Discussion:
OT: 78rpm and the jive
(too old to reply)
Spains Harden
2019-11-27 15:43:44 UTC
Permalink
We used to go to the International Dance Competition at the Albert
Hall in London - we got free tickets. Over 10 years or so I noticed
that although the various dance-styles were danced to various
"standards", there was only ever one choice for the jive. Before
you click it: what is the only jive the professional dancers
consider jively enough?



More jives please. Or anything else you can find that is good, being
played on a 78rpm turntable. If you can find any Lindy Bop then more
power to your elbow.
Spains Harden
2019-11-27 19:57:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by Spains Harden
We used to go to the International Dance Competition at the Albert
Hall in London - we got free tickets. Over 10 years or so I noticed
that although the various dance-styles were danced to various
"standards", there was only ever one choice for the jive. Before
you click it: what is the only jive the professional dancers
consider jively enough?
http://youtu.be/aJxoRIjyNlw
More jives please. Or anything else you can find that is good, being
played on a 78rpm turntable. If you can find any Lindy Bop then more
power to your elbow.
ObAUE: "A can of ale" in AmE.
Peter T. Daniels
2019-11-27 20:11:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by Spains Harden
Post by Spains Harden
We used to go to the International Dance Competition at the Albert
Hall in London - we got free tickets. Over 10 years or so I noticed
that although the various dance-styles were danced to various
"standards", there was only ever one choice for the jive. Before
you click it: what is the only jive the professional dancers
consider jively enough?
http://youtu.be/aJxoRIjyNlw
More jives please. Or anything else you can find that is good, being
played on a 78rpm turntable. If you can find any Lindy Bop then more
power to your elbow.
ObAUE: "A can of ale" in AmE.
What does 'Arrison think "a can of ale" is AmE for, given that ale itself
is all but alien to AmE?
Spains Harden
2019-11-27 20:48:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Spains Harden
Post by Spains Harden
We used to go to the International Dance Competition at the Albert
Hall in London - we got free tickets. Over 10 years or so I noticed
that although the various dance-styles were danced to various
"standards", there was only ever one choice for the jive. Before
you click it: what is the only jive the professional dancers
consider jively enough?
http://youtu.be/aJxoRIjyNlw
More jives please. Or anything else you can find that is good, being
played on a 78rpm turntable. If you can find any Lindy Bop then more
power to your elbow.
ObAUE: "A can of ale" in AmE.
What does 'Arrison think "a can of ale" is AmE for, given that ale itself
is all but alien to AmE?
One of the best known AmE songs has it at 1 minute or so into it?

I know you don't do links so you can rejoice in your ignorance.

http://youtu.be/aJxoRIjyNlw
Peter T. Daniels
2019-11-27 21:36:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by Spains Harden
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Spains Harden
Post by Spains Harden
More jives please. Or anything else you can find that is good, being
played on a 78rpm turntable. If you can find any Lindy Bop then more
power to your elbow.
ObAUE: "A can of ale" in AmE.
What does 'Arrison think "a can of ale" is AmE for, given that ale itself
is all but alien to AmE?
One of the best known AmE songs has it at 1 minute or so into it?
I know you don't do links so you can rejoice in your ignorance.
http://youtu.be/aJxoRIjyNlw
"BEST KNOWN"???? TO WHOM?

Why do you have "jive" on the brain?

And you did not answer the question. Why did you write "a can of ale
in AmE"?
Spains Harden
2019-11-28 15:45:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Spains Harden
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Spains Harden
Post by Spains Harden
More jives please. Or anything else you can find that is good, being
played on a 78rpm turntable. If you can find any Lindy Bop then more
power to your elbow.
ObAUE: "A can of ale" in AmE.
What does 'Arrison think "a can of ale" is AmE for, given that ale itself
is all but alien to AmE?
One of the best known AmE songs has it at 1 minute or so into it?
I know you don't do links so you can rejoice in your ignorance.
http://youtu.be/aJxoRIjyNlw
"BEST KNOWN"???? TO WHOM?
Why do you have "jive" on the brain?
And you did not answer the question. Why did you write "a can of ale
in AmE"?
1) Louis Prima was a New Orleans American.
2) His best known song features the line: "Papa's in the icebox lookin'
for a can of ale".
Tony Cooper
2019-11-28 16:42:42 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 28 Nov 2019 07:45:34 -0800 (PST), Spains Harden
Post by Spains Harden
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Spains Harden
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Spains Harden
Post by Spains Harden
More jives please. Or anything else you can find that is good, being
played on a 78rpm turntable. If you can find any Lindy Bop then more
power to your elbow.
ObAUE: "A can of ale" in AmE.
What does 'Arrison think "a can of ale" is AmE for, given that ale itself
is all but alien to AmE?
One of the best known AmE songs has it at 1 minute or so into it?
I know you don't do links so you can rejoice in your ignorance.
http://youtu.be/aJxoRIjyNlw
"BEST KNOWN"???? TO WHOM?
Why do you have "jive" on the brain?
And you did not answer the question. Why did you write "a can of ale
in AmE"?
1) Louis Prima was a New Orleans American.
2) His best known song features the line: "Papa's in the icebox lookin'
for a can of ale".
Dunno about that claim that "Jump, Jive An' Wail is his "best known
song". To you, perhaps, but I don't think than any one song is known
as his signature song. He's best known for his style, his association
with Keely Smith (and his disassociation with Keely Smith), but not
for one particular song.

