registers a vote at their
desk, and the totals are visible as they come in, and the names are known.
The Scottish Parliament and Welsh Assembly use an electronic voting
system. (The Northern Irish Assembly also does, but the Assembly is
currently suspended)
Post by Peter T. Daniels
The Senate, with only 100 members, resorts to a roll-call vote, especially
when the Majority wishes to embarrass Minority members so as to have
something to use against them in the next election.
---
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
https://www.avg.com
--
John Ritson
CDB
2019-01-16 16:08:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
What, exactly, would I google to find out what "Ayes on the right,
NN; Noes on the left, NN" means?
"British Commons recorded votes" might give you a start.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Do the MsP stand up and walk to one side of the room or the other?
Is the room big enough for 400 of them to be on one side and 200 on
the other?
IIRC, they leave the Chamber and return through one door for YEA and the
other for NAY.

I see below that other accounts are somewhat different. I don`t insist
on mine: my information is at least a couple of decades out of date, and
not about something I needed to know.

I used the customary Canadian words above; our Members rise in their
places one by one when their preferred response is called for -- YEAS
first -- and sit again when their name is called.

I can watch the fun for hours. It reminds me of the old-lady
orchestra in _Allegro Non Troppo_ being punished by their fat bully of a
conductor: "Onn sé levvé, onn sé rassoitt".

As for the terminology you commented on in a separate post, surely that
is a matter for them to decide.
J. J. Lodder
2019-01-16 20:47:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
What, exactly, would I google to find out what "Ayes on the right, NN; Noes
on the left, NN" means?
Do the MsP stand up and walk to one side of the room or the other? Is the
room big enough for 400 of them to be on one side and 200 on the other?
Can't you see it happening live,
or at least look at a playback for once?

[quite off-topic] It made John Bercow a star,
and we know now that he has a no doubt very disciplined cat
named 'Order',

Jan
occam
2019-01-17 08:55:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
What, exactly, would I google to find out what "Ayes on the right, NN; Noes
on the left, NN" means?
Here is an answer, from British comedian Matt Forde:

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