Discussion:
where vs. in which
(too old to reply)
l***@yahoo.com
2018-10-09 14:03:06 UTC
Permalink
Hello,
Please help me with the following question. Thank you very much!

His first success came with the Montgomery Bus Boycott, in which he led people to fight against the city's segregated bus policy.

In the above sentence, I would like to know if I can replace "in which" with "where". Thank you very much!
Madrigal Gurneyhalt
2018-10-09 14:31:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by l***@yahoo.com
Hello,
Please help me with the following question. Thank you very much!
His first success came with the Montgomery Bus Boycott, in which he led people to fight against the city's segregated bus policy.
In the above sentence, I would like to know if I can replace "in which" with "where". Thank you very much!
You can but if this is meant for 'proper' writing then you shouldn't.
Horace LaBadie
2018-10-09 15:02:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by l***@yahoo.com
Hello,
Please help me with the following question. Thank you very much!
His first success came with the Montgomery Bus Boycott, in which he led
people to fight against the city's segregated bus policy.
In the above sentence, I would like to know if I can replace "in which"
with "where". Thank you very much!
It depends on whether you want to refer to the place, Montgomery, where
the boycott took place, or to the boycott itself in which he
participated.
Madrigal Gurneyhalt
2018-10-09 15:33:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by l***@yahoo.com
Hello,
Please help me with the following question. Thank you very much!
His first success came with the Montgomery Bus Boycott, in which he led
people to fight against the city's segregated bus policy.
In the above sentence, I would like to know if I can replace "in which"
with "where". Thank you very much!
It depends on whether you want to refer to the place, Montgomery, where
the boycott took place, or to the boycott itself in which he
participated.
Nah, nah, nah. For that option you'd need "the Bus Boycott in
Montgomery". The Montgomery Bus Boycott is an event, not a place.
Harrison Hill
2018-10-09 17:32:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by l***@yahoo.com
Hello,
Please help me with the following question. Thank you very much!
His first success came with the Montgomery Bus Boycott, in which he led people to fight against the city's segregated bus policy.
In the above sentence, I would like to know if I can replace "in which" with "where". Thank you very much!
Yes of course you can. The Montgomery Bus Boycott is unlikely to
have taken in any other city, so the two phrases are synonyms.
Peter T. Daniels
2018-10-09 17:41:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by Harrison Hill
Post by l***@yahoo.com
Please help me with the following question. Thank you very much!
His first success came with the Montgomery Bus Boycott, in which he led people to fight against the city's segregated bus policy.
In the above sentence, I would like to know if I can replace "in which" with "where". Thank you very much!
Yes of course you can. The Montgomery Bus Boycott is unlikely to
have taken in any other city, so the two phrases are synonyms.
One of them, however, is ungrammatical in a grammar of Formal Standard
English. A locative cannot resume an event, only a location.
David Kleinecke
2018-10-09 18:17:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Harrison Hill
Post by l***@yahoo.com
Please help me with the following question. Thank you very much!
His first success came with the Montgomery Bus Boycott, in which he led people to fight against the city's segregated bus policy.
In the above sentence, I would like to know if I can replace "in which" with "where". Thank you very much!
Yes of course you can. The Montgomery Bus Boycott is unlikely to
have taken in any other city, so the two phrases are synonyms.
One of them, however, is ungrammatical in a grammar of Formal Standard
English. A locative cannot resume an event, only a location.
I don't think Formal Standard English is a thing - that is,
no such standard exists.

