Discussion:
English word for dunking a cookie
(too old to reply)
John E. Davis
2014-05-13 19:42:34 UTC
Permalink
Hi,

I am under the impression that there is an English word for the
process or game of dunking a cookie (biscuit) into a liquid (coffee or
tea) to saturate the cookie with the liquid but not so much that the
cookie falls apart. What is the word for this process, assuming that
one exists?

Thanks,
--John
William
2014-05-13 19:53:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by John E. Davis
I am under the impression that there is an English word for the
process or game of dunking a cookie (biscuit) into a liquid (coffee or
tea) to saturate the cookie with the liquid but not so much that the
cookie falls apart. What is the word for this process, assuming that
one exists?
That would be "dunking". Only, it's a biscuit not a cookie.
--
William
Mack A. Damia
2014-05-13 20:47:37 UTC
Permalink
On Tue, 13 May 2014 12:53:19 -0700 (PDT), William
Post by William
Post by John E. Davis
I am under the impression that there is an English word for the
process or game of dunking a cookie (biscuit) into a liquid (coffee or
tea) to saturate the cookie with the liquid but not so much that the
cookie falls apart. What is the word for this process, assuming that
one exists?
That would be "dunking". Only, it's a biscuit not a cookie.
I had a girlfriend years ago who would order her eggs sunny side up in
a restaurant because she liked "dippies".

--
R H Draney
2014-05-13 20:58:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mack A. Damia
I had a girlfriend years ago who would order her eggs sunny side up in
a restaurant because she liked "dippies".
You can't dip in a sunny-side-up egg any more because the restaurant business
has decided that egg yolks must be cooked to the consistency of powdered
chalk...I make a point of ordering my eggs "runny side up" to get my
requirements across....r
--
Me? Sarcastic?
Yeah, right.
Mack A. Damia
2014-05-13 21:02:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by R H Draney
Post by Mack A. Damia
I had a girlfriend years ago who would order her eggs sunny side up in
a restaurant because she liked "dippies".
You can't dip in a sunny-side-up egg any more because the restaurant business
has decided that egg yolks must be cooked to the consistency of powdered
chalk...I make a point of ordering my eggs "runny side up" to get my
requirements across....r
Years ago when I ate breakfast frequently in local diners, I would
order eggs, "soft-scrambled", otherwise, you would be able to re-sole
your shoes with it.

--
Mike L
2014-05-13 22:22:41 UTC
Permalink
On Tue, 13 May 2014 14:02:43 -0700, Mack A. Damia
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by R H Draney
Post by Mack A. Damia
I had a girlfriend years ago who would order her eggs sunny side up in
a restaurant because she liked "dippies".
Disgusting. Way back when, we had to endure watching a fellow-student
preparing his fried egg for comestion. He'd puncture the yolk, fill
the hole with HP sauce, then stir it carefully. The kind of thing you
can't tear your eyes away from, however hard you try.
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by R H Draney
You can't dip in a sunny-side-up egg any more because the restaurant business
has decided that egg yolks must be cooked to the consistency of powdered
chalk...I make a point of ordering my eggs "runny side up" to get my
requirements across....r
Years ago when I ate breakfast frequently in local diners, I would
order eggs, "soft-scrambled", otherwise, you would be able to re-sole
your shoes with it.
Wise move.
--
Mike.
Mack A. Damia
2014-05-13 23:05:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike L
On Tue, 13 May 2014 14:02:43 -0700, Mack A. Damia
Post by Mack A. Damia
I had a girlfriend years ago who would order her eggs sunny side up in
a restaurant because she liked "dippies".
Disgusting. Way back when, we had to endure watching a fellow-student
preparing his fried egg for comestion. He'd puncture the yolk, fill
the hole with HP sauce, then stir it carefully. The kind of thing you
can't tear your eyes away from, however hard you try.
You mean you never had a boiled egg with toy soldiers?

I have heard of others putting HP on eggs, but I reserve it for meat
and bacon butties.

--
Robert Bannister
2014-05-14 03:59:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by Mike L
On Tue, 13 May 2014 14:02:43 -0700, Mack A. Damia
Post by Mack A. Damia
I had a girlfriend years ago who would order her eggs sunny side up in
a restaurant because she liked "dippies".
Disgusting. Way back when, we had to endure watching a fellow-student
preparing his fried egg for comestion. He'd puncture the yolk, fill
the hole with HP sauce, then stir it carefully. The kind of thing you
can't tear your eyes away from, however hard you try.
You mean you never had a boiled egg with toy soldiers?
I have heard of others putting HP on eggs, but I reserve it for meat
and bacon butties.
Fish, for me. I can only eat fish without HP if fresh, burn-your-fingers
hot from the chiperie. Sausages, OTOH, require tomato sauce. I can't
imagine any kind of sauce on a bacon sarnie.

As for meat sandwiches, I'd need to know more before deciding whether
any kind of sauce was permissable or not - perhaps sauce Robert or sauce
Béarnaise.
--
Robert Bannister - 1940-71 SE England
1972-now W Australia
Mack A. Damia
2014-05-14 04:15:58 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 14 May 2014 11:59:43 +0800, Robert Bannister
Post by Robert Bannister
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by Mike L
On Tue, 13 May 2014 14:02:43 -0700, Mack A. Damia
Post by Mack A. Damia
I had a girlfriend years ago who would order her eggs sunny side up in
a restaurant because she liked "dippies".
Disgusting. Way back when, we had to endure watching a fellow-student
preparing his fried egg for comestion. He'd puncture the yolk, fill
the hole with HP sauce, then stir it carefully. The kind of thing you
can't tear your eyes away from, however hard you try.
You mean you never had a boiled egg with toy soldiers?
I have heard of others putting HP on eggs, but I reserve it for meat
and bacon butties.
Fish, for me. I can only eat fish without HP if fresh, burn-your-fingers
hot from the chiperie. Sausages, OTOH, require tomato sauce. I can't
imagine any kind of sauce on a bacon sarnie.
You probably get the loin or back bacon where you are - the same cut
of bacon that is sold in England.

The only bacon you will find in supermarkets in the U.S. is streaky
bacon - and maybe Canadian bacon (close but not the loin cut). There
are some specialty (import) shops that will sell loin bacon, but they
are far and few between.

There is a huge difference. Loin/back bacon is much tastier, and our
family could never understand why it isn't commonly sold.

http://www.clancysofchester.co.uk/bacon.html

--
Tak To
2014-05-14 21:30:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Wed, 14 May 2014 11:59:43 +0800, Robert Bannister
Post by Robert Bannister
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by Mike L
On Tue, 13 May 2014 14:02:43 -0700, Mack A. Damia
Post by Mack A. Damia
I had a girlfriend years ago who would order her eggs sunny side up in
a restaurant because she liked "dippies".
Disgusting. Way back when, we had to endure watching a fellow-student
preparing his fried egg for comestion. He'd puncture the yolk, fill
the hole with HP sauce, then stir it carefully. The kind of thing you
can't tear your eyes away from, however hard you try.
You mean you never had a boiled egg with toy soldiers?
I have heard of others putting HP on eggs, but I reserve it for meat
and bacon butties.
Fish, for me. I can only eat fish without HP if fresh, burn-your-fingers
hot from the chiperie. Sausages, OTOH, require tomato sauce. I can't
imagine any kind of sauce on a bacon sarnie.
You probably get the loin or back bacon where you are - the same cut
of bacon that is sold in England.
The only bacon you will find in supermarkets in the U.S. is streaky
bacon -
Yes, made from the belly.
Post by Mack A. Damia
and maybe Canadian bacon (close but not the loin cut). There
are some specialty (import) shops that will sell loin bacon, but they
are far and few between.
There is a huge difference. Loin/back bacon is much tastier, and our
family could never understand why it isn't commonly sold.
http://www.clancysofchester.co.uk/bacon.html
Too lean?

