Discussion:
No matter good the material...
(too old to reply)
Paul Carmichael
2019-11-30 11:16:27 UTC
Permalink
Just saw this sentence in a guitar tutorial:

"No matter good the material, we still have to learn it."

Is this accepted LP usage? If so, does it extend to other situations where there would
normally be a qualifier?
--
Paul.

https://paulc.es
Mark Brader
2019-11-30 12:01:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by Paul Carmichael
"No matter good the material, we still have to learn it."
Looks like a typo to me.
Post by Paul Carmichael
Is this accepted LP usage?
Long-playing, Lower Peninsula, lumbar puncture, ...
--
Mark Brader, Toronto "I may be ranting, but I'm right!"
***@vex.net -- Wojeck: Out of the Fire
Peter Moylan
2019-11-30 12:07:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mark Brader
Post by Paul Carmichael
"No matter good the material, we still have to learn it."
Looks like a typo to me.
More than a typo, I think. If we take the second part of the sentence
into account, the first part should be "No matter how bad the material".
Post by Mark Brader
Post by Paul Carmichael
Is this accepted LP usage?
Long-playing, Lower Peninsula, lumbar puncture, ...
To avoid confusion, I write 33 rather than LP.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Richard Heathfield
2019-11-30 12:10:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Mark Brader
Post by Paul Carmichael
"No matter good the material, we still have to learn it."
Looks like a typo to me.
More than a typo, I think. If we take the second part of the sentence
into account, the first part should be "No matter how bad the material".
Post by Mark Brader
Post by Paul Carmichael
Is this accepted LP usage?
Long-playing, Lower Peninsula, lumbar puncture, ...
To avoid confusion, I write 33 rather than LP.
Not to be confused with 33 (EP).
--
Richard Heathfield
Email: rjh at cpax dot org dot uk
"Usenet is a strange place" - dmr 29 July 1999
Sig line 4 vacant - apply within
Mark Brader
2019-11-30 12:16:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Mark Brader
Post by Paul Carmichael
"No matter good the material, we still have to learn it."
Looks like a typo to me.
More than a typo, I think. If we take the second part of the sentence
into account, the first part should be "No matter how bad the material".
I took the meaning to be "Yes, the material is very good: it explains
what we have to learn very well. But we still have to actually learn it."
--
Mark Brader "C was developed for the programmer
Toronto (two of them, in fact)"
***@vex.net -- Alasdair Grant
Paul Carmichael
2019-11-30 12:35:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mark Brader
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Mark Brader
Post by Paul Carmichael
"No matter good the material, we still have to learn it."
Looks like a typo to me.
More than a typo, I think. If we take the second part of the sentence
into account, the first part should be "No matter how bad the material".
I took the meaning to be "Yes, the material is very good: it explains
what we have to learn very well. But we still have to actually learn it."
I believe that is the intended meaning.
--
Paul.

https://paulc.es
Peter Moylan
2019-11-30 12:36:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mark Brader
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Mark Brader
Post by Paul Carmichael
"No matter good the material, we still have to learn it."
Looks like a typo to me.
More than a typo, I think. If we take the second part of the
sentence into account, the first part should be "No matter how bad
the material".
I took the meaning to be "Yes, the material is very good: it
explains what we have to learn very well. But we still have to
actually learn it."
OK, I can see how that would make sense in the right context. I probably
shouldn't have made a judgement without first seeing the context.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
b***@shaw.ca
2019-11-30 20:05:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Mark Brader
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Mark Brader
Post by Paul Carmichael
"No matter good the material, we still have to learn it."
Looks like a typo to me.
More than a typo, I think. If we take the second part of the
sentence into account, the first part should be "No matter how bad
the material".
I took the meaning to be "Yes, the material is very good: it
explains what we have to learn very well. But we still have to
actually learn it."
OK, I can see how that would make sense in the right context. I probably
shouldn't have made a judgement without first seeing the context.
The context remains unknown and as long as it remains so,
your supposition is as valid as the several dissenting suppositions.

bill
Ken Blake
2019-11-30 15:54:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Mark Brader
Post by Paul Carmichael
"No matter good the material, we still have to learn it."
Looks like a typo to me.
More than a typo, I think. If we take the second part of the sentence
into account, the first part should be "No matter how bad the material".
Yes, but omitting a word is a kind of typo, at least to me. It's an
error I often make while typing, but never while writing.
--
Ken
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2019-11-30 16:16:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Mark Brader
Post by Paul Carmichael
"No matter good the material, we still have to learn it."
Looks like a typo to me.
More than a typo, I think. If we take the second part of the sentence
into account, the first part should be "No matter how bad the material".
Yes, but omitting a word is a kind of typo, at least to me. It's an
error I often make while typing, but never while writing.
All the time, nowadays. Mostly it doesn't matter, but I quite often omit "not".
--
athel
b***@shaw.ca
2019-11-30 20:09:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Mark Brader
Post by Paul Carmichael
"No matter good the material, we still have to learn it."
Looks like a typo to me.
More than a typo, I think. If we take the second part of the sentence
into account, the first part should be "No matter how bad the material".
Yes, but omitting a word is a kind of typo, at least to me. It's an
error I often make while typing, but never while writing.
We have a better word for that, relatively new to me: "thinko".

