Discussion:
How do Anglophones say "in high dudgeon"?
(too old to reply)
Dingbat
2021-03-26 02:14:15 UTC
Permalink
How do Anglophones say "in high dudgeon"?

I was taught to use it, in India, but I haven't found an Anglophone who currently uses it.
Stefan Ram
2021-03-26 02:46:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dingbat
How do Anglophones say "in high dudgeon"?
|in a rage
|in rage
|in anger
|full of resentment
|resentful
|very upset
|very angry
|very indignant
|very outraged
|very offended
|having a tantrum
|showing rancor
|being indignant/irascible
|wrathful
|furious
|irate
|ireful
|mad
|choleric

A: What would be an example of someone choleric?
B: Louis de Funes.
A: No, I mean someone who is choleric AND likeable!
B: Louis de Funes.
J. J. Lodder
2021-05-05 09:55:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by Stefan Ram
Post by Dingbat
How do Anglophones say "in high dudgeon"?
A: What would be an example of someone choleric?
B: Louis de Funes.
A: No, I mean someone who is choleric AND likeable!
B: Louis de Funes.
In the news, as being only one step behind Napoleon
in the list of greatest Frenchmen, at #17.
Napoleon has to give way to Jules Verne, at #15.

But Napoleon generates far more controversy,
despite being only #16

Jan

Tony Cooper
2021-03-26 02:49:29 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 25 Mar 2021 19:14:15 -0700 (PDT), Dingbat
Post by Dingbat
How do Anglophones say "in high dudgeon"?
I was taught to use it, in India, but I haven't found an Anglophone who currently uses it.
I don't think I ever have uttered that phase. If I would, I would say
"dudge-un". But I wouldn't try. It would be my luck to be around
someone who would say "Where in the world did you learn that dudgeon
is pronounced like that?".
--
Tony Cooper Orlando Florida
Snidely
2021-05-03 20:30:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tony Cooper
On Thu, 25 Mar 2021 19:14:15 -0700 (PDT), Dingbat
Post by Dingbat
How do Anglophones say "in high dudgeon"?
I was taught to use it, in India, but I haven't found an Anglophone who
currently uses it.
I don't think I ever have uttered that phase. If I would, I would say