Tak
--
----------------------------------------------------------------+-----
Tak To ***@alum.mit.eduxx
--------------------------------------------------------------------^^
[taode takto ~{LU5B~}] NB: trim the xx to get my real email addr
Mack A. Damia
2014-05-14 22:47:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tak To
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Wed, 14 May 2014 11:59:43 +0800, Robert Bannister
Post by Robert Bannister
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by Mike L
On Tue, 13 May 2014 14:02:43 -0700, Mack A. Damia
Post by Mack A. Damia
I had a girlfriend years ago who would order her eggs sunny side up in
a restaurant because she liked "dippies".
Disgusting. Way back when, we had to endure watching a fellow-student
preparing his fried egg for comestion. He'd puncture the yolk, fill
the hole with HP sauce, then stir it carefully. The kind of thing you
can't tear your eyes away from, however hard you try.
You mean you never had a boiled egg with toy soldiers?
I have heard of others putting HP on eggs, but I reserve it for meat
and bacon butties.
Fish, for me. I can only eat fish without HP if fresh, burn-your-fingers
hot from the chiperie. Sausages, OTOH, require tomato sauce. I can't
imagine any kind of sauce on a bacon sarnie.
You probably get the loin or back bacon where you are - the same cut
of bacon that is sold in England.
The only bacon you will find in supermarkets in the U.S. is streaky
bacon -
Yes, made from the belly.
Post by Mack A. Damia
and maybe Canadian bacon (close but not the loin cut). There
are some specialty (import) shops that will sell loin bacon, but they
are far and few between.
There is a huge difference. Loin/back bacon is much tastier, and our
family could never understand why it isn't commonly sold.
http://www.clancysofchester.co.uk/bacon.html
Too lean?
It could be, but it seems to me that the major streaky bacon
processors in the U.S., such as Oscar Mayer, pride themselves in
selling lean bacon with not too much fat.

If you look at the photos I provided, there is plenty of fat to keep
the meat moist, and why is loin/back bacon so popular in the U.K. and
relatively unheard of in the U.S?

--
Robert Bannister
2014-05-15 00:59:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Wed, 14 May 2014 11:59:43 +0800, Robert Bannister
Post by Robert Bannister
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by Mike L
On Tue, 13 May 2014 14:02:43 -0700, Mack A. Damia
Post by Mack A. Damia
I had a girlfriend years ago who would order her eggs sunny side up in
a restaurant because she liked "dippies".
Disgusting. Way back when, we had to endure watching a fellow-student
preparing his fried egg for comestion. He'd puncture the yolk, fill
the hole with HP sauce, then stir it carefully. The kind of thing you
can't tear your eyes away from, however hard you try.
You mean you never had a boiled egg with toy soldiers?
I have heard of others putting HP on eggs, but I reserve it for meat
and bacon butties.
Fish, for me. I can only eat fish without HP if fresh, burn-your-fingers
hot from the chiperie. Sausages, OTOH, require tomato sauce. I can't
imagine any kind of sauce on a bacon sarnie.
You probably get the loin or back bacon where you are - the same cut
of bacon that is sold in England.
The only bacon you will find in supermarkets in the U.S. is streaky
bacon - and maybe Canadian bacon (close but not the loin cut). There
are some specialty (import) shops that will sell loin bacon, but they
are far and few between.
There is a huge difference. Loin/back bacon is much tastier, and our
family could never understand why it isn't commonly sold.
http://www.clancysofchester.co.uk/bacon.html
Bacon here is mainly sold in full lengths, including both the back and
streaky ends.
--
Robert Bannister - 1940-71 SE England
1972-now W Australia
Peter Moylan
2014-05-13 23:22:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by R H Draney
Post by Mack A. Damia
I had a girlfriend years ago who would order her eggs sunny side up
in a restaurant because she liked "dippies".
You can't dip in a sunny-side-up egg any more because the restaurant
business has decided that egg yolks must be cooked to the consistency
of powdered chalk...I make a point of ordering my eggs "runny side
up" to get my requirements across....r
A restaurant that tried that here would soon be out of business. The
whole point of fried, poached, or soft-boiled eggs is that the yolk must
be liquid.

WIWAL soft-boiled eggs were always accompanied by toast "soldiers" that
could be dipped in the yolk.
--
Peter Moylan, Newcastle, NSW, Australia. http://www.pmoylan.org
For an e-mail address, see my web page.
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2014-05-14 12:03:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by William
Post by John E. Davis
I am under the impression that there is an English word for the
process or game of dunking a cookie (biscuit) into a liquid (coffee or
tea) to saturate the cookie with the liquid but not so much that the
cookie falls apart. What is the word for this process, assuming that
one exists?
That would be "dunking". Only, it's a biscuit not a cookie.
I don't agree: "dunk" is an American term for what in England was
called "dip" WIWAL (maybe no longer in the Americanized present) and
goes better with the American word "cookie".

Anyway, I've never seen the point of taking a nice crisp biscuit and
transforming it into a soggy mess. However, plenty of people seem to
like Weetabix as a cereal, which becomes a soggy mess when you pour
milk on it, so I may be in a minority.
--
athel
Mike Barnes
2014-05-14 12:09:51 UTC
Permalink
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by William
Post by John E. Davis
I am under the impression that there is an English word for the
process or game of dunking a cookie (biscuit) into a liquid (coffee or
tea) to saturate the cookie with the liquid but not so much that the
cookie falls apart. What is the word for this process, assuming that
one exists?
That would be "dunking". Only, it's a biscuit not a cookie.
I don't agree: "dunk" is an American term for what in England was
called "dip" WIWAL (maybe no longer in the Americanized present) and
goes better with the American word "cookie".
That depends on what you call the "present". I remember "dunking" from
the mid-60s I believe.
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Anyway, I've never seen the point of taking a nice crisp biscuit and
transforming it into a soggy mess. However, plenty of people seem to
like Weetabix as a cereal, which becomes a soggy mess when you pour
milk on it, so I may be in a minority.
I'm in the same minority, on both counts.
--
Mike Barnes
Cheshire, England
R H Draney
2014-05-14 21:25:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike Barnes
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Anyway, I've never seen the point of taking a nice crisp biscuit and
transforming it into a soggy mess. However, plenty of people seem to
like Weetabix as a cereal, which becomes a soggy mess when you pour
milk on it, so I may be in a minority.
I'm in the same minority, on both counts.
A couple of years ago I provided myself some entertainment by throwing a few
pretzels out onto a parking lot and watching the local grackles discover
them...one carried the first piece into the shade of a nearby van and set to
work breaking it up and eating it...once he'd pretty much finished it off, he
hopped over to a nearby landscaping box to quench his understandable thirst from
the puddle left by the irrigation....

His next action was to return to where the pretzels were...this time, he picked
one up and carried it straight to the puddle and dropped it in....

Since then I've told this story as illustration of avian intelligence...within
the space of under ten minutes, this bird had found an unexpected food source,
discovered a drawback of eating it in the form presented, developed a plan to
overcome that drawback, and put that plan into action....r
--
Me? Sarcastic?
Yeah, right.
LFS
2014-05-14 12:14:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Anyway, I've never seen the point of taking a nice crisp biscuit and
transforming it into a soggy mess.
Biscotti are very hard: dunking softens them just enough but doesn't
make them soggy. Dunking cantuccini into vin santo is de rigeur, I believe.