"Typo" is short for typographical error, and in practice it means
your fat fingers hit one or more letters you didn't intend. That's
not the case when you omit a word, even though you were thinking it
as you typed. I do that all the time.

bill
Quinn C
2019-11-30 22:18:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by b***@shaw.ca
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Mark Brader
Post by Paul Carmichael
"No matter good the material, we still have to learn it."
Looks like a typo to me.
More than a typo, I think. If we take the second part of the sentence
into account, the first part should be "No matter how bad the material".
Yes, but omitting a word is a kind of typo, at least to me. It's an
error I often make while typing, but never while writing.
We have a better word for that, relatively new to me: "thinko".
"Typo" is short for typographical error, and in practice it means
your fat fingers hit one or more letters you didn't intend. That's
not the case when you omit a word, even though you were thinking it
as you typed. I do that all the time.
I don't think a clear line can be drawn. Many of my typos are such that
the parts of the brain that control the fingers send the wrong signals,
and I end up typing some common letter combination that's not the one
that the higher brain wanted. I think those are pretty close to the
omission of words ones.
--
Quinn C
My pronouns are they/them
(or other gender-neutral ones)
b***@shaw.ca
2019-11-30 22:47:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by Quinn C
Post by b***@shaw.ca
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Mark Brader
Post by Paul Carmichael
"No matter good the material, we still have to learn it."
Looks like a typo to me.
More than a typo, I think. If we take the second part of the sentence
into account, the first part should be "No matter how bad the material".
Yes, but omitting a word is a kind of typo, at least to me. It's an
error I often make while typing, but never while writing.
We have a better word for that, relatively new to me: "thinko".
"Typo" is short for typographical error, and in practice it means
your fat fingers hit one or more letters you didn't intend. That's
not the case when you omit a word, even though you were thinking it
as you typed. I do that all the time.
I don't think a clear line can be drawn. Many of my typos are such that
the parts of the brain that control the fingers send the wrong signals,
and I end up typing some common letter combination that's not the one
that the higher brain wanted. I think those are pretty close to the
omission of words ones.
I can live with that. Nothing's written in stone, except for
an occasional gravestone typo.

bill
John Varela
2019-12-01 02:45:40 UTC
Permalink
On Sat, 30 Nov 2019 22:18:56 UTC, Quinn C
Post by Quinn C
Post by b***@shaw.ca
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Mark Brader
Post by Paul Carmichael
"No matter good the material, we still have to learn it."
Looks like a typo to me.
More than a typo, I think. If we take the second part of the sentence
into account, the first part should be "No matter how bad the material".
Yes, but omitting a word is a kind of typo, at least to me. It's an
error I often make while typing, but never while writing.
We have a better word for that, relatively new to me: "thinko".
"Typo" is short for typographical error, and in practice it means
your fat fingers hit one or more letters you didn't intend. That's
not the case when you omit a word, even though you were thinking it
as you typed. I do that all the time.
I don't think a clear line can be drawn. Many of my typos are such that
the parts of the brain that control the fingers send the wrong signals,
and I end up typing some common letter combination that's not the one
that the higher brain wanted. I think those are pretty close to the
omission of words ones.
That happens to me, too. I'll be typing a word that ends in -ion
and it will come out -ing.
--
John Varela
Jerry Friedman
2019-12-01 03:44:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by b***@shaw.ca
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Mark Brader
Post by Paul Carmichael
"No matter good the material, we still have to learn it."
Looks like a typo to me.
More than a typo, I think. If we take the second part of the sentence
into account, the first part should be "No matter how bad the material".
Yes, but omitting a word is a kind of typo, at least to me. It's an
error I often make while typing, but never while writing.
We have a better word for that, relatively new to me: "thinko".
"Typo" is short for typographical error, and in practice it means
your fat fingers hit one or more letters you didn't intend. That's
not the case when you omit a word, even though you were thinking it
as you typed. I do that all the time.
When I think of a thinko, I mean thinking of the wrong thing--a
malapropism, for example. If I omit a word, as I do, I was thinking of
it, so that's not a thinko--more like a typo.
--
Jerry Friedman
Tony Cooper
2019-12-01 06:14:21 UTC
Permalink
On Sat, 30 Nov 2019 20:44:44 -0700, Jerry Friedman
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by b***@shaw.ca
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Mark Brader
Post by Paul Carmichael
"No matter good the material, we still have to learn it."
Looks like a typo to me.
More than a typo, I think. If we take the second part of the sentence
into account, the first part should be "No matter how bad the material".
Yes, but omitting a word is a kind of typo, at least to me. It's an
error I often make while typing, but never while writing.
We have a better word for that, relatively new to me: "thinko".
"Typo" is short for typographical error, and in practice it means
your fat fingers hit one or more letters you didn't intend. That's
not the case when you omit a word, even though you were thinking it
as you typed. I do that all the time.
When I think of a thinko, I mean thinking of the wrong thing--a
malapropism, for example. If I omit a word, as I do, I was thinking of
it, so that's not a thinko--more like a typo.
You just did, you know. In your post earlier you wrote "I went to
Chicago the City of New Orleans..." leaving the "on" at home.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2019-12-01 08:31:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tony Cooper
On Sat, 30 Nov 2019 20:44:44 -0700, Jerry Friedman
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by b***@shaw.ca
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Mark Brader
Post by Paul Carmichael
"No matter good the material, we still have to learn it."
Looks like a typo to me.
More than a typo, I think. If we take the second part of the sentence
into account, the first part should be "No matter how bad the material".
Yes, but omitting a word is a kind of typo, at least to me. It's an
error I often make while typing, but never while writing.
We have a better word for that, relatively new to me: "thinko".
"Typo" is short for typographical error, and in practice it means
your fat fingers hit one or more letters you didn't intend. That's
not the case when you omit a word, even though you were thinking it
as you typed. I do that all the time.
When I think of a thinko, I mean thinking of the wrong thing--a
malapropism, for example. If I omit a word, as I do, I was thinking of
it, so that's not a thinko--more like a typo.
You just did, you know. In your post earlier you wrote "I went to
Chicago the City of New Orleans..." leaving the "on" at home.
Thanks. I couldn't figure out what he meant.
--
athel
Peter Moylan
2019-12-01 10:01:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Tony Cooper
On Sat, 30 Nov 2019 20:44:44 -0700, Jerry Friedman
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by b***@shaw.ca
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Mark Brader
Post by Paul Carmichael
"No matter good the material, we still have to learn
it."
Looks like a typo to me.
More than a typo, I think. If we take the second part of
the sentence into account, the first part should be "No
matter how bad the material".
Yes, but omitting a word is a kind of typo, at least to me.
It's an error I often make while typing, but never while
writing.
"thinko".
"Typo" is short for typographical error, and in practice it
means your fat fingers hit one or more letters you didn't
intend. That's not the case when you omit a word, even though
you were thinking it as you typed. I do that all the time.
When I think of a thinko, I mean thinking of the wrong thing--a
malapropism, for example. If I omit a word, as I do, I was
thinking of it, so that's not a thinko--more like a typo.
You just did, you know. In your post earlier you wrote "I went to
Chicago the City of New Orleans..." leaving the "on" at home.
Thanks. I couldn't figure out what he meant.
I had the same problem. I couldn't think of any song about Chicago the
City of New Orleans, so I just let it pass by.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Lewis
2019-12-01 07:09:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by b***@shaw.ca
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Mark Brader
Post by Paul Carmichael
"No matter good the material, we still have to learn it."
Looks like a typo to me.
More than a typo, I think. If we take the second part of the sentence
into account, the first part should be "No matter how bad the material".
Yes, but omitting a word is a kind of typo, at least to me. It's an
error I often make while typing, but never while writing.
We have a better word for that, relatively new to me: "thinko".
"Typo" is short for typographical error, and in practice it means
your fat fingers hit one or more letters you didn't intend. That's
not the case when you omit a word, even though you were thinking it
as you typed. I do that all the time.
When I think of a thinko, I mean thinking of the wrong thing--a
malapropism, for example. If I omit a word, as I do, I was thinking of
it, so that's not a thinko--more like a typo.
And a thinko can be spoken too, but if it is an error in what you typed,
including leaving out words, adding words, or traveling letters, it's a
tyop.
--
Critics look at actresses one of two ways: you're either bankable or
boinkable.
CDB
2019-12-01 13:38:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lewis
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by b***@shaw.ca
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Mark Brader
Post by Paul Carmichael
"No matter good the material, we still have to learn
it."
Looks like a typo to me.
More than a typo, I think. If we take the second part of the
sentence into account, the first part should be "No matter
how bad the material".
Yes, but omitting a word is a kind of typo, at least to me.
It's an error I often make while typing, but never while
writing.
We have a better word for that, relatively new to me: "thinko".
"Typo" is short for typographical error, and in practice it
means your fat fingers hit one or more letters you didn't intend.
That's not the case when you omit a word, even though you were
thinking it as you typed. I do that all the time.
When I think of a thinko, I mean thinking of the wrong thing--a
malapropism, for example. If I omit a word, as I do, I was
thinking of it, so that's not a thinko--more like a typo.
And a thinko can be spoken too, but if it is an error in what you
typed, including leaving out words, adding words, or traveling
letters, it's a tyop.
Nicely toyped.
Ken Blake
2019-12-01 19:12:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lewis
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by b***@shaw.ca
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Mark Brader
Post by Paul Carmichael
"No matter good the material, we still have to learn it."
Looks like a typo to me.
More than a typo, I think. If we take the second part of the sentence
into account, the first part should be "No matter how bad the material".
Yes, but omitting a word is a kind of typo, at least to me. It's an
error I often make while typing, but never while writing.
We have a better word for that, relatively new to me: "thinko".
"Typo" is short for typographical error, and in practice it means
your fat fingers hit one or more letters you didn't intend. That's
not the case when you omit a word, even though you were thinking it
as you typed. I do that all the time.
When I think of a thinko, I mean thinking of the wrong thing--a
malapropism, for example. If I omit a word, as I do, I was thinking of
it, so that's not a thinko--more like a typo.
And a thinko can be spoken too, but if it is an error in what you typed,
including leaving out words, adding words, or traveling letters, it's a
tyop.
"Tyop" is a kind of typo I often make, although I can't remember ever
making that one. The most common such error to me is "teh" for "the." Is
that what you mean by "traveling letters"?