The term "ale" is used in the US, but it is overshadowed by the use of
"beer". I think "ale" was chosen in those lyrics simply because it
rhymed with "wail".

The use of "ale" in a name is seeing a resurgence in the US because of
the increased presence of "craft beers". We have some "Fat Tire"
(brand) "Belgian White Ale" in the fridge as I write this.

Many products on the shelves in a liquor store here have "IPA" on the
label, and that's "India Pale Ale".

We go to the store to buy some beer, and that product may have "ale"
in the name, but we come home with "beer".
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Spains Harden
2019-11-28 18:01:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tony Cooper
On Thu, 28 Nov 2019 07:45:34 -0800 (PST), Spains Harden
Post by Spains Harden
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Spains Harden
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Spains Harden
Post by Spains Harden
More jives please. Or anything else you can find that is good, being
played on a 78rpm turntable. If you can find any Lindy Bop then more
power to your elbow.
ObAUE: "A can of ale" in AmE.
What does 'Arrison think "a can of ale" is AmE for, given that ale itself
is all but alien to AmE?
One of the best known AmE songs has it at 1 minute or so into it?
I know you don't do links so you can rejoice in your ignorance.
http://youtu.be/aJxoRIjyNlw
"BEST KNOWN"???? TO WHOM?
Why do you have "jive" on the brain?
And you did not answer the question. Why did you write "a can of ale
in AmE"?
1) Louis Prima was a New Orleans American.
2) His best known song features the line: "Papa's in the icebox lookin'
for a can of ale".
Dunno about that claim that "Jump, Jive An' Wail is his "best known
song". To you, perhaps, but I don't think than any one song is known
as his signature song. He's best known for his style, his association
with Keely Smith (and his disassociation with Keely Smith), but not
for one particular song.
The term "ale" is used in the US, but it is overshadowed by the use of
"beer". I think "ale" was chosen in those lyrics simply because it
rhymed with "wail".
The use of "ale" in a name is seeing a resurgence in the US because of
the increased presence of "craft beers". We have some "Fat Tire"
(brand) "Belgian White Ale" in the fridge as I write this.
Many products on the shelves in a liquor store here have "IPA" on the
label, and that's "India Pale Ale".
We go to the store to buy some beer, and that product may have "ale"
in the name, but we come home with "beer".
I don't recall beer having any name at all when we used to slip
over the border to buy it on the NC border - Schlitz, Bud, Country
Club? We could get Georgia moonshine but that was not desirable.

We have plenty of American craft beers nowadays here in London.
American IPA is normal in a Wetherspoons pub.
Katy Jennison
2019-11-28 19:33:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by Spains Harden
Post by Tony Cooper
Many products on the shelves in a liquor store here have "IPA" on the
label, and that's "India Pale Ale".
We go to the store to buy some beer, and that product may have "ale"
in the name, but we come home with "beer".
I don't recall beer having any name at all when we used to slip
over the border to buy it on the NC border - Schlitz, Bud, Country
Club? We could get Georgia moonshine but that was not desirable.
We have plenty of American craft beers nowadays here in London.
American IPA is normal in a Wetherspoons pub.
'American IPA' is a style - the ones we get in the UK don't necessarily
come from actual America.
--
Katy Jennison
Spains Harden
2019-11-28 19:43:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by Katy Jennison
Post by Spains Harden
Post by Tony Cooper
Many products on the shelves in a liquor store here have "IPA" on the
label, and that's "India Pale Ale".
We go to the store to buy some beer, and that product may have "ale"
in the name, but we come home with "beer".
I don't recall beer having any name at all when we used to slip
over the border to buy it on the NC border - Schlitz, Bud, Country
Club? We could get Georgia moonshine but that was not desirable.
We have plenty of American craft beers nowadays here in London.
American IPA is normal in a Wetherspoons pub.
'American IPA' is a style - the ones we get in the UK don't necessarily
come from actual America.
No they don't get got from actual America (to irritate my dead
mother), because Wetherspoons invite International brewers to
come to Britain to use British breweries - to brew their own beers.

American IPA may be a "a style" in your neck of the woods.
Jerry Friedman
2019-11-28 18:37:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tony Cooper
On Thu, 28 Nov 2019 07:45:34 -0800 (PST), Spains Harden
...
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Spains Harden
Post by Peter T. Daniels
And you did not answer the question. Why did you write "a can of ale
in AmE"?
1) Louis Prima was a New Orleans American.
2) His best known song features the line: "Papa's in the icebox lookin'
for a can of ale".
Dunno about that claim that "Jump, Jive An' Wail is his "best known
song". To you, perhaps, but I don't think than any one song is known
as his signature song. He's best known for his style, his association
with Keely Smith (and his disassociation with Keely Smith), but not
for one particular song.
...
All I associated his name with was self-mocking Italian-stereotype
songs. However, I see he played the orangutan King Louie in the first
Disney /Jungle Book/ movie and sang the song "I Wanna Be Like You".
That's undoubtedly his best-known song by a large factor--but not
necessarily in connection with his name.