However, plenty of people seem to
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
like Weetabix as a cereal, which becomes a soggy mess when you pour milk
on it, so I may be in a minority.
I have heard of people who eat them dry, spread with stuff. That is
seriously weird.
--
Laura (emulate St George for email)
Mack A. Damia
2014-05-14 12:37:05 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 14 May 2014 13:14:20 +0100, LFS
Post by LFS
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Anyway, I've never seen the point of taking a nice crisp biscuit and
transforming it into a soggy mess.
Biscotti are very hard: dunking softens them just enough but doesn't
make them soggy. Dunking cantuccini into vin santo is de rigeur, I believe.
However, plenty of people seem to
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
like Weetabix as a cereal, which becomes a soggy mess when you pour milk
on it, so I may be in a minority.
I have heard of people who eat them dry, spread with stuff. That is
seriously weird.
Weetabix seems to be one of those foods that you either love or hate.

I have heard others suggest that it would be good material for
insulating homes.

I happen to enjoy it and can find supermarkets in California that sell
it.

--
Mike Barnes
2014-05-14 12:51:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by LFS
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
like Weetabix as a cereal, which becomes a soggy mess when you pour milk
on it, so I may be in a minority.
I have heard of people who eat them dry, spread with stuff. That is
seriously weird.
Think of them as an alternative to crispbread. Don't fall for that
ridiculous "serving suggestion" on the packet: pour milk on them? why
would anyone do that? would you do it to crispbread?
--
Mike Barnes
Cheshire, England
Oliver Cromm
2014-05-14 13:48:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike Barnes
Post by LFS
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
like Weetabix as a cereal, which becomes a soggy mess when you pour milk
on it, so I may be in a minority.
I have heard of people who eat them dry, spread with stuff. That is
seriously weird.
Think of them as an alternative to crispbread. Don't fall for that
ridiculous "serving suggestion" on the packet: pour milk on them? why
would anyone do that? would you do it to crispbread?
Well, you can bite on crispbread (which my wife insists on calling
"crackers") and it doesn't explode into a cloud of dust that may
choke you.

I agree that you shouldn't leave the Weetabix in the milk, I just
dunk them.
--
ASCII to ASCII, DOS to DOS
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2014-05-14 15:01:27 UTC
Permalink
On 2014-05-14 15:48:33 +0200, Oliver Cromm
Post by Oliver Cromm
Post by Mike Barnes
Post by LFS
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
like Weetabix as a cereal, which becomes a soggy mess when you pour milk
on it, so I may be in a minority.
I have heard of people who eat them dry, spread with stuff. That is
seriously weird.
Think of them as an alternative to crispbread. Don't fall for that
ridiculous "serving suggestion" on the packet: pour milk on them? why
would anyone do that? would you do it to crispbread?
Well, you can bite on crispbread (which my wife insists on calling
"crackers") and it doesn't explode into a cloud of dust that may
choke you.
I agree that you shouldn't leave the Weetabix in the milk, I just
dunk them.
It still turns into a soggy mess almost instantaneously.
--
athel
Peter Moylan
2014-05-15 02:17:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike Barnes
Post by LFS
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
like Weetabix as a cereal, which becomes a soggy mess when you pour milk
on it, so I may be in a minority.
I have heard of people who eat them dry, spread with stuff. That is
seriously weird.
Think of them as an alternative to crispbread. Don't fall for that
ridiculous "serving suggestion" on the packet: pour milk on them? why
would anyone do that? would you do it to crispbread?
Bread and milk was a common enough breakfast WIWAL. Bread was delivered
every day, and so was milk, so there was always some in the house, but
if we ran out of cereal it wouldn't be replaced until the fortnightly
shopping trip.
--
Peter Moylan, Newcastle, NSW, Australia. http://www.pmoylan.org
For an e-mail address, see my web page.
Mike L
2014-05-14 22:53:30 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 14 May 2014 13:14:20 +0100, LFS
Post by LFS
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Anyway, I've never seen the point of taking a nice crisp biscuit and
transforming it into a soggy mess.
Biscotti are very hard: dunking softens them just enough but doesn't
make them soggy. Dunking cantuccini into vin santo is de rigeur, I believe.
However, plenty of people seem to
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
like Weetabix as a cereal, which becomes a soggy mess when you pour milk
on it, so I may be in a minority.
I have heard of people who eat them dry, spread with stuff. That is
seriously weird.
In my childhood, it was either butter or peanut butter. I like them,
too, but find that supermarket's own brand is less prone to sog than
the echt thing. The best way to get the wheat flavour while retaining
some of the crispness is to crumble them roughly onto whatever other
cereal one's having (in my case, raw rolled oats soaked in milk: used
to have Basics muesli, but I simplicated).
--
Mike.
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2014-05-14 13:48:51 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 14 May 2014 14:03:10 +0200, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by William
Post by John E. Davis
I am under the impression that there is an English word for the
process or game of dunking a cookie (biscuit) into a liquid (coffee or
tea) to saturate the cookie with the liquid but not so much that the
cookie falls apart. What is the word for this process, assuming that
one exists?
That would be "dunking". Only, it's a biscuit not a cookie.
I don't agree: "dunk" is an American term for what in England was
called "dip" WIWAL (maybe no longer in the Americanized present) and
goes better with the American word "cookie".
Anyway, I've never seen the point of taking a nice crisp biscuit and
transforming it into a soggy mess.
It's not a matter of making the bisuit wet. It's about making the drink
less wet.

The slogan of McVitie's Rich Tea Biscuits was "A drinks's too wet
without one".
https://www.flickr.com/photos/cblanchfield/5346390622/

Discussion:
https://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20090307025928AAhA3mE

Is yours too wet without one?
just having a cup of coffee, do you have to have a biscuit with
yours?

....
puffin57 answered 5 years ago
I do like a biscuit with a coffee, but it isn't too essential.
However, I feel that way with tea - it is far too wet without a
biscuit!

I actually can't really understand it - saying a coffee/tea is too
wet. After all, it is a liquid, so is bound to be wet! But, that is
the way it is - a drink can be 'too wet' without a biscuit.
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
However, plenty of people seem to
like Weetabix as a cereal, which becomes a soggy mess when you pour
milk on it, so I may be in a minority.
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
occam
2014-05-15 07:44:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Wed, 14 May 2014 14:03:10 +0200, Athel Cornish-Bowden
It's not a matter of making the bisuit wet. It's about making the drink
less wet.
Eh? The whole point of having a drink is because it is ... wet? I do
not see how dunking a biscuit makes the tea any less wet. McVitie's
marketing slogan may be memorable but it is meaningless, as with most
marketing messages.
Mike Barnes
2014-05-15 09:44:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by occam
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Wed, 14 May 2014 14:03:10 +0200, Athel Cornish-Bowden
It's not a matter of making the bisuit wet. It's about making the drink
less wet.
Eh? The whole point of having a drink is because it is ... wet? I do
not see how dunking a biscuit makes the tea any less wet. McVitie's
marketing slogan may be memorable but it is meaningless, as with most
marketing messages.
To some extent I agree with what you say. But the tea that has been
absorbed into the biscuit is less wet than the tea that hasn't.
--
Mike Barnes
Cheshire, England
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2014-05-15 10:27:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by occam
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Wed, 14 May 2014 14:03:10 +0200, Athel Cornish-Bowden
It's not a matter of making the bisuit wet. It's about making the drink
less wet.
Eh? The whole point of having a drink is because it is ... wet? I do
not see how dunking a biscuit makes the tea any less wet. McVitie's
marketing slogan may be memorable but it is meaningless, as with most
marketing messages.
Oddly, the marketing slogan did seem to match the experience of some
people even though the word "wet" would not have been technically
accurate.