Two other kinds of typos I often make is doubling the wrong letter in a
word (for example, my wife's name coming out "Eillen") and holding down
the shift key too long, so a word like "The" comes out "THe."
--
Ken
Ken Blake
2019-12-01 19:31:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Lewis
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by b***@shaw.ca
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Mark Brader
Post by Paul Carmichael
"No matter good the material, we still have to learn it."
Looks like a typo to me.
More than a typo, I think. If we take the second part of the sentence
into account, the first part should be "No matter how bad the material".
Yes, but omitting a word is a kind of typo, at least to me. It's an
error I often make while typing, but never while writing.
We have a better word for that, relatively new to me: "thinko".
"Typo" is short for typographical error, and in practice it means
your fat fingers hit one or more letters you didn't intend. That's
not the case when you omit a word, even though you were thinking it
as you typed. I do that all the time.
When I think of a thinko, I mean thinking of the wrong thing--a
malapropism, for example. If I omit a word, as I do, I was thinking of
it, so that's not a thinko--more like a typo.
And a thinko can be spoken too, but if it is an error in what you typed,
including leaving out words, adding words, or traveling letters, it's a
tyop.
"Tyop" is a kind of typo I often make, although I can't remember ever
making that one. The most common such error to me is "teh" for "the." Is
that what you mean by "traveling letters"?
Two other kinds of typos I often make is
are, are, are! not "is"!