I would have written "when".
Peter T. Daniels
2018-10-09 21:34:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by David Kleinecke
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Harrison Hill
Post by l***@yahoo.com
Please help me with the following question. Thank you very much!
His first success came with the Montgomery Bus Boycott, in which he led people to fight against the city's segregated bus policy.
In the above sentence, I would like to know if I can replace "in which" with "where". Thank you very much!
Yes of course you can. The Montgomery Bus Boycott is unlikely to
have taken in any other city, so the two phrases are synonyms.
One of them, however, is ungrammatical in a grammar of Formal Standard
English. A locative cannot resume an event, only a location.
I don't think Formal Standard English is a thing - that is,
no such standard exists.
It's what Chomsky describes. (Among others.) David Stampe's "natural
phonology," which dealt with English as she is spoke, unfortunately
went nowhere.
Post by David Kleinecke
I would have written "when".
David Kleinecke
2018-10-09 22:04:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by David Kleinecke
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Harrison Hill
Post by l***@yahoo.com
Please help me with the following question. Thank you very much!
His first success came with the Montgomery Bus Boycott, in which he led people to fight against the city's segregated bus policy.
In the above sentence, I would like to know if I can replace "in which" with "where". Thank you very much!
Yes of course you can. The Montgomery Bus Boycott is unlikely to
have taken in any other city, so the two phrases are synonyms.
One of them, however, is ungrammatical in a grammar of Formal Standard
English. A locative cannot resume an event, only a location.
I don't think Formal Standard English is a thing - that is,
no such standard exists.
It's what Chomsky describes. (Among others.) David Stampe's "natural
phonology," which dealt with English as she is spoke, unfortunately
went nowhere.
I think AUE proves - daily - that there is no STANDARD
English - formal or otherwise.
Peter T. Daniels
2018-10-10 03:13:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by David Kleinecke
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by David Kleinecke
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Harrison Hill
Post by l***@yahoo.com
Please help me with the following question. Thank you very much!
His first success came with the Montgomery Bus Boycott, in which he led people to fight against the city's segregated bus policy.
In the above sentence, I would like to know if I can replace "in which" with "where". Thank you very much!
Yes of course you can. The Montgomery Bus Boycott is unlikely to
have taken in any other city, so the two phrases are synonyms.
One of them, however, is ungrammatical in a grammar of Formal Standard
English. A locative cannot resume an event, only a location.
I don't think Formal Standard English is a thing - that is,
no such standard exists.
It's what Chomsky describes. (Among others.) David Stampe's "natural
phonology," which dealt with English as she is spoke, unfortunately
went nowhere.
I think AUE proves - daily - that there is no STANDARD
English - formal or otherwise.
Then what is it that Chomsky (and others) assign(s) structures to? What
is it that prescriptivists prescribe?
David Kleinecke
2018-10-10 18:50:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by David Kleinecke
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by David Kleinecke
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Harrison Hill
Post by l***@yahoo.com
Please help me with the following question. Thank you very much!
His first success came with the Montgomery Bus Boycott, in which he led people to fight against the city's segregated bus policy.
In the above sentence, I would like to know if I can replace "in which" with "where". Thank you very much!
Yes of course you can. The Montgomery Bus Boycott is unlikely to
have taken in any other city, so the two phrases are synonyms.
One of them, however, is ungrammatical in a grammar of Formal Standard
English. A locative cannot resume an event, only a location.
I don't think Formal Standard English is a thing - that is,
no such standard exists.
It's what Chomsky describes. (Among others.) David Stampe's "natural
phonology," which dealt with English as she is spoke, unfortunately
went nowhere.
I think AUE proves - daily - that there is no STANDARD
English - formal or otherwise.
Then what is it that Chomsky (and others) assign(s) structures to? What
is it that prescriptivists prescribe?
I doubt that Chomsky's linguistic competence and the
prescriptivists' ideal have much in common apart from
both being unicorns.

That is, they refer to non-existent entities.

One could say there was a lot of that going around.

Such existence as these things have is as little
nuggets in their imaginer's heads.

Computer science abounds in real standards. I am, for
my sins, very familiar with the standard for the C
computer language. Nothing - not even 1000 page
grammars - like that exist for natural language.

Athel Cornish-Bowden
2018-10-09 21:03:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Harrison Hill
Post by l***@yahoo.com
Please help me with the following question. Thank you very much!
His first success came with the Montgomery Bus Boycott, in which he led
people to fight against the city's segregated bus policy.
In the above sentence, I would like to know if I can replace "in which"
with "where". Thank you very much!
Yes of course you can. The Montgomery Bus Boycott is unlikely to
have taken in any other city, so the two phrases are synonyms.
One of them, however, is ungrammatical in a grammar of Formal Standard
English. A locative cannot resume an event, only a location.
I think you need to rephrase that in words that 'Arrison can
understand. You are, of course, right, and he is talking nonsense as
usual.
--
athel
Peter T. Daniels
2018-10-09 21:35:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Harrison Hill
Post by l***@yahoo.com
Please help me with the following question. Thank you very much!
His first success came with the Montgomery Bus Boycott, in which he led
people to fight against the city's segregated bus policy.
In the above sentence, I would like to know if I can replace "in which"
with "where". Thank you very much!
Yes of course you can. The Montgomery Bus Boycott is unlikely to
have taken in any other city, so the two phrases are synonyms.
One of them, however, is ungrammatical in a grammar of Formal Standard
English. A locative cannot resume an event, only a location.
I think you need to rephrase that in words that 'Arrison can
understand. You are, of course, right, and he is talking nonsense as
usual.
Oh, go on, be my interpreter! You have this rapport with 'im.
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