If people felt the need to eat something "dry" to complement a cup of
tea then it is understandable that the dryness should be thought of as
counteracting the wetness.

In fact, it would not have been the wateryness of the tea but the taste
and other sensation it caused and left in the mouth that people liked to
complement with some dry food item.

Having said that I'd guess that the marketing slogan was derived by
reversing the notion that a biscuit is too dry without some tea.
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
occam
2014-05-15 07:35:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by William
Post by John E. Davis
I am under the impression that there is an English word for the
process or game of dunking a cookie (biscuit) into a liquid (coffee or
tea) to saturate the cookie with the liquid but not so much that the
cookie falls apart. What is the word for this process, assuming that
one exists?
That would be "dunking". Only, it's a biscuit not a cookie.
I don't agree: "dunk" is an American term for what in England was called
"dip" WIWAL (maybe no longer in the Americanized present) and goes
better with the American word "cookie".
That would make the well known outlet "Dippin' Donuts". Not quite the
same ring, is it? ;-)
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2014-05-15 15:07:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by occam
Post by William
Post by John E. Davis
I am under the impression that there is an English word for the
process or game of dunking a cookie (biscuit) into a liquid (coffee or
tea) to saturate the cookie with the liquid but not so much that the
cookie falls apart. What is the word for this process, assuming that
one exists?
That would be "dunking". Only, it's a biscuit not a cookie.
I don't agree: "dunk" is an American term for what in England was called
"dip" WIWAL (maybe no longer in the Americanized present) and goes
better with the American word "cookie".
That would make the well known outlet "Dippin' Donuts". Not quite the
same ring, is it? ;-)
That's an American chain, if I'm not mistaken, so it would be odd if
they didn't choose an American word for its name. In any case, if
they'd called it "Dipping Doughnuts" from the outset I expect we'd
think that its actual name didn't have the same ring.
--
athel
Oliver Cromm
2014-05-15 17:45:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by occam
I don't agree: "dunk" is an American term for what in England was called
"dip" WIWAL (maybe no longer in the Americanized present) and goes
better with the American word "cookie".
That would make the well known outlet "Dippin' Donuts". Not quite the
same ring, is it? ;-)
I have never tried dunking a donut, and I don't plan to. It never
even occurred to me that the name of the chain might refer to
dunking the donuts in a drink. Maybe I associated it with
basketball, because that's where I first learned the term "dunk".

Well, I guess all that's just funny things happening in a
furriner's brain.
--
"Bother", said the Borg, as they assimilated Pooh.
Peter T. Daniels
2014-05-15 21:07:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by Oliver Cromm
Post by occam
That would make the well known outlet "Dippin' Donuts". Not quite the
same ring, is it? ;-)
I have never tried dunking a donut, and I don't plan to. It never
even occurred to me that the name of the chain might refer to
dunking the donuts in a drink.
It makes one wonder what you think a donut is.

The quintessential donut, ideal for dunking, was the variety offered
by the Chock Full o'Nuts luncheonette chain. It was a perfectly shaped
(presumably stamped with a cookie cutter rather than shaped by hand)
circular toroid (nearly square cross section), and quite dense.

At the grocery store you could get something somewhat similar in boxes:
round cross section, much more like cake, usually covered with powdered
sugar but also available plain. Entenmann's still offers those.

That was before donut shops popped up all over the place with overly
sweet glazed puffy things, let alone those stuffed with jelly, custard,
and who knows what-else.
Oliver Cromm
2014-05-16 16:43:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Oliver Cromm
Post by occam
That would make the well known outlet "Dippin' Donuts". Not quite the
same ring, is it? ;-)
I have never tried dunking a donut, and I don't plan to. It never
even occurred to me that the name of the chain might refer to
dunking the donuts in a drink.
It makes one wonder what you think a donut is.
The quintessential donut, ideal for dunking, was the variety offered
by the Chock Full o'Nuts luncheonette chain. It was a perfectly shaped
(presumably stamped with a cookie cutter rather than shaped by hand)
circular toroid (nearly square cross section), and quite dense.
Yes, it occurred to me after sending my last message that a plain
donut could be dunked, if not too thick. But a plain donut is
exactly the thing you don't usually buy in shops like "Dunkin
Donuts".

We have learned, though, that the quintessential donut or doughnut
can be different things, depending on the place. The ones I grew
up with in Germany, sold as "Bismarck" in supermarkets here in
Montreal, have no holes and are rather thick, so not very handy
for dunking, even if they don't have the typical filling.

(When we made them at home, we made maybe half without filling.
One of the two standard days for making donuts at home was Shrove
Tuesday. My dictionary tells me that Shrove Tuesday is also called
pancake day, and indeed, doughnuts are called "Pfannkuchen",
pancake, in half of Germany. The pancakes the day is named after
in English are standard flat pancakes, though, not deep-fried
stuff?)
--
If you kill one person, you go to jail; if you kill 20, you go
to an institution for the insane; if you kill 20,000, you get
political asylum. -- Reed Brody, special counsel
for prosecutions at Human Rights Watch
Tony Cooper
2014-05-16 17:15:33 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 16 May 2014 12:43:14 -0400, Oliver Cromm
Post by Oliver Cromm
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Oliver Cromm
Post by occam
That would make the well known outlet "Dippin' Donuts". Not quite the
same ring, is it? ;-)
I have never tried dunking a donut, and I don't plan to. It never
even occurred to me that the name of the chain might refer to
dunking the donuts in a drink.
It makes one wonder what you think a donut is.
The quintessential donut, ideal for dunking, was the variety offered
by the Chock Full o'Nuts luncheonette chain. It was a perfectly shaped
(presumably stamped with a cookie cutter rather than shaped by hand)
circular toroid (nearly square cross section), and quite dense.
Yes, it occurred to me after sending my last message that a plain
donut could be dunked, if not too thick. But a plain donut is
exactly the thing you don't usually buy in shops like "Dunkin
Donuts".
Dunkin Donuts sells "cake donuts", which are plain donuts, and they
are the ones preferred by dunkers.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando FL
Jerry Friedman
2014-05-16 17:51:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tony Cooper
On Fri, 16 May 2014 12:43:14 -0400, Oliver Cromm
...
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Oliver Cromm
Post by Peter T. Daniels
The quintessential donut, ideal for dunking, was the variety offered
by the Chock Full o'Nuts luncheonette chain. It was a perfectly shaped
(presumably stamped with a cookie cutter rather than shaped by hand)
circular toroid (nearly square cross section), and quite dense.
Yes, it occurred to me after sending my last message that a plain
donut could be dunked, if not too thick. But a plain donut is
exactly the thing you don't usually buy in shops like "Dunkin
Donuts".
Dunkin Donuts sells "cake donuts", which are plain donuts, and they
are the ones preferred by dunkers.
The fluffy ones are called "raised doughnuts", which is a bit misleading,
as cake doughnuts are raised too, just with baking powder, not yeast.

At one point in the brilliant fantasy novel /Little, Big/, by John
Crowley, the characters dance to old records (cross-thread alert). In
addition to "The Rose of Tralee", there's one that goes

Dunkin' donuts, yubba yubba.
Dunkin' donuts, yubba yubba.
Dunkin' donuts--splash! in the coffee!