Why is so much easier to catch such errors when I read my own message
after it arrives than when I proofread it before sending?
Post by Ken Blake
doubling the wrong letter in a
word (for example, my wife's name coming out "Eillen") and holding down
the shift key too long, so a word like "The" comes out "THe."
--
Ken
b***@aol.com
2019-12-01 19:49:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Lewis
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by b***@shaw.ca
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Mark Brader
Post by Paul Carmichael
"No matter good the material, we still have to learn it."
Looks like a typo to me.
More than a typo, I think. If we take the second part of the sentence
into account, the first part should be "No matter how bad the material".
Yes, but omitting a word is a kind of typo, at least to me. It's an
error I often make while typing, but never while writing.
We have a better word for that, relatively new to me: "thinko".
"Typo" is short for typographical error, and in practice it means
your fat fingers hit one or more letters you didn't intend. That's
not the case when you omit a word, even though you were thinking it
as you typed. I do that all the time.
When I think of a thinko, I mean thinking of the wrong thing--a
malapropism, for example. If I omit a word, as I do, I was thinking of
it, so that's not a thinko--more like a typo.
And a thinko can be spoken too, but if it is an error in what you typed,
including leaving out words, adding words, or traveling letters, it's a
tyop.
"Tyop" is a kind of typo I often make, although I can't remember ever
making that one. The most common such error to me is "teh" for "the." Is
that what you mean by "traveling letters"?
Ironically, the very word "metatehsis" illustrates this.
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Ken Blake
Two other kinds of typos I often make is
are, are, are! not "is"!
Why is so much easier to catch such errors when I read my own message
after it arrives than when I proofread it before sending?
Post by Ken Blake
doubling the wrong letter in a
word (for example, my wife's name coming out "Eillen") and holding down
the shift key too long, so a word like "The" comes out "THe."
--
Ken
Peter T. Daniels
2019-12-01 20:42:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by b***@aol.com
Ironically, the very word "metatehsis" illustrates this.
Linguists usually write "methatesis," which is phonotactically legitimate.
b***@aol.com
2019-12-01 20:59:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@aol.com
Ironically, the very word "metatehsis" illustrates this.
Linguists usually write "methatesis," which is phonotactically legitimate.
But that spelling reminds one of "methane" and could more likely conjure up
the second definition of "metathesis" given by M-W:

b: a chemical reaction in which different kinds of molecules exchange parts
to form other kinds of molecules
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2019-12-02 08:56:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@aol.com
Ironically, the very word "metatehsis" illustrates this.
Linguists usually write "methatesis," which is phonotactically legitimate.
But that spelling reminds one of "methane" and could more likely conjure up
b: a chemical reaction in which different kinds of molecules exchange parts
to form other kinds of molecules
In a lifetime of studying chemistry I've never met that word in a
chemical context (PubMed lists 5943 papers that use it, so apparently
it does have a life). It's hardly needed anyway, as most reactions
involving more than one molecule (that's to say most reactions) do that.
--
athel
Lewis
2019-12-01 22:04:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Lewis
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by b***@shaw.ca
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Mark Brader
Post by Paul Carmichael
"No matter good the material, we still have to learn it."
Looks like a typo to me.
More than a typo, I think. If we take the second part of the sentence
into account, the first part should be "No matter how bad the material".
Yes, but omitting a word is a kind of typo, at least to me. It's an
error I often make while typing, but never while writing.
We have a better word for that, relatively new to me: "thinko".
"Typo" is short for typographical error, and in practice it means
your fat fingers hit one or more letters you didn't intend. That's
not the case when you omit a word, even though you were thinking it
as you typed. I do that all the time.
When I think of a thinko, I mean thinking of the wrong thing--a
malapropism, for example. If I omit a word, as I do, I was thinking of
it, so that's not a thinko--more like a typo.
And a thinko can be spoken too, but if it is an error in what you typed,
including leaving out words, adding words, or traveling letters, it's a
tyop.
"Tyop" is a kind of typo I often make, although I can't remember ever
making that one. The most common such error to me is "teh" for "the." Is
that what you mean by "traveling letters"?
Travelling letters nomarly travel further than just transposition.

I actually have a text expansion that changes "typo" to "tyop", though
it does not apply in my command-line environment where I run my news
reader.
Post by Ken Blake
Two other kinds of typos I often make is doubling the wrong letter in a
word (for example, my wife's name coming out "Eillen") and holding down
the shift key too long, so a word like "The" comes out "THe."
And for an is a frequent one, and I nearly always miss it when scanning
for errors. Also 'to the' instead of 'to the'.
--
I think it would be fun to run a newspaper.
Ken Blake
2019-12-02 00:03:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lewis
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Lewis
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by b***@shaw.ca
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Mark Brader
Post by Paul Carmichael
"No matter good the material, we still have to learn it."
Looks like a typo to me.
More than a typo, I think. If we take the second part of the sentence
into account, the first part should be "No matter how bad the material".
Yes, but omitting a word is a kind of typo, at least to me. It's an
error I often make while typing, but never while writing.
We have a better word for that, relatively new to me: "thinko".
"Typo" is short for typographical error, and in practice it means
your fat fingers hit one or more letters you didn't intend. That's
not the case when you omit a word, even though you were thinking it
as you typed. I do that all the time.
When I think of a thinko, I mean thinking of the wrong thing--a
malapropism, for example. If I omit a word, as I do, I was thinking of
it, so that's not a thinko--more like a typo.
And a thinko can be spoken too, but if it is an error in what you typed,
including leaving out words, adding words, or traveling letters, it's a
tyop.
"Tyop" is a kind of typo I often make, although I can't remember ever
making that one. The most common such error to me is "teh" for "the." Is
that what you mean by "traveling letters"?
Travelling letters nomarly travel further than just transposition.
I actually have a text expansion that changes "typo" to "tyop", though
it does not apply in my command-line environment where I run my news
reader.
Did you write that backwards? "Typo" to "tyop" or "tyop" to "typo."

I use Autohotkey for several different things, one of which is to
correct many of the errors I make. It changes "Eillen" to "Eileen, "teh"
to "the," etc., but not "tyop" to "typo" since that's not a common error
for me.
Post by Lewis
Post by Ken Blake
Two other kinds of typos I often make is doubling the wrong letter in a
word (for example, my wife's name coming out "Eillen") and holding down
the shift key too long, so a word like "The" comes out "THe."
And for an is a frequent one, and I nearly always miss it when scanning
for errors. Also 'to the' instead of 'to the'.
--
Ken
Lewis
2019-12-02 09:14:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Lewis
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Lewis
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by b***@shaw.ca
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Mark Brader
Post by Paul Carmichael
"No matter good the material, we still have to learn it."
Looks like a typo to me.
More than a typo, I think. If we take the second part of the sentence
into account, the first part should be "No matter how bad the material".
Yes, but omitting a word is a kind of typo, at least to me. It's an
error I often make while typing, but never while writing.
We have a better word for that, relatively new to me: "thinko".
"Typo" is short for typographical error, and in practice it means
your fat fingers hit one or more letters you didn't intend. That's
not the case when you omit a word, even though you were thinking it
as you typed. I do that all the time.
When I think of a thinko, I mean thinking of the wrong thing--a
malapropism, for example. If I omit a word, as I do, I was thinking of
it, so that's not a thinko--more like a typo.
And a thinko can be spoken too, but if it is an error in what you typed,
including leaving out words, adding words, or traveling letters, it's a
tyop.
"Tyop" is a kind of typo I often make, although I can't remember ever
making that one. The most common such error to me is "teh" for "the." Is
that what you mean by "traveling letters"?
Travelling letters nomarly travel further than just transposition.
I actually have a text expansion that changes "typo" to "tyop", though
it does not apply in my command-line environment where I run my news
reader.
Did you write that backwards? "Typo" to "tyop" or "tyop" to "typo."
<checks>