I'd have written "dissociation from" instead of "disassociation with".
--
Jerry Friedman
Tony Cooper
2019-11-28 18:49:50 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 28 Nov 2019 11:37:30 -0700, Jerry Friedman
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Tony Cooper
On Thu, 28 Nov 2019 07:45:34 -0800 (PST), Spains Harden
...
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Spains Harden
Post by Peter T. Daniels
And you did not answer the question. Why did you write "a can of ale
in AmE"?
1) Louis Prima was a New Orleans American.
2) His best known song features the line: "Papa's in the icebox lookin'
for a can of ale".
Dunno about that claim that "Jump, Jive An' Wail is his "best known
song". To you, perhaps, but I don't think than any one song is known
as his signature song. He's best known for his style, his association
with Keely Smith (and his disassociation with Keely Smith), but not
for one particular song.
...
All I associated his name with was self-mocking Italian-stereotype
songs. However, I see he played the orangutan King Louie in the first
Disney /Jungle Book/ movie and sang the song "I Wanna Be Like You".
That's undoubtedly his best-known song by a large factor--but not
necessarily in connection with his name.
I'd have written "dissociation from" instead of "disassociation with".
A fair point, but I could go either way. Prima not only disassociated
himself from Keely, but the split was very acrimonious and he was very
vocal about not needing her (musically) and that she wasn't that good.
The "with" aspect is that they were no longer a pair.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Ross
2019-11-28 19:44:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Tony Cooper
On Thu, 28 Nov 2019 07:45:34 -0800 (PST), Spains Harden
...
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Spains Harden
Post by Peter T. Daniels
And you did not answer the question. Why did you write "a can of ale
in AmE"?
1) Louis Prima was a New Orleans American.
2) His best known song features the line: "Papa's in the icebox lookin'
for a can of ale".
Dunno about that claim that "Jump, Jive An' Wail is his "best known
song". To you, perhaps, but I don't think than any one song is known
as his signature song. He's best known for his style, his association
with Keely Smith (and his disassociation with Keely Smith), but not
for one particular song.
...
All I associated his name with was self-mocking Italian-stereotype
songs. However, I see he played the orangutan King Louie in the first
Disney /Jungle Book/ movie and sang the song "I Wanna Be Like You".
That's undoubtedly his best-known song by a large factor--but not
necessarily in connection with his name.
I knew of him (and Keely) only from "That Old Black
Magic", which was a big enough hit in 1958 that it
was on the radio even in Canada. Only years later did I begin to get some sense of his total oeuvre.
Peter Moylan
2019-11-29 00:55:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tony Cooper
Many products on the shelves in a liquor store here have "IPA" on
the label, and that's "India Pale Ale".
The reputation of IPA has been damaged in Australia by the Institute of
Public Affairs, a far-right think tank whose goal is to direct Liberal
Party policy and protect the interests of the very rich.

The beer company can't afford to sue, because the other IPA is
bankrolled by some of the richest people in the country, including
Rupert Murdoch who controls most of the press in Australia.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Peter T. Daniels
2019-11-28 20:37:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by Spains Harden
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Spains Harden
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Spains Harden
Post by Spains Harden
More jives please. Or anything else you can find that is good, being
played on a 78rpm turntable. If you can find any Lindy Bop then more
power to your elbow.
ObAUE: "A can of ale" in AmE.
What does 'Arrison think "a can of ale" is AmE for, given that ale itself
is all but alien to AmE?
One of the best known AmE songs has it at 1 minute or so into it?
I know you don't do links so you can rejoice in your ignorance.
http://youtu.be/aJxoRIjyNlw
"BEST KNOWN"???? TO WHOM?
Why do you have "jive" on the brain?
And you did not answer the question. Why did you write "a can of ale
in AmE"?
1) Louis Prima was a New Orleans American.
2) His best known song features the line: "Papa's in the icebox lookin'
for a can of ale".
Neither of those makes it "One of the best known AmE songs." I have
vaguely heard of Louis Prima, I have never heard of that song ("Jump,
Jive, and Wail"), and it isn't even mentioned in his Wikiparticle. The
only songs named there that I do know of are "Sing, Sing, Sing" (from
its later cover by Benny Goodman) and "That Old Black Magic."
Spains Harden
2019-11-28 20:42:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Spains Harden
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Spains Harden
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Spains Harden
Post by Spains Harden
More jives please. Or anything else you can find that is good, being
played on a 78rpm turntable. If you can find any Lindy Bop then more
power to your elbow.
ObAUE: "A can of ale" in AmE.
What does 'Arrison think "a can of ale" is AmE for, given that ale itself
is all but alien to AmE?
One of the best known AmE songs has it at 1 minute or so into it?
I know you don't do links so you can rejoice in your ignorance.
http://youtu.be/aJxoRIjyNlw
"BEST KNOWN"???? TO WHOM?
Why do you have "jive" on the brain?
And you did not answer the question. Why did you write "a can of ale
in AmE"?
1) Louis Prima was a New Orleans American.
2) His best known song features the line: "Papa's in the icebox lookin'
for a can of ale".
Neither of those makes it "One of the best known AmE songs." I have
vaguely heard of Louis Prima, I have never heard of that song ("Jump,
Jive, and Wail"), and it isn't even mentioned in his Wikiparticle. The
only songs named there that I do know of are "Sing, Sing, Sing" (from
its later cover by Benny Goodman) and "That Old Black Magic."
This is what happens when you become willfully ignorant. He is
one of Walt Disney's biggest stars. Not that you will ever know.
Peter T. Daniels
2019-11-28 21:03:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by Spains Harden
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Spains Harden
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Spains Harden
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Spains Harden
Post by Spains Harden
More jives please. Or anything else you can find that is good, being
played on a 78rpm turntable. If you can find any Lindy Bop then more
power to your elbow.
ObAUE: "A can of ale" in AmE.
What does 'Arrison think "a can of ale" is AmE for, given that ale itself
is all but alien to AmE?
One of the best known AmE songs has it at 1 minute or so into it?
I know you don't do links so you can rejoice in your ignorance.
http://youtu.be/aJxoRIjyNlw
"BEST KNOWN"???? TO WHOM?
Why do you have "jive" on the brain?
And you did not answer the question. Why did you write "a can of ale
in AmE"?
1) Louis Prima was a New Orleans American.
2) His best known song features the line: "Papa's in the icebox lookin'
for a can of ale".
Neither of those makes it "One of the best known AmE songs." I have
vaguely heard of Louis Prima, I have never heard of that song ("Jump,
Jive, and Wail"), and it isn't even mentioned in his Wikiparticle. The
only songs named there that I do know of are "Sing, Sing, Sing" (from
its later cover by Benny Goodman) and "That Old Black Magic."
This is what happens when you become willfully ignorant. He is
one of Walt Disney's biggest stars. Not that you will ever know.
Sorry, but voicing a character in one or two second-tier animated features
(neither of which I've heard of, so they weren't promoted either on the
ABC network or on wherever such was done in the 1970s), near the end of
one's life, doesn't make one "one of Walt Disney's biggest stars." It was
only fairly recently that known actors(/singers) began to be used for
voice-overs in such movies -- could *Toy Story* have been the first, using
Tim Allen and Tom Hanks as a gimmick? -- and they weren't identified even
in the publicity materials (let alone on screen). No one knew who sang
"When You Wish Upon a Star" from *Pinocchio*, which may be the biggest-ever
Disney animated feature song; guesses that it was Jack Benny's Dennis Day
were denied. (I don't count box-office receipts for popularity. I highly
doubt that more people have seen *Titanic* or *Avatar* than have seen
*Gone with the Wind* or *Casablanca*.)