I can't find anything about that song. Does anyone know it? I'm just
curious.
--
Jerry Friedman
R H Draney
2014-05-16 20:44:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jerry Friedman
At one point in the brilliant fantasy novel /Little, Big/, by John
Crowley, the characters dance to old records (cross-thread alert). In
addition to "The Rose of Tralee", there's one that goes
Dunkin' donuts, yubba yubba.
Dunkin' donuts, yubba yubba.
Dunkin' donuts--splash! in the coffee!
I can't find anything about that song. Does anyone know it? I'm just
curious.
I think I know why you're having trouble finding it:



....r
--
Me? Sarcastic?
Yeah, right.
Jerry Friedman
2014-05-17 04:09:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by R H Draney
Post by Jerry Friedman
At one point in the brilliant fantasy novel /Little, Big/, by John
Crowley, the characters dance to old records (cross-thread alert). In
addition to "The Rose of Tralee", there's one that goes
Dunkin' donuts, yubba yubba.
Dunkin' donuts, yubba yubba.
Dunkin' donuts--splash! in the coffee!
I can't find anything about that song. Does anyone know it? I'm just
curious.
http://youtu.be/ntUNRiC5-z0
Thanks. But I can't help suspecting that that's a kosherization of an
earlier song, maybe with "yubba yubba" in it.

Slim Gaillard showed up here recently as the guy who wrote or stole
"Down by the Station".
--
Jerry Friedman
R H Draney
2014-05-17 06:49:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by R H Draney
Post by Jerry Friedman
At one point in the brilliant fantasy novel /Little, Big/, by John
Crowley, the characters dance to old records (cross-thread alert). In
addition to "The Rose of Tralee", there's one that goes
Dunkin' donuts, yubba yubba.
Dunkin' donuts, yubba yubba.
Dunkin' donuts--splash! in the coffee!
I can't find anything about that song. Does anyone know it? I'm just
curious.
http://youtu.be/ntUNRiC5-z0
Thanks. But I can't help suspecting that that's a kosherization of an
earlier song, maybe with "yubba yubba" in it.
Maybe it's the other way round, that John Crowley made his own bastardized
version of "Dunkin' Bagel"...Slim's catalogue is heavy with songs about food,
much of it "ethnic"....
Post by Jerry Friedman
Slim Gaillard showed up here recently as the guy who wrote or stole
"Down by the Station".
And before that, I recall once linking to a clip of his "Yip Rock Heresy"
(another food song)....r
--
Me? Sarcastic?
Yeah, right.
Peter T. Daniels
2014-05-16 18:21:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by Oliver Cromm
(When we made them at home, we made maybe half without filling.
One of the two standard days for making donuts at home was Shrove
Tuesday. My dictionary tells me that Shrove Tuesday is also called
pancake day, and indeed, doughnuts are called "Pfannkuchen",
pancake, in half of Germany. The pancakes the day is named after
in English are standard flat pancakes, though, not deep-fried
stuff?)
Pancakes are made by pouring batter onto a hot griddle, waiting till
a few bubbles appear on the surface, then flipping them dextrouxly
with a flipper (a spatula) to brown the other side.

The batter is made from boxed pancake mix and water, or else from
flour, baking soda, an egg, and milk. (If you're making waffles
instead, add corn oil so that they crisp a bit in the waffle iron.)

Crepes are basically the same thing but the batter is much thinner,
so they cook much more quickly and are harder to get right.
Oliver Cromm
2014-05-20 21:06:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Oliver Cromm
(When we made them at home, we made maybe half without filling.
One of the two standard days for making donuts at home was Shrove
Tuesday. My dictionary tells me that Shrove Tuesday is also called
pancake day, and indeed, doughnuts are called "Pfannkuchen",
pancake, in half of Germany. The pancakes the day is named after
in English are standard flat pancakes, though, not deep-fried
stuff?)
Pancakes are made by pouring batter onto a hot griddle, waiting till
a few bubbles appear on the surface, then flipping them dextrouxly
with a flipper (a spatula) to brown the other side.
The batter is made from boxed pancake mix and water, or else from
flour, baking soda, an egg, and milk. (If you're making waffles
instead, add corn oil so that they crisp a bit in the waffle iron.)
Crepes are basically the same thing but the batter is much thinner,
so they cook much more quickly and are harder to get right.
German pancakes, at least at home, where a griddle is not standard
equipment, are usually prepared in a frying pan, which would
explain the name, by the way. And at home is the place I eat most
of my pancakes - they are too easy to make to be worth paying
people to do it. People serious about crepes usually use
specialized equipment, in my experience.

Your answer to my question is on the wrong level, since it only
refers to one, the currently most standard meaning of the word,
while the question arises from variations between regional usages
in German.

My observation is about two things:

Thing English German associated
name name custom
(standard asterisked)

Sweet #1 *pancake, *Pfannkuchen, eat on Shrove
hot cake, Eierkuchen, Tuesday (English-
flapjack, Fladen, ... speaking areas)
...

Sweet #2 *donut, *Berliner, eat on Shrove
Bismarck, Pfannkuchen, Tuesday (German-
Berlin donut, Krapfen, speaking areas)
... ...

Although they are different sweets, they somehow share an
associated custom, and they share one name across variants of
German. So they seem to be related, and I was wondering if they
are interchangeable in any way in English. Is "pancake" used
regionally or was it historically for any kind of donut? Or are
donuts eaten on Shrove Tuesday instead of pancakes anywhere in the
English-speaking world?

Maybe the custom was originally just to eat some kind of fried
flour product, and was later specialized differently in the
respective localities?
--
'Ah yes, we got that keyboard from Small Gods when they threw out
their organ. Unfortunately for complex theological reasons they
would only give us the white keys, so we can only program in C'.
Colin Fine in sci.lang
Peter T. Daniels
2014-05-21 04:36:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by Oliver Cromm
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Oliver Cromm
(When we made them at home, we made maybe half without filling.
One of the two standard days for making donuts at home was Shrove
Tuesday. My dictionary tells me that Shrove Tuesday is also called
pancake day, and indeed, doughnuts are called "Pfannkuchen",
pancake, in half of Germany. The pancakes the day is named after
in English are standard flat pancakes, though, not deep-fried
stuff?)
Pancakes are made by pouring batter onto a hot griddle, waiting till
a few bubbles appear on the surface, then flipping them dextrouxly
with a flipper (a spatula) to brown the other side.
The batter is made from boxed pancake mix and water, or else from
flour, baking soda, an egg, and milk. (If you're making waffles
instead, add corn oil so that they crisp a bit in the waffle iron.)
Crepes are basically the same thing but the batter is much thinner,
so they cook much more quickly and are harder to get right.
German pancakes, at least at home, where a griddle is not standard
equipment, are usually prepared in a frying pan,
Frying pans take up a lot less space than griddles, but you can only
make one pancake at a time (or 2-3 very small ones).