No, I wrote it correctly. "Typo" is a word that should be a typo, so
"tyop"
--
and I lift my glass to the Awful Truth / which you can't reveal to
the Ears of Youth / except to say it isn't worth a dime
J. J. Lodder
2019-12-02 11:15:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lewis
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Lewis
I actually have a text expansion that changes "typo" to "tyop", though
it does not apply in my command-line environment where I run my news
reader.
Did you write that backwards? "Typo" to "tyop" or "tyop" to "typo."
<checks>
No, I wrote it correctly. "Typo" is a word that should be a typo, so
"tyop"
You mean a typing errro?

Jan
Kerr-Mudd,John
2019-12-03 10:17:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by Lewis
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Lewis
I actually have a text expansion that changes "typo" to "tyop",
though it does not apply in my command-line environment where I
run my news reader.
Did you write that backwards? "Typo" to "tyop" or "tyop" to "typo."
<checks>
No, I wrote it correctly. "Typo" is a word that should be a typo, so
"tyop"
You mean a typing errro?
Pshurely that's a trapsnositional error? (For added comic effect I aslo
swapped the two 'r's,'f's and 'd's).
Post by J. J. Lodder
Jan
--
Bah, and indeed, Humbug.
Quinn C
2019-12-02 22:49:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lewis
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Lewis
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Lewis
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by b***@shaw.ca
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Mark Brader
Post by Paul Carmichael
"No matter good the material, we still have to learn it."
Looks like a typo to me.
More than a typo, I think. If we take the second part of the sentence
into account, the first part should be "No matter how bad the material".
Yes, but omitting a word is a kind of typo, at least to me. It's an
error I often make while typing, but never while writing.
We have a better word for that, relatively new to me: "thinko".
"Typo" is short for typographical error, and in practice it means
your fat fingers hit one or more letters you didn't intend. That's
not the case when you omit a word, even though you were thinking it
as you typed. I do that all the time.
When I think of a thinko, I mean thinking of the wrong thing--a
malapropism, for example. If I omit a word, as I do, I was thinking of
it, so that's not a thinko--more like a typo.
And a thinko can be spoken too, but if it is an error in what you typed,
including leaving out words, adding words, or traveling letters, it's a
tyop.
"Tyop" is a kind of typo I often make, although I can't remember ever
making that one. The most common such error to me is "teh" for "the." Is
that what you mean by "traveling letters"?
Travelling letters nomarly travel further than just transposition.
I actually have a text expansion that changes "typo" to "tyop", though
it does not apply in my command-line environment where I run my news
reader.
Did you write that backwards? "Typo" to "tyop" or "tyop" to "typo."
<checks>
No, I wrote it correctly. "Typo" is a word that should be a typo, so
"tyop"
It's a common practice on German Usenet to deliberately misspell the
word "Fehler", meaning error, mistake.
--
Quinn C
My pronouns are they/them
(or other gender-neutral ones)
Paul Carmichael
2019-12-03 10:39:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by Quinn C
It's a common practice on German Usenet to deliberately misspell the
word "Fehler", meaning error, mistake.
Wow. Germany has its own usenet. Must go and take a look at that.
--
Paul.

https://paulc.es
Lewis
2019-12-03 12:03:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by Paul Carmichael
Post by Quinn C
It's a common practice on German Usenet to deliberately misspell the
word "Fehler", meaning error, mistake.
Wow. Germany has its own usenet. Must go and take a look at that.
There are a lot of .de groups for German language posting. It's
perfect;y understandable to refer to this is "German Usenet"
--
HILLBILLIES ARE PEOPLE TOO Bart chalkboard Ep. AABF11
J. J. Lodder
2019-12-03 13:34:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by Paul Carmichael
Post by Quinn C
It's a common practice on German Usenet to deliberately misspell the
word "Fehler", meaning error, mistake.
Wow. Germany has its own usenet. Must go and take a look at that.
And its own humour too!

Jan

Sam Plusnet
2019-12-01 19:13:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lewis
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by b***@shaw.ca
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Mark Brader
Post by Paul Carmichael
"No matter good the material, we still have to learn it."
Looks like a typo to me.
More than a typo, I think. If we take the second part of the sentence
into account, the first part should be "No matter how bad the material".
Yes, but omitting a word is a kind of typo, at least to me. It's an
error I often make while typing, but never while writing.
We have a better word for that, relatively new to me: "thinko".
"Typo" is short for typographical error, and in practice it means
your fat fingers hit one or more letters you didn't intend. That's
not the case when you omit a word, even though you were thinking it
as you typed. I do that all the time.
When I think of a thinko, I mean thinking of the wrong thing--a
malapropism, for example. If I omit a word, as I do, I was thinking of
it, so that's not a thinko--more like a typo.
And a thinko can be spoken too, but if it is an error in what you typed,
including leaving out words, adding words, or traveling letters, it's a
tyop.
Then there's the "Cut & Paste-o" where changes have been made, but not
quite ironed out.
--
Sam Plusnet
Richard Heathfield
2019-12-01 19:41:10 UTC
Permalink
<snip>
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Lewis
Post by Jerry Friedman
When I think of a thinko, I mean thinking of the wrong thing--a
malapropism, for example.  If I omit a word, as I do, I was thinking of
it, so that's not a thinko--more like a typo.
And a thinko can be spoken too, but if it is an error in what you typed,
including leaving out words, adding words, or traveling letters, it's a
tyop.
Then there's the "Cut & Paste-o" where changes have been made, but not
quite ironed out.
for(i = 0; i < x; i++)
{
for(j = 0; j < y; i++)
{
puts("Huh?");
}
}
--
Richard Heathfield
Email: rjh at cpax dot org dot uk
"Usenet is a strange place" - dmr 29 July 1999
Sig line 4 vacant - apply within
Anders D. Nygaard
2019-12-02 16:34:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by Richard Heathfield
<snip>
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Lewis
Post by Jerry Friedman
When I think of a thinko, I mean thinking of the wrong thing--a
malapropism, for example.  If I omit a word, as I do, I was thinking of
it, so that's not a thinko--more like a typo.
And a thinko can be spoken too, but if it is an error in what you typed,
including leaving out words, adding words, or traveling letters, it's a
tyop.
Then there's the "Cut & Paste-o" where changes have been made, but not
quite ironed out.
for(i = 0; i < x; i++)
{
  for(j = 0; j < y; i++)
  {
    puts("Huh?");
  }
}
Review comment: Did you really intend an infinite loop here?