Recently Disney began using distinctive voices -- most notably Angela
Lansbury in *Beauty and the Beast*, and now of course Edina Menzel
in *Frozen*; but Dame Angela didn't give up her career to do Disney
songs ever after, whereas Edina seems to have done little else, even
after her Tony-winning (and -deserving) performance in *Wicked*, the
only good thing about the show (including Kristin Chenoweth), which
I don't understand how is still running after all these years.
Spains Harden
2019-11-28 21:18:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Spains Harden
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Spains Harden
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Spains Harden
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Spains Harden
Post by Spains Harden
More jives please. Or anything else you can find that is good, being
played on a 78rpm turntable. If you can find any Lindy Bop then more
power to your elbow.
ObAUE: "A can of ale" in AmE.
What does 'Arrison think "a can of ale" is AmE for, given that ale itself
is all but alien to AmE?
One of the best known AmE songs has it at 1 minute or so into it?
I know you don't do links so you can rejoice in your ignorance.
http://youtu.be/aJxoRIjyNlw
"BEST KNOWN"???? TO WHOM?
Why do you have "jive" on the brain?
And you did not answer the question. Why did you write "a can of ale
in AmE"?
1) Louis Prima was a New Orleans American.
2) His best known song features the line: "Papa's in the icebox lookin'
for a can of ale".
Neither of those makes it "One of the best known AmE songs." I have
vaguely heard of Louis Prima, I have never heard of that song ("Jump,
Jive, and Wail"), and it isn't even mentioned in his Wikiparticle. The
only songs named there that I do know of are "Sing, Sing, Sing" (from
its later cover by Benny Goodman) and "That Old Black Magic."
This is what happens when you become willfully ignorant. He is
one of Walt Disney's biggest stars. Not that you will ever know.
Sorry, but voicing a character in one or two second-tier animated features
(neither of which I've heard of, so they weren't promoted either on the
ABC network or on wherever such was done in the 1970s), near the end of
one's life, doesn't make one "one of Walt Disney's biggest stars." It was
only fairly recently that known actors(/singers) began to be used for
voice-overs in such movies -- could *Toy Story* have been the first, using
Tim Allen and Tom Hanks as a gimmick? -- and they weren't identified even
in the publicity materials (let alone on screen). No one knew who sang
"When You Wish Upon a Star" from *Pinocchio*, which may be the biggest-ever
Disney animated feature song; guesses that it was Jack Benny's Dennis Day
were denied. (I don't count box-office receipts for popularity. I highly
doubt that more people have seen *Titanic* or *Avatar* than have seen
*Gone with the Wind* or *Casablanca*.)
Recently Disney began using distinctive voices -- most notably Angela
Lansbury in *Beauty and the Beast*, and now of course Edina Menzel
in *Frozen*; but Dame Angela didn't give up her career to do Disney
songs ever after, whereas Edina seems to have done little else, even
after her Tony-winning (and -deserving) performance in *Wicked*, the
only good thing about the show (including Kristin Chenoweth), which
I don't understand how is still running after all these years.
I'm sorry and anything I wrote here was meant to be in the
spirit of friendship. This is hopefully a good link:


Peter T. Daniels
2019-11-28 21:23:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by Spains Harden
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Spains Harden
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Spains Harden
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Spains Harden
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Spains Harden
Post by Spains Harden
More jives please. Or anything else you can find that is good, being
played on a 78rpm turntable. If you can find any Lindy Bop then more
power to your elbow.
ObAUE: "A can of ale" in AmE.
What does 'Arrison think "a can of ale" is AmE for, given that ale itself
is all but alien to AmE?
One of the best known AmE songs has it at 1 minute or so into it?
I know you don't do links so you can rejoice in your ignorance.
http://youtu.be/aJxoRIjyNlw
"BEST KNOWN"???? TO WHOM?
Why do you have "jive" on the brain?
And you did not answer the question. Why did you write "a can of ale
in AmE"?
1) Louis Prima was a New Orleans American.
2) His best known song features the line: "Papa's in the icebox lookin'
for a can of ale".
Neither of those makes it "One of the best known AmE songs." I have
vaguely heard of Louis Prima, I have never heard of that song ("Jump,
Jive, and Wail"), and it isn't even mentioned in his Wikiparticle. The
only songs named there that I do know of are "Sing, Sing, Sing" (from
its later cover by Benny Goodman) and "That Old Black Magic."
This is what happens when you become willfully ignorant. He is
one of Walt Disney's biggest stars. Not that you will ever know.
Sorry, but voicing a character in one or two second-tier animated features
(neither of which I've heard of, so they weren't promoted either on the
ABC network or on wherever such was done in the 1970s), near the end of
one's life, doesn't make one "one of Walt Disney's biggest stars." It was
only fairly recently that known actors(/singers) began to be used for
voice-overs in such movies -- could *Toy Story* have been the first, using
Tim Allen and Tom Hanks as a gimmick? -- and they weren't identified even
in the publicity materials (let alone on screen). No one knew who sang
"When You Wish Upon a Star" from *Pinocchio*, which may be the biggest-ever
Disney animated feature song; guesses that it was Jack Benny's Dennis Day
were denied. (I don't count box-office receipts for popularity. I highly
doubt that more people have seen *Titanic* or *Avatar* than have seen
*Gone with the Wind* or *Casablanca*.)
Recently Disney began using distinctive voices -- most notably Angela
Lansbury in *Beauty and the Beast*, and now of course Edina Menzel
in *Frozen*; but Dame Angela didn't give up her career to do Disney
songs ever after, whereas Edina seems to have done little else, even
after her Tony-winning (and -deserving) performance in *Wicked*, the
only good thing about the show (including Kristin Chenoweth), which
I don't understand how is still running after all these years.
I'm sorry and anything I wrote here was meant to be in the
http://youtu.be/9JDzlhW3XTM
By then the voice was gone. This is certainly one of those scenes that
has probably been eliminated from future releases of the movie on the
grounds of racism.
RH Draney
2019-11-29 05:36:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Spains Harden
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Neither of those makes it "One of the best known AmE songs." I have
vaguely heard of Louis Prima, I have never heard of that song ("Jump,
Jive, and Wail"), and it isn't even mentioned in his Wikiparticle. The
only songs named there that I do know of are "Sing, Sing, Sing" (from
its later cover by Benny Goodman) and "That Old Black Magic."
Have you heard of a little number called "Just a Gigolo"?...or is that a
David Lee Roth song for you?...
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Spains Harden
This is what happens when you become willfully ignorant. He is
one of Walt Disney's biggest stars. Not that you will ever know.
Sorry, but voicing a character in one or two second-tier animated features
(neither of which I've heard of, so they weren't promoted either on the
ABC network or on wherever such was done in the 1970s), near the end of
one's life, doesn't make one "one of Walt Disney's biggest stars." It was
only fairly recently that known actors(/singers) began to be used for
voice-overs in such movies -- could *Toy Story* have been the first, using
Tim Allen and Tom Hanks as a gimmick? -- and they weren't identified even
in the publicity materials (let alone on screen). No one knew who sang
"When You Wish Upon a Star" from *Pinocchio*, which may be the biggest-ever
Disney animated feature song; guesses that it was Jack Benny's Dennis Day
were denied. (I don't count box-office receipts for popularity. I highly
doubt that more people have seen *Titanic* or *Avatar* than have seen
*Gone with the Wind* or *Casablanca*.)
Everybody knew at the time that Jiminy Cricket was voiced by Cliff
Edwards, already a popular singer at the time in his "Ukulele Ike"
persona..."The Jungle Book" is hardly second-tier in the classic Disney
canon; it holds the distinction of being the last Disney animated
feature on which Walt himself had direct involvement (the first one
after his passing was "The Aristocats", which had a better claim to
being "second-tier", for all that its voice cast included such unknowns
as Eva Gabor and the return of Phil Harris who had voiced Baloo in "The
Jungle Book")....