"Griddle cake" is a dialectal equivalent of "pancake."
Post by Oliver Cromm
which would
explain the name, by the way. And at home is the place I eat most
of my pancakes - they are too easy to make to be worth paying
people to do it. People serious about crepes usually use
specialized equipment, in my experience.
You use the _outside_ (the convex side) of a crepe pan.
Post by Oliver Cromm
Your answer to my question is on the wrong level, since it only
refers to one, the currently most standard meaning of the word,
while the question arises from variations between regional usages
in German.
You didn't ask me about regional usages in German (which obviously
I would know nothing about). You asked me, "The pancakes the day is
named after in English are standard flat pancakes, though, not deep-
fried stuff?" Nothing deep-fried is a pancake.
Post by Oliver Cromm
Thing English German associated
name name custom
(standard asterisked)
Sweet #1 *pancake, *Pfannkuchen, eat on Shrove
hot cake, Eierkuchen, Tuesday (English-
flapjack, Fladen, ... speaking areas)
...
Sweet #2 *donut, *Berliner, eat on Shrove
Bismarck, Pfannkuchen, Tuesday (German-
Berlin donut, Krapfen, speaking areas)
... ...
Pancakes are not sweet. My batter recipe said nothing about sugar
or any other sweetening.

A bismark is (dialectal) a jelly donut.
Post by Oliver Cromm
Although they are different sweets, they somehow share an
associated custom, and they share one name across variants of
German. So they seem to be related, and I was wondering if they
are interchangeable in any way in English. Is "pancake" used
regionally or was it historically for any kind of donut? Or are
donuts eaten on Shrove Tuesday instead of pancakes anywhere in the
English-speaking world?
Donuts are not made in pans. They are deep-fried.
Post by Oliver Cromm
Maybe the custom was originally just to eat some kind of fried
flour product, and was later specialized differently in the
respective localities?
Pancakes are not fried. If you put oil or butter in the pan / on
the griddle you might get something like a poor attempt at a waffle.
Oliver Cromm
2014-05-21 16:40:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Oliver Cromm
German pancakes, at least at home, where a griddle is not standard
equipment, are usually prepared in a frying pan,
Frying pans take up a lot less space than griddles, but you can only
make one pancake at a time (or 2-3 very small ones).
"Griddle cake" is a dialectal equivalent of "pancake."
Post by Oliver Cromm
which would
explain the name, by the way. And at home is the place I eat most
of my pancakes - they are too easy to make to be worth paying
people to do it. People serious about crepes usually use
specialized equipment, in my experience.
You use the _outside_ (the convex side) of a crepe pan.
That's the most common one at home. Professional equipment is
straight, though, wherever I've seen it.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Oliver Cromm
Your answer to my question is on the wrong level, since it only
refers to one, the currently most standard meaning of the word,
while the question arises from variations between regional usages
in German.
You didn't ask me about regional usages in German (which obviously
I would know nothing about).
Of course not. I asked whether there is a parallel in regional (or
historical, although that was only implied) usages in English.

Besides that, I didn't "ask you". You seem to be one of those few
who have difficulty grasping, even after years of participating,
the essential nature of Usenet as a group discussion. By default
all questions are to the group. If I want to ask you,
specifically, the very question will contain your name, the
pronoun "you", or a similar hint.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
You asked me, "The pancakes the day is
named after in English are standard flat pancakes, though, not deep-
fried stuff?" Nothing deep-fried is a pancake.
Where the question shows that I know the usual definition of
pancake, so there was no need to expand on it as much as you did.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Oliver Cromm
Thing English German associated
name name custom
(standard asterisked)
Sweet #1 *pancake, *Pfannkuchen, eat on Shrove
hot cake, Eierkuchen, Tuesday (English-
flapjack, Fladen, ... speaking areas)
...
Sweet #2 *donut, *Berliner, eat on Shrove
Bismarck, Pfannkuchen, Tuesday (German-
Berlin donut, Krapfen, speaking areas)
... ...
Pancakes are not sweet. My batter recipe said nothing about sugar
or any other sweetening.
Neither does mine. I tend to see them as sweets because I almost
always add sweet toppings, but it is certainly not necessary. My
grandmother often served them with salad.

Anyway, that is not important to my question. I just didn't want
to call them "thing 1" and "thing 2".
Post by Peter T. Daniels
A bismark is (dialectal) a jelly donut.
I'm almost sure they are written with ck when so labelled here.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Oliver Cromm
Although they are different sweets, they somehow share an
associated custom, and they share one name across variants of
German. So they seem to be related, and I was wondering if they
are interchangeable in any way in English. Is "pancake" used
regionally or was it historically for any kind of donut? Or are
donuts eaten on Shrove Tuesday instead of pancakes anywhere in the
English-speaking world?
Donuts are not made in pans. They are deep-fried.
Well, German donuts are often made in pans. They are immersed
about 1/3 in fat, then turned once, hence the characteristic
stripe with no crust in the middle.

<Loading Image...>
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Oliver Cromm
Maybe the custom was originally just to eat some kind of fried
flour product, and was later specialized differently in the
respective localities?
Pancakes are not fried. If you put oil or butter in the pan / on
the griddle you might get something like a poor attempt at a waffle.
Maybe there's one more reason most of the American pancakes I had
were so unpleasantly dry (other candidates being baking powder -
which I don't use - and low egg content). I add some butter in the
pan. Originally, the reason may have been to avoid sticking. With
modern equipment, that is not really a problem, but it still
improves the taste. Since it is probably less than a tenth the
amount of fat in waffles, it does not bring them anyway near that
territory. I frequently see pictures of American-style pancakes
served with a piece of butter on top, a similar amount to what I
use when I prepare mine, so the use of butter with pancakes does
not seem to be sacrilege.

My grandmother used to use large amounts of oil, so her pancakes
were nearly deep-fried, but since it was oil, and there was no
sugar, either, the taste was very different from waffles. Plus,
the structure is different anyway.
--
The Eskimoes had fifty-two names for snow because it was important
to them, there ought to be as many for love.
-- Margaret Atwood, Surfacing, p.106
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2014-05-17 11:56:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Oliver Cromm
Post by occam
That would make the well known outlet "Dippin' Donuts". Not quite the
same ring, is it? ;-)
I have never tried dunking a donut, and I don't plan to. It never
even occurred to me that the name of the chain might refer to
dunking the donuts in a drink.
It makes one wonder what you think a donut is.
The quintessential donut, ideal for dunking, was the variety offered
by the Chock Full o'Nuts luncheonette chain.
I 've never met the luncheonette chain, but if my experience the first
time I went to China is anything to go by I wouldn't frequent it if I
did. I ran out of instant coffee and bought some called Chock Full
o'Nuts, which produced the most horrible cup of coffee I've ever had.
--
athel
Peter T. Daniels
2014-05-17 12:17:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Oliver Cromm
Post by occam
That would make the well known outlet "Dippin' Donuts". Not quite the
same ring, is it? ;-)
I have never tried dunking a donut, and I don't plan to. It never
even occurred to me that the name of the chain might refer to
dunking the donuts in a drink.
It makes one wonder what you think a donut is.
The quintessential donut, ideal for dunking, was the variety offered
by the Chock Full o'Nuts luncheonette chain.
I 've never met the luncheonette chain, but if my experience the first
time I went to China is anything to go by I wouldn't frequent it if I
did. I ran out of instant coffee and bought some called Chock Full
o'Nuts, which produced the most horrible cup of coffee I've ever had.
I don't know what may be marketed in China, but the luncheonette chain
is (sadly) long gone, presumably driven out by McDonalds and its ilk,
and the coffee is still very prominent on supermarket shelves.

We had McDonalds commercials in NYC long before we had their actual
outlets. The first one I ever saw was during the week before my
college graduation in 1972, when I went along for the ride when
a friend, a fellow graduating senior, drove someone from Ithaca
to the Syracuse airport. I don't know when they first opened in
NYC, but I don't recall them being in Chicago proper as of that
fall (White Castle was the closest to an equivalent there), even
though Ray Kroc's first store (1955) was in a nearby suburb.