/Anders, Denmark
Richard Heathfield
2019-12-02 16:39:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by Anders D. Nygaard
Post by Richard Heathfield
<snip>
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Lewis
Post by Jerry Friedman
When I think of a thinko, I mean thinking of the wrong thing--a
malapropism, for example.  If I omit a word, as I do, I was thinking of
it, so that's not a thinko--more like a typo.
And a thinko can be spoken too, but if it is an error in what you typed,
including leaving out words, adding words, or traveling letters, it's a
tyop.
Then there's the "Cut & Paste-o" where changes have been made, but
not quite ironed out.
for(i = 0; i < x; i++)
{
   for(j = 0; j < y; i++)
   {
     puts("Huh?");
   }
}
Review comment: Did you really intend an infinite loop here?
It was intended as an example of a "cut & paste-o".
--
Richard Heathfield
Email: rjh at cpax dot org dot uk
"Usenet is a strange place" - dmr 29 July 1999
Sig line 4 vacant - apply within
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2019-12-02 16:53:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by Richard Heathfield
Post by Anders D. Nygaard
Post by Richard Heathfield
<snip>
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Lewis
Post by Jerry Friedman
When I think of a thinko, I mean thinking of the wrong thing--a
malapropism, for example.  If I omit a word, as I do, I was thinking of
it, so that's not a thinko--more like a typo.
And a thinko can be spoken too, but if it is an error in what you typed,
including leaving out words, adding words, or traveling letters, it's a
tyop.
Then there's the "Cut & Paste-o" where changes have been made, but not
quite ironed out.
for(i = 0; i < x; i++)
{
   for(j = 0; j < y; i++)
   {
     puts("Huh?");
   }
}
Review comment: Did you really intend an infinite loop here?
It was intended as an example of a "cut & paste-o".
Yes, but it appears to be in C, the original write-only language, not
intended to be understood by yuman beans.
--
athel
Richard Heathfield
2019-12-02 17:09:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Richard Heathfield
Post by Anders D. Nygaard
Post by Richard Heathfield
<snip>
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Lewis
Post by Jerry Friedman
When I think of a thinko, I mean thinking of the wrong thing--a
malapropism, for example.  If I omit a word, as I do, I was thinking of
it, so that's not a thinko--more like a typo.
And a thinko can be spoken too, but if it is an error in what you typed,
including leaving out words, adding words, or traveling letters, it's a
tyop.
Then there's the "Cut & Paste-o" where changes have been made, but
not quite ironed out.
for(i = 0; i < x; i++)
{
   for(j = 0; j < y; i++)
   {
     puts("Huh?");
   }
}
Review comment: Did you really intend an infinite loop here?
It was intended as an example of a "cut & paste-o".
Yes, but it appears to be in C, the original write-only language, not
intended to be understood by yuman beans.
It is indeed in C, which can't hold a candle to Perl when it comes to
incomprehensibility - and Perl is way behind Brainf**k, which - believe
it or not - is a very poor third to two very beautiful languages.

One of them is called Whitespace, which recognises only space, tab, and
newline as meaningful. If there is any actual text in there, it's
regarded as a comment!

The other, Piet, regards only colour as significant (and Piet programs
look remarkably like Piet Mondrian paintings).

But if you'd like to see an example of some reasonably unreadable C, I'm
glad to oblige with a program wot I did wrote myself a few years ago
(best viewed in fixed-pitch font with original formatting):

#include <stdio.h>

#define ob (
#define fu {
#define sc [
#define at =
#define ed ,
#define of -=
#define bu int
#define st char
#define ca long
#define de sizeof
#define od putchar
#define be 223358231
#define ft 942800930
#define ua 637602332
#define db 353174034
#define ef 709379359
#define tu 1275678223
#define as 1426395964
#define cc 1295460160
#define ci "Some"
#define rc " C pr"
#define um "ograms ar"
#define lo "e easy to read. Others are not. I like cryptic ones best"
#define cu ". How abo"
#define ti "ut yo"
#define on "u?\n"
#define cb 1414996287
#define fo 1129261318
#define ub 1026314584
#define sf 892273737
#define tc 506856216
#define ea 604783114
#define dt 876481060
#define ot 877025626
#define ba unsigned
#define fc 2781879
#define us return
#define su main
#define cf void
#define ds for
#define ec >>
#define tt /
#define sa %
#define uu ]
#define ae }
#define ue )