Before that, Disney had already used such established talents as Hans
Conried (Hook in "Peter Pan"), Ed Wynn, Jerry Colonna, Sterling Holloway
and Richard Haydn (the Mad Hatter, March Hare, Cheshire Cat and
Caterpillar respectively, in "Alice in Wonderland"), and Rod Taylor
(Pongo in "101 Dalmatians"), all actors chosen for their recognizable
voices....r
Peter T. Daniels
2019-11-29 16:36:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by RH Draney
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Spains Harden
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Neither of those makes it "One of the best known AmE songs." I have
vaguely heard of Louis Prima, I have never heard of that song ("Jump,
Jive, and Wail"), and it isn't even mentioned in his Wikiparticle. The
only songs named there that I do know of are "Sing, Sing, Sing" (from
its later cover by Benny Goodman) and "That Old Black Magic."
Have you heard of a little number called "Just a Gigolo"?...or is that a
no
Post by RH Draney
David Lee Roth song for you?...
You say that as if I should know who it is. I've heard the name but I
have no idea in what connection.
Post by RH Draney
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Spains Harden
This is what happens when you become willfully ignorant. He is
one of Walt Disney's biggest stars. Not that you will ever know.
Sorry, but voicing a character in one or two second-tier animated features
(neither of which I've heard of, so they weren't promoted either on the
ABC network or on wherever such was done in the 1970s), near the end of
one's life, doesn't make one "one of Walt Disney's biggest stars." It was
only fairly recently that known actors(/singers) began to be used for
voice-overs in such movies -- could *Toy Story* have been the first, using
Tim Allen and Tom Hanks as a gimmick? -- and they weren't identified even
in the publicity materials (let alone on screen). No one knew who sang
"When You Wish Upon a Star" from *Pinocchio*, which may be the biggest-ever
Disney animated feature song; guesses that it was Jack Benny's Dennis Day
were denied. (I don't count box-office receipts for popularity. I highly
doubt that more people have seen *Titanic* or *Avatar* than have seen
*Gone with the Wind* or *Casablanca*.)
Everybody knew at the time that Jiminy Cricket was voiced by Cliff
Edwards, already a popular singer at the time in his "Ukulele Ike"
persona..."The Jungle Book" is hardly second-tier in the classic Disney
canon; it holds the distinction of being the last Disney animated
feature on which Walt himself had direct involvement (the first one
after his passing was "The Aristocats", which had a better claim to
being "second-tier", for all that its voice cast included such unknowns
as Eva Gabor and the return of Phil Harris who had voiced Baloo in "The
Jungle Book")....
Before that, Disney had already used such established talents as Hans
Conried (Hook in "Peter Pan"), Ed Wynn, Jerry Colonna, Sterling Holloway
and Richard Haydn (the Mad Hatter, March Hare, Cheshire Cat and
Caterpillar respectively, in "Alice in Wonderland"), and Rod Taylor
(Pongo in "101 Dalmatians"), all actors chosen for their recognizable
voices....r
Ok, so Disney started using recognized actors before *Toy Story* or *Beauty
and the Beast* -- but not much more. (And please don't cite that perversion
of *Alice in Wonderland* as deserving a moment's attention.)
Quinn C
2019-11-29 18:24:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by RH Draney
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Neither of those makes it "One of the best known AmE songs." I have
vaguely heard of Louis Prima, I have never heard of that song ("Jump,
Jive, and Wail"), and it isn't even mentioned in his Wikiparticle. The
only songs named there that I do know of are "Sing, Sing, Sing" (from
its later cover by Benny Goodman) and "That Old Black Magic."
Have you heard of a little number called "Just a Gigolo"?...or is that a
David Lee Roth song for you?...
It's a German song for me.


As for "That Old Black Magic", I first heard it from Spike Jones.
--
Quinn C
My pronouns are they/them
(or other gender-neutral ones)
Peter Young
2019-11-29 19:07:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by Quinn C
Post by RH Draney
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Neither of those makes it "One of the best known AmE songs." I have
vaguely heard of Louis Prima, I have never heard of that song ("Jump,
Jive, and Wail"), and it isn't even mentioned in his Wikiparticle. The
only songs named there that I do know of are "Sing, Sing, Sing" (from
its later cover by Benny Goodman) and "That Old Black Magic."
Have you heard of a little number called "Just a Gigolo"?...or is that a
David Lee Roth song for you?...
It's a German song for me.
http://youtu.be/iGd7o9klLqY
As for "That Old Black Magic", I first heard it from Spike Jones.
Of blessed memory! The Velvet Glove, The Blue Danube, and I forget how
many others.