Chock Full o'Nuts locations were all counter, no tables (there
may have been a handful of booths for parties of 4 or 6), with
the counters in bays, with fixed stools, and the waitress circulated
within the bays.

The limited but succulent menu comprised about half a dozen perfectly
square salad sandwiches wrapped in perfectly folded paper -- tuna,
chicken, etc., and cream cheese walnut -- which may have been 35c,
and perfectly round hamburgers, 50c. Donuts were 10c, 2 for 15c.

That was the first "fast food," competing with traditional diners
and delis, and also with the "tea rooms" like Schraffts, which
ladies who went downtown (i.e. to Midtown) to shop at the department
stores patronized for lunch.

(I was surprised, when I got my mother to drive to Philadelphia to
hear the Wanamaker's organ ca. 1966), that there was a restaurant
_in_ the Wanamaker's building, where I was introduced to shrimp
curry over rice. If there were such things in Gimbels or Saks 34th
St. or B. Altman or that horror of horrors S. Klein's On The Square
-- Union Square, that is --, we never ate at them.)
Oliver Cromm
2014-05-20 16:50:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
We had McDonalds commercials in NYC long before we had their actual
outlets. The first one I ever saw was during the week before my
college graduation in 1972, when I went along for the ride when
a friend, a fellow graduating senior, drove someone from Ithaca
to the Syracuse airport. I don't know when they first opened in
NYC, but I don't recall them being in Chicago proper as of that
fall (White Castle was the closest to an equivalent there), even
though Ray Kroc's first store (1955) was in a nearby suburb.
Find me surprised, given that they were already entering Germany
(starting 1971 in Munich).
--
The nice thing about standards is that you have so many to choose
from; furthermore, if you do not like any of them, you can just
wait for next year's model.
Andrew Tanenbaum, _Computer Networks_ (1981), p. 168.
Ross
2014-05-18 06:02:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Peter T. Daniels
The quintessential donut, ideal for dunking, was the variety offered
by the Chock Full o'Nuts luncheonette chain.
I 've never met the luncheonette chain, but if my experience the first
time I went to China is anything to go by I wouldn't frequent it if I
did. I ran out of instant coffee and bought some called Chock Full
o'Nuts, which produced the most horrible cup of coffee I've ever had.
I always wondered about that name. Turns out (thanks, Wiki)that Mr Black,
who started the company, used to sell (shelled) nuts to theater-goers
in Times Square, then opened a chain of nut stores, which in the late
1920s were converted to lunch counters -- very cheap but clean. The emphasis
on hygiene led them to create (?) the slogan "Untouched by Human Hands".
To get back to the coffee, they started marketing it in the 1950s, and it
kept going even after the luncheonettes closed. After half a century of
people like me wondering (without ever tasting the coffee), finally
in the 2000s, "to assure those with allergies to nuts, the company began adding the slogan 'NO NUTS! 100 % Coffee' to its packaging".

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chock_full_o%27Nuts
Peter Moylan
2014-05-18 08:46:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
The quintessential donut, ideal for dunking, was the variety offered
by the Chock Full o'Nuts luncheonette chain.
What's a luncheonette? Is that like a small luncheon?
--
Peter Moylan, Newcastle, NSW, Australia. http://www.pmoylan.org
For an e-mail address, see my web page.
Mark Brader
2014-05-18 09:54:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
What's a luncheonette?
Something like a diner, specializing in lunch.
Post by Peter Moylan
Is that like a small luncheon?
Un petit dejeuner. Who's Humpty Dumpty?
--
Mark Brader | "After that, he spent a long time just reading netnews.
***@vex.net | Sorry, I mean of course that he was debugging his
Toronto | terminal emulation code..." --Lars Wirzenius
CDB
2014-05-18 10:22:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mark Brader
Post by Peter Moylan
What's a luncheonette?
Something like a diner, specializing in lunch.
Post by Peter Moylan
Is that like a small luncheon?
Un petit dejeuner. Who's Humpty Dumpty?
A man of parts. What's excellence?
Jerry Friedman
2014-05-18 12:10:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by CDB
Post by Mark Brader
Post by Peter Moylan
What's a luncheonette?
Something like a diner, specializing in lunch.
Post by Peter Moylan
Is that like a small luncheon?
Un petit dejeuner. Who's Humpty Dumpty?
A man of parts. What's excellence?
A good cure rate. What's morbidity?
--
Jerry Friedman
Mark Brader
2014-05-19 05:43:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by CDB
Post by Mark Brader
Post by Peter Moylan
Is that like a small luncheon?
Un petit dejeuner. Who's Humpty Dumpty?
A man of parts. What's excellence?
A good cure rate. What's morbidity?
Going too high in the auction. What's a bridge?
--
Mark Brader | "How do you know I'm mad?" said Alice.
Toronto | "You must be," said the Cat, "or you wouldn't have
***@vex.net | come here. This is, after all, a Bridge Club."
| -- Ray Lee (after Lewis Carroll)
R H Draney
2014-05-19 06:33:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mark Brader
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by CDB
Post by Mark Brader
Post by Peter Moylan
Is that like a small luncheon?
Un petit dejeuner. Who's Humpty Dumpty?
A man of parts. What's excellence?
A good cure rate. What's morbidity?
Going too high in the auction. What's a bridge?
Eight bars in the middle...what's a pub crawl?

....r
--
Me? Sarcastic?
Yeah, right.
CDB
2014-05-19 12:23:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by R H Draney
Post by Mark Brader
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by CDB
Post by Mark Brader
Post by Peter Moylan
Is that like a small luncheon?
Un petit dejeuner. Who's Humpty Dumpty?
A man of parts. What's excellence?
A good cure rate. What's morbidity?
Going too high in the auction. What's a bridge?
Eight bars in the middle...what's a pub crawl?
A rhythmic physical activity, M'lud, in which the face is submerged at
one point of each cycle of the arms. What's a foster?
Peter T. Daniels
2014-05-18 13:39:35 UTC
Permalink
On Sunday, May 18, 2014 4:46:38 AM UTC-4, Peter Moylan wrote:

[no, he didn't]
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Peter T. Daniels
The quintessential donut, ideal for dunking, was the variety offered
by the Chock Full o'Nuts luncheonette chain.
What's a luncheonette? Is that like a small luncheon?
Only if a laundrette is a small laundry.