#define af ;
#define ab *
#define ac <
#define fs 0
#define cs >
#define ut 2
#define aa +
#define da -
#define ad &
#define au ++
bu su
ob cf
ue fu

ba ca
ww sc
uu at
fu tu

ed be ed ft ed as ed ua ed db ed ef ed cc ed
sf ed tc ed cb
ed ea ed fo ed dt ed ub ed ot ae
af st ab xx at ci rc um
lo cu ti on af ba yy af bu
zz af ds ob yy at fs
af yy ac ww sc fs uu sa ob ut
ab ut ab ut ab ut ue aa ww
sc ut uu sa ob ut aa ut aa
ut aa ut tt ut ue af
yy au ue ds ob zz at de ww tt
de ww sc fs uu ab
ob ww sc ut tt ut uu sa ob ww
sc ut aa ut tt ut uu sa
ob ut ab ut ab ut ab ut ab
ut aa ut tt ut ue ue
ue ec ob ww sc ut ab ut
ab ut uu tt ob ut aa ut aa ut
ue sc ww uu ue af zz cs ut
tt ut da ut af zz of de ww tt
de ww sc fs uu ec
ob ut tt ut ue ue od ob ob ob ww sc
yy uu ec zz
ue ad ob ww sc ut aa ut aa ut uu tt
fc ue ue sc xx uu ue af us fs ac da ut af ae
--
Richard Heathfield
Email: rjh at cpax dot org dot uk
"Usenet is a strange place" - dmr 29 July 1999
Sig line 4 vacant - apply within
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2019-12-02 18:37:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by Richard Heathfield
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Richard Heathfield
Post by Anders D. Nygaard
Post by Richard Heathfield
<snip>
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Lewis
Post by Jerry Friedman
When I think of a thinko, I mean thinking of the wrong thing--a
malapropism, for example.  If I omit a word, as I do, I was thinking of
it, so that's not a thinko--more like a typo.
And a thinko can be spoken too, but if it is an error in what you typed,
including leaving out words, adding words, or traveling letters, it's a
tyop.
Then there's the "Cut & Paste-o" where changes have been made, but not
quite ironed out.
for(i = 0; i < x; i++)
{
   for(j = 0; j < y; i++)
   {
     puts("Huh?");
   }
}
Review comment: Did you really intend an infinite loop here?
It was intended as an example of a "cut & paste-o".
Yes, but it appears to be in C, the original write-only language, not
intended to be understood by yuman beans.
It is indeed in C, which can't hold a candle to Perl when it comes to
incomprehensibility
You're right about that. I used Perl for a while, not because I thought
it was a nice clear language but when I wanted it to do things I
couldn't easily do in other languages. The only way to write Perl was
to write something more or less correct and then tweak it until the
results came out as I wanted.

Back in 1973, before I had heard of Edsger Dijkstra or Niklaus Wirth,
and when I still thought it was clever to write programs that were
difficult for humans to understand, I wrote a progam in Fortran that I
was proud of to determine the median of a set of values. It had about
20 lines, and almost every one was the target of an IF (condition) GOTO
statement. I submitted it to the algorithm section of the Computer
Journal. After a remarkably long time I received a report that asked
for some changes (not to the program but to the text). I resubmitted
it, and after more than 40 years it's still under consideration -- at
least, they've never told me that it isn't.
Post by Richard Heathfield
- and Perl is way behind Brainf**k, which - believe it or not - is a
very poor third to two very beautiful languages.
One of them is called Whitespace, which recognises only space, tab, and
newline as meaningful. If there is any actual text in there, it's
regarded as a comment!
The other, Piet, regards only colour as significant (and Piet programs
look remarkably like Piet Mondrian paintings).
But if you'd like to see an example of some reasonably unreadable C,
I'm glad to oblige with a program wot I did wrote myself a few years
#include <stdio.h>
#define ob (
#define fu {
#define sc [
#define at =
#define ed ,
#define of -=
#define bu int
#define st char
#define ca long
#define de sizeof
#define od putchar
#define be 223358231
#define ft 942800930
#define ua 637602332
#define db 353174034
#define ef 709379359
#define tu 1275678223
#define as 1426395964
#define cc 1295460160
#define ci "Some"
#define rc " C pr"
#define um "ograms ar"
#define lo "e easy to read. Others are not. I like cryptic ones best"
#define cu ". How abo"
#define ti "ut yo"
#define on "u?\n"
#define cb 1414996287
#define fo 1129261318
#define ub 1026314584
#define sf 892273737
#define tc 506856216
#define ea 604783114
#define dt 876481060
#define ot 877025626
#define ba unsigned
#define fc 2781879
#define us return
#define su main
#define cf void
#define ds for
#define ec >>
#define tt /
#define sa %
#define uu ]
#define ae }
#define ue )
#define af ;
#define ab *
#define ac <
#define fs 0
#define cs >
#define ut 2
#define aa +
#define da -
#define ad &
#define au ++
bu su
ob cf
ue fu
ba ca
ww sc
uu at
fu tu
ed be ed ft ed as ed ua ed db ed ef ed cc ed
sf ed tc ed cb
ed ea ed fo ed dt ed ub ed ot ae
af st ab xx at ci rc um
lo cu ti on af ba yy af bu
zz af ds ob yy at fs
af yy ac ww sc fs uu sa ob ut
ab ut ab ut ab ut ue aa ww
sc ut uu sa ob ut aa ut aa
ut aa ut tt ut ue af
yy au ue ds ob zz at de ww tt
de ww sc fs uu ab
ob ww sc ut tt ut uu sa ob ww
sc ut aa ut tt ut uu sa
ob ut ab ut ab ut ab ut ab
ut aa ut tt ut ue ue
ue ec ob ww sc ut ab ut
ab ut uu tt ob ut aa ut aa ut
ue sc ww uu ue af zz cs ut
tt ut da ut af zz of de ww tt
de ww sc fs uu ec
ob ut tt ut ue ue od ob ob ob ww sc
yy uu ec zz
ue ad ob ww sc ut aa ut aa ut uu tt
fc ue ue sc xx uu ue af us fs ac da ut af ae
--
athel
Peter Moylan
2019-12-03 02:28:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Richard Heathfield
Post by Anders D. Nygaard
Post by Richard Heathfield
for(i = 0; i < x; i++)
{
for(j = 0; j < y; i++)
{
puts("Huh?");
}
}
Review comment: Did you really intend an infinite loop here?
It was intended as an example of a "cut & paste-o".
Yes, but it appears to be in C, the original write-only language, not
intended to be understood by yuman beans.
It's true that C code can be hard to read, and it's made worse by the
tradition of having as few comments as possible. For unreadability,
though, it's hard to beat APL.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Paul Carmichael
2019-12-03 10:42:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
It's true that C code can be hard to read, and it's made worse by the
tradition of having as few comments as possible.
We used to do weekly code reviews. Any change without clear comments was rejected, no
matter how wonderful the code was.
--
Paul.