Peter.
--
Peter Young, (BrE, RP), Consultant Anaesthetist, 1975-2004.
(US equivalent: Certified Anesthesiologist) (AUE Hg)
Cheltenham and Gloucester, UK. Now happily retired.
http://pnyoung.orpheusweb.co.uk
Tony Cooper
2019-11-29 20:48:53 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 29 Nov 2019 13:24:40 -0500, Quinn C
Post by Quinn C
Post by RH Draney
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Neither of those makes it "One of the best known AmE songs." I have
vaguely heard of Louis Prima, I have never heard of that song ("Jump,
Jive, and Wail"), and it isn't even mentioned in his Wikiparticle. The
only songs named there that I do know of are "Sing, Sing, Sing" (from
its later cover by Benny Goodman) and "That Old Black Magic."
Have you heard of a little number called "Just a Gigolo"?...or is that a
David Lee Roth song for you?...
It's a German song for me.
http://youtu.be/iGd7o9klLqY
As for "That Old Black Magic", I first heard it from Spike Jones.
Allan Sherman made a recording of it with slightly altered lyrics:

That old back scratcher has me in its spell
That old back scratcher like the Chinese sell
Your plastic fingers up and down my spine
The same old itchcraft when your touch meets mine
You tame that tingle when I'm all alone;
For I am single, so, to itch his own
So down and down you go
Around and around and around you go;
Scratching my unreachable zone
I should throw you away
But I never do;
I must give in to itchy skin
A skin with such a burning desire;
When I'm scratching low
The itching gets higher
Oh, you're the scrubber that placated me
That chased each place that irritated me;
And then, last night, you broke my heart
Because I sat down on you
Two hundred pounds on you
Then, snap, crack
Everything just went black
My wonderful old back scratcher fell apart
Yes, you broke in half
And now you're too short;
I tried Scotch tape as a last resort
But with Scotch tape it wasn't the same;
The thrill that was wild is suddenly tame
But, Old Man Sorrow will not get me down;
I leave tomorrow night for Chinatown
For I must follow Heaven's plan:
Around and around I'll go
Through Chinatown I'll go
Hoping to find another one just like you
An old Chinese back scratcher made in Japan!
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Mack A. Damia
2019-11-28 21:06:17 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 28 Nov 2019 12:37:35 -0800 (PST), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Spains Harden
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Spains Harden
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Spains Harden
Post by Spains Harden
More jives please. Or anything else you can find that is good, being
played on a 78rpm turntable. If you can find any Lindy Bop then more
power to your elbow.
ObAUE: "A can of ale" in AmE.
What does 'Arrison think "a can of ale" is AmE for, given that ale itself
is all but alien to AmE?
One of the best known AmE songs has it at 1 minute or so into it?
I know you don't do links so you can rejoice in your ignorance.
http://youtu.be/aJxoRIjyNlw
"BEST KNOWN"???? TO WHOM?
Why do you have "jive" on the brain?
And you did not answer the question. Why did you write "a can of ale
in AmE"?
1) Louis Prima was a New Orleans American.
2) His best known song features the line: "Papa's in the icebox lookin'
for a can of ale".
Neither of those makes it "One of the best known AmE songs." I have
vaguely heard of Louis Prima, I have never heard of that song ("Jump,
Jive, and Wail"), and it isn't even mentioned in his Wikiparticle. The
only songs named there that I do know of are "Sing, Sing, Sing" (from
its later cover by Benny Goodman) and "That Old Black Magic."
I remember the name Louis Prima. It was always said as in a duo with
his wife, Keely Smith. Their cover of Johnny Mercer's and Harold
Arlen's "That Old Black Magic," was a Top 20 hit in the US in 1958.
Tony Cooper
2019-11-28 22:36:45 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 28 Nov 2019 12:37:35 -0800 (PST), "Peter T. Daniels"
<***@verizon.net> wrote:

1) Louis Prima was a New Orleans American.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Spains Harden
2) His best known song features the line: "Papa's in the icebox lookin'
for a can of ale".
Neither of those makes it "One of the best known AmE songs." I have
vaguely heard of Louis Prima, I have never heard of that song ("Jump,
Jive, and Wail"), and it isn't even mentioned in his Wikiparticle. The
only songs named there that I do know of are "Sing, Sing, Sing" (from
its later cover by Benny Goodman) and "That Old Black Magic."
That's a shocker! I played my father's record with Benny Goodman's
1938 Carnegie Hall rendition of "Sing, Sing, Sing" until the grooves
wouldn't hold the needle.

I didn't know that Louis Prima wrote it. Prima's name was instantly
familiar to me, and I knew of him back when he and Keely Smith were on
the Ed Sullivan show.

If a best-known song has to be attributed to Prima, it would be "Sing,
Sing, Sing" based on the number of people who recognize that when they
hear it, but I doubt if many of those people would associate it with
Prima. They know the piece, but not who wrote it.

The number of people who know that song at the first notes is
diminishing daily, though. You'll find their names in the obits.