If you have a question for me, ask _me_.
Oliver Cromm
2014-05-20 16:49:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Peter T. Daniels
The quintessential donut, ideal for dunking, was the variety offered
by the Chock Full o'Nuts luncheonette chain.
I 've never met the luncheonette chain, but if my experience the first
time I went to China is anything to go by I wouldn't frequent it if I
did. I ran out of instant coffee and bought some called Chock Full
o'Nuts, which produced the most horrible cup of coffee I've ever had.
If my experience the first time I had coffee on a US plane was
anything to go by, I would still believe Starbucks made terrible
coffee.
--
There are two ways of constructing a software design. One way is
to make it so simple that there are obviously no deficiencies.
And the other way is to make it so complicated that there are no
obvious deficiencies. The first method is far more difficult.
-- C. A. R. Hoare
R H Draney
2014-05-15 21:13:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by Oliver Cromm
Post by occam
I don't agree: "dunk" is an American term for what in England was called
"dip" WIWAL (maybe no longer in the Americanized present) and goes
better with the American word "cookie".
That would make the well known outlet "Dippin' Donuts". Not quite the
same ring, is it? ;-)
I have never tried dunking a donut, and I don't plan to. It never
even occurred to me that the name of the chain might refer to
dunking the donuts in a drink. Maybe I associated it with
basketball, because that's where I first learned the term "dunk".
Well, I guess all that's just funny things happening in a
furriner's brain.
First time I heard of the chain, I thought it was funny that they'd name a
coffee place after the only important manufacturer of yo-yos....r
--
Me? Sarcastic?
Yeah, right.
charles
2014-05-16 07:30:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by Oliver Cromm
Post by occam
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
I don't agree: "dunk" is an American term for what in England was
called "dip" WIWAL (maybe no longer in the Americanized present) and
goes better with the American word "cookie".
That would make the well known outlet "Dippin' Donuts". Not quite the
same ring, is it? ;-)
I have never tried dunking a donut, and I don't plan to. It never
even occurred to me that the name of the chain might refer to
dunking the donuts in a drink. Maybe I associated it with
basketball, because that's where I first learned the term "dunk".
I have never thought that they were dunked in drink. Something liquid, like
honey or molten chocolate, is more likely.
--
From KT24

Using a RISC OS computer running v5.18
Oliver Cromm
2014-05-16 16:43:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by charles
Post by Oliver Cromm
Post by occam
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
I don't agree: "dunk" is an American term for what in England was
called "dip" WIWAL (maybe no longer in the Americanized present) and
goes better with the American word "cookie".
That would make the well known outlet "Dippin' Donuts". Not quite the
same ring, is it? ;-)
I have never tried dunking a donut, and I don't plan to. It never
even occurred to me that the name of the chain might refer to
dunking the donuts in a drink. Maybe I associated it with
basketball, because that's where I first learned the term "dunk".
I have never thought that they were dunked in drink. Something liquid, like
honey or molten chocolate, is more likely.
Now we're getting back on subject - is that dunking? Aren't these
substances (much like) a "dip"?
--
Who would know aught of art must learn and then take his ease.
s***@gmail.com
2014-05-16 18:51:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by charles
Post by Oliver Cromm
I have never tried dunking a donut, and I don't plan to. It never
even occurred to me that the name of the chain might refer to
dunking the donuts in a drink. Maybe I associated it with
basketball, because that's where I first learned the term "dunk".
I have never thought that they were dunked in drink. Something liquid, like
honey or molten chocolate, is more likely.
In that sense, donuts are glazed or frosted (the molten chocolate is applied from
above, for instance).

But in the sense of "dunkin' donuts", the archetypical image is of police
ossifers sitting in the donut shop late at night, usually at the counter,
with a mug of coffee ... dipping their donuts in the coffee.

Cake donuts, which Tony references, are usually the low-priced entry at such
places, but also can clog the mouth because they are relatively dry.
Dunkin' relieves that source of stress.

The next most common donut seems to be the cake donut with powdered sugar,
which are pretty much as dry. But the powdered sugar may float in your coffee.

The chocolate glazed probably ranks third, because the glaze bumped the price
up. Nowadays, of course, they just raise the price of everything to same level,
except for a few items like fritters.

My choice is glazed old-fashioned and a maple bar. At Krispy Kreme, I go for
glazed sour cream and a glazed original.

/dps "health food"
John E. Davis
2014-05-14 23:03:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by William
That would be "dunking". Only, it's a biscuit not a cookie.
I was looking for the name of the process where the goal is to
saturate the biscuit to the point just before it would fall apart.
None of the definitions for "dunk" that I have seen mention anything
about this finer point. Perhaps "optimal-dunking" is a better
description.

Thanks,
--John
Mike Barnes
2014-05-15 07:07:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by John E. Davis
Post by William
That would be "dunking". Only, it's a biscuit not a cookie.
I was looking for the name of the process where the goal is to
saturate the biscuit to the point just before it would fall apart.
None of the definitions for "dunk" that I have seen mention anything
about this finer point.
Although not a dunker, I'd say that taking the biscuit out before it
falls apart is an essential feature of dunking, not a "finer point".
--
Mike Barnes
Cheshire, England
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2014-05-15 10:28:47 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 14 May 2014 23:03:30 +0000 (UTC), "John E. Davis"
Post by John E. Davis
Post by William
That would be "dunking". Only, it's a biscuit not a cookie.
I was looking for the name of the process where the goal is to
saturate the biscuit to the point just before it would fall apart.
None of the definitions for "dunk" that I have seen mention anything
about this finer point. Perhaps "optimal-dunking" is a better
description.
Optimal Careful Dunking (OCD) perhaps?
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Derek Turner
1970-01-01 00:00:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by John E. Davis
Hi,
I am under the impression that there is an English word for the
process or game of dunking a cookie (biscuit) into a liquid (coffee or
tea) to saturate the cookie with the liquid but not so much that the
cookie falls apart. What is the word for this process, assuming that
one exists?
Thanks,
--John
That would be 'the biscuit game'. Next time you are with a group
of English male friends, suggest playing it.
--
----Android NewsGroup Reader----
http://www.piaohong.tk/newsgroup
Jerry Friedman
2014-05-14 03:56:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by Derek Turner
Post by John E. Davis
Hi,
I am under the impression that there is an English word for the
process or game of dunking a cookie (biscuit) into a liquid (coffee or
tea) to saturate the cookie with the liquid but not so much that the
cookie falls apart. What is the word for this process, assuming that
one exists?
Thanks,
--John
That would be 'the biscuit game'. Next time you are with a group
of English male friends, suggest playing it.
Well, at least I learned why there's a band called Limp Bizkit.
--
Jerry Friedman
Tony Cooper
2014-05-14 04:14:35 UTC
Permalink
On Tue, 13 May 2014 21:56:41 -0600, Jerry Friedman
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Derek Turner
Post by John E. Davis
Hi,
I am under the impression that there is an English word for the
process or game of dunking a cookie (biscuit) into a liquid (coffee or
tea) to saturate the cookie with the liquid but not so much that the
cookie falls apart. What is the word for this process, assuming that
one exists?
Thanks,
--John
That would be 'the biscuit game'. Next time you are with a group
of English male friends, suggest playing it.
Well, at least I learned why there's a band called Limp Bizkit.
Some of the members of Limp Bizkit, including Fred Durst and Wes
Borland, attended my daughter's wedding reception. Fred's wedding
gift to my daughter and her husband was use of a limo for the weekend.
Those were the only two I was introduced to, but there were some other
musicians there that may have been band members.

The group started in Jacksonville, Florida, and my son-in-law knew
Fred and Wes.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando FL
Guy Barry
2014-05-14 07:11:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by John E. Davis
Hi,
I am under the impression that there is an English word for the
process or game of dunking a cookie (biscuit) into a liquid (coffee or
tea) to saturate the cookie with the liquid but not so much that the
cookie falls apart. What is the word for this process, assuming that
one exists?
You've already mentioned it - "dunking".
--
Guy Barry
Steve Hayes
2014-05-14 11:53:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by John E. Davis
Hi,
I am under the impression that there is an English word for the
process or game of dunking a cookie (biscuit) into a liquid (coffee or
tea) to saturate the cookie with the liquid but not so much that the
cookie falls apart. What is the word for this process, assuming that
one exists?
You guessed it - dunking.
--
Steve Hayes from Tshwane, South Africa
Web: http://www.khanya.org.za/stevesig.htm
Blog: http://khanya.wordpress.com
E-mail - see web page, or parse: shayes at dunelm full stop org full stop uk
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