https://paulc.es
Peter Moylan
2019-12-02 00:09:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Then there's the "Cut & Paste-o" where changes have been made, but
not quite ironed out.
We were more careful about cut and paste back when it was literally done
with scissors and sticky tape (or paste).
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
b***@shaw.ca
2019-12-02 00:46:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Sam Plusnet
Then there's the "Cut & Paste-o" where changes have been made, but
not quite ironed out.
We were more careful about cut and paste back when it was literally done
with scissors and sticky tape (or paste).
I met my wife when she was a paste-up person at a local newspaper
I was writing for. But it was done with sharp blades, such as those
on X-Acto/exacto knives, rather than scissors.

bill
Lewis
2019-12-02 09:16:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Sam Plusnet
Then there's the "Cut & Paste-o" where changes have been made, but
not quite ironed out.
We were more careful about cut and paste back when it was literally done
with scissors and sticky tape (or paste).
I do not miss cutting (with sharp knives, not scissors) and pasting
(using a sort of rubber cement, iirc, not tape). Not at all.
--
Disorder is merely the order you were not looking for." Henri Bergson
Ken Blake
2019-12-01 19:20:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lewis
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by b***@shaw.ca
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Mark Brader
Post by Paul Carmichael
"No matter good the material, we still have to learn it."
Looks like a typo to me.
More than a typo, I think. If we take the second part of the sentence
into account, the first part should be "No matter how bad the material".
Yes, but omitting a word is a kind of typo, at least to me. It's an
error I often make while typing, but never while writing.
We have a better word for that, relatively new to me: "thinko".
"Typo" is short for typographical error, and in practice it means
your fat fingers hit one or more letters you didn't intend. That's
not the case when you omit a word, even though you were thinking it
as you typed. I do that all the time.
When I think of a thinko, I mean thinking of the wrong thing--a
malapropism, for example. If I omit a word, as I do, I was thinking of
it, so that's not a thinko--more like a typo.
And a thinko can be spoken too,
Thus becoming more specifically a "slip of the tongue".
...or sometimes a spoonerism.
--
Ken
RH Draney
2019-11-30 20:41:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Mark Brader
Post by Paul Carmichael
Is this accepted LP usage?
Long-playing, Lower Peninsula, lumbar puncture, ...
To avoid confusion, I write 33 rather than LP.
LP stands for Liquefied Propane...HTH, HAND....r
Richard Heathfield
2019-11-30 12:08:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mark Brader
Post by Paul Carmichael
"No matter good the material, we still have to learn it."
Looks like a typo to me.
Post by Paul Carmichael
Is this accepted LP usage?
Long-playing, Lower Peninsula, lumbar puncture, ...
My best guess was "Linguistic Profile".
--
Richard Heathfield
Email: rjh at cpax dot org dot uk
"Usenet is a strange place" - dmr 29 July 1999
Sig line 4 vacant - apply within
Paul Carmichael
2019-11-30 12:33:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mark Brader
Post by Paul Carmichael
"No matter good the material, we still have to learn it."
Looks like a typo to me.
Post by Paul Carmichael
Is this accepted LP usage?
Long-playing, Lower Peninsula, lumbar puncture, ...
leftpondian
--
Paul.

https://paulc.es
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2019-11-30 14:09:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by Paul Carmichael
Post by Mark Brader
Post by Paul Carmichael
"No matter good the material, we still have to learn it."
Looks like a typo to me.
Post by Paul Carmichael
Is this accepted LP usage?
Long-playing, Lower Peninsula, lumbar puncture, ...
leftpondian
Maybe, but you're confirming the inadvisability of using unknown
abbreviations that I discussed under the heading ICB2020.
--
athel
Paul Carmichael
2019-11-30 14:47:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by Paul Carmichael
Post by Mark Brader
Post by Paul Carmichael
"No matter good the material, we still have to learn it."
Looks like a typo to me.
Post by Paul Carmichael
Is this accepted LP usage?
Long-playing, Lower Peninsula, lumbar puncture, ...
leftpondian
Maybe, but you're confirming the inadvisability of using unknown abbreviations that I
discussed under the heading ICB2020.
It's called laziness.
--
Paul.

https://paulc.es
Jack
2019-11-30 17:23:58 UTC
Permalink
On Sat, 30 Nov 2019 15:09:30 +0100, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Paul Carmichael
Post by Mark Brader
Post by Paul Carmichael
"No matter good the material, we still have to learn it."
Looks like a typo to me.
Post by Paul Carmichael
Is this accepted LP usage?
Long-playing, Lower Peninsula, lumbar puncture, ...
leftpondian
Maybe, but you're confirming the inadvisability of using unknown
abbreviations that I discussed under the heading ICB20
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2019-11-30 17:29:37 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jack
On Sat, 30 Nov 2019 15:09:30 +0100, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Paul Carmichael
Post by Mark Brader
Post by Paul Carmichael
"No matter good the material, we still have to learn it."
Looks like a typo to me.
Post by Paul Carmichael
Is this accepted LP usage?
Long-playing, Lower Peninsula, lumbar puncture, ...
leftpondian
Maybe, but you're confirming the inadvisability of using unknown
abbreviations that I discussed under the heading ICB2020.
Looking at your post, I see 'G'.
Yes, ICG2020. I'm not getting any younger.
--
athel
Lewis
2019-11-30 21:18:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by Paul Carmichael
"No matter good the material, we still have to learn it."
Is this accepted LP usage?
No. Someone left out the word "how" and there was no (competent) editor.
--
If you mixed vodka with orange juice and Milk Of Magnesia, would you
get a Philip's Screwdriver?
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