Prima, though, did not write "That Old Black Magic". That's a Harold
Arlen and Johnny Mercer number, and Prima was only one of many who
recorded it.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Mack A. Damia
2019-11-28 23:35:18 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 28 Nov 2019 17:36:45 -0500, Tony Cooper
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Thu, 28 Nov 2019 12:37:35 -0800 (PST), "Peter T. Daniels"
1) Louis Prima was a New Orleans American.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Spains Harden
2) His best known song features the line: "Papa's in the icebox lookin'
for a can of ale".
Neither of those makes it "One of the best known AmE songs." I have
vaguely heard of Louis Prima, I have never heard of that song ("Jump,
Jive, and Wail"), and it isn't even mentioned in his Wikiparticle. The
only songs named there that I do know of are "Sing, Sing, Sing" (from
its later cover by Benny Goodman) and "That Old Black Magic."
That's a shocker! I played my father's record with Benny Goodman's
1938 Carnegie Hall rendition of "Sing, Sing, Sing" until the grooves
wouldn't hold the needle.
I didn't know that Louis Prima wrote it. Prima's name was instantly
familiar to me, and I knew of him back when he and Keely Smith were on
the Ed Sullivan show.
If a best-known song has to be attributed to Prima, it would be "Sing,
Sing, Sing" based on the number of people who recognize that when they
hear it, but I doubt if many of those people would associate it with
Prima. They know the piece, but not who wrote it.
The number of people who know that song at the first notes is
diminishing daily, though. You'll find their names in the obits.
Prima, though, did not write "That Old Black Magic". That's a Harold
Arlen and Johnny Mercer number, and Prima was only one of many who
recorded it.
What's up with you these days, Tony?
Peter T. Daniels
2019-11-29 16:27:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Thu, 28 Nov 2019 12:37:35 -0800 (PST), "Peter T. Daniels"
1) Louis Prima was a New Orleans American.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Spains Harden
2) His best known song features the line: "Papa's in the icebox lookin'
for a can of ale".
Neither of those makes it "One of the best known AmE songs." I have
vaguely heard of Louis Prima, I have never heard of that song ("Jump,
Jive, and Wail"), and it isn't even mentioned in his Wikiparticle. The
only songs named there that I do know of are "Sing, Sing, Sing" (from
its later cover by Benny Goodman) and "That Old Black Magic."
That's a shocker!
What is?
Post by Mack A. Damia
I played my father's record with Benny Goodman's
1938 Carnegie Hall rendition of "Sing, Sing, Sing" until the grooves
wouldn't hold the needle.
I didn't know that Louis Prima wrote it. Prima's name was instantly
familiar to me, and I knew of him back when he and Keely Smith were on
the Ed Sullivan show.
If a best-known song has to be attributed to Prima, it would be "Sing,
Sing, Sing" based on the number of people who recognize that when they
hear it, but I doubt if many of those people would associate it with
Prima. They know the piece, but not who wrote it.
The number of people who know that song at the first notes is
diminishing daily, though. You'll find their names in the obits.
Prima, though, did not write "That Old Black Magic". That's a Harold
Arlen and Johnny Mercer number, and Prima was only one of many who
recorded it.
And I didn't say I know of this apparently famous Prima-Smith recording.
Ella Fitzgerald, maybe?
Spains Harden
2019-11-28 15:58:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Spains Harden
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Spains Harden
Post by Spains Harden
More jives please. Or anything else you can find that is good, being
played on a 78rpm turntable. If you can find any Lindy Bop then more
power to your elbow.
ObAUE: "A can of ale" in AmE.
What does 'Arrison think "a can of ale" is AmE for, given that ale itself
is all but alien to AmE?
One of the best known AmE songs has it at 1 minute or so into it?
I know you don't do links so you can rejoice in your ignorance.
http://youtu.be/aJxoRIjyNlw
"BEST KNOWN"???? TO WHOM?
Why do you have "jive" on the brain?
And you did not answer the question. Why did you write "a can of ale
in AmE"?
I also feel ashamed that have dissed the 78rpm, without thinking it
through. Technology must have moved at an incredible rate between
1926 and 1929. Louis Armstrong and his Hot 5:


Peter T. Daniels
2019-11-28 20:38:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by Spains Harden
I also feel ashamed that have dissed the 78rpm, without thinking it
through. Technology must have moved at an incredible rate between
http://youtu.be/xKxnPqRz5R8
You haven't heard of the invention of electrical recording? (Microphone
rather than funnel.)
Spains Harden
2019-11-28 16:06:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Spains Harden
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Spains Harden
Post by Spains Harden
More jives please. Or anything else you can find that is good, being
played on a 78rpm turntable. If you can find any Lindy Bop then more
power to your elbow.
ObAUE: "A can of ale" in AmE.
What does 'Arrison think "a can of ale" is AmE for, given that ale itself
is all but alien to AmE?
One of the best known AmE songs has it at 1 minute or so into it?
I know you don't do links so you can rejoice in your ignorance.
http://youtu.be/aJxoRIjyNlw
"BEST KNOWN"???? TO WHOM?
Why do you have "jive" on the brain?
And you did not answer the question. Why did you write "a can of ale
in AmE"?
More trivia: Nipper the dog (on the British HMV logo; featured on
that record being puzzled at hearing "His Master's Voice"), is buried
in my home town of Kingston.
David Kleinecke
2019-11-27 20:53:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Spains Harden
Post by Spains Harden
We used to go to the International Dance Competition at the Albert
Hall in London - we got free tickets. Over 10 years or so I noticed
that although the various dance-styles were danced to various
"standards", there was only ever one choice for the jive. Before
you click it: what is the only jive the professional dancers
consider jively enough?
http://youtu.be/aJxoRIjyNlw
More jives please. Or anything else you can find that is good, being
played on a 78rpm turntable. If you can find any Lindy Bop then more
power to your elbow.
ObAUE: "A can of ale" in AmE.
What does 'Arrison think "a can of ale" is AmE for, given that ale itself
is all but alien to AmE?
There was a little man
And he had a little can
And he usta rush the growler

He went to the saloon
On a Sunday afternoon
And you oughta heard the bartender holler:

No more booze, no more booze, no more booze on Sunday
No more booze. Gotta get your can filled Monday
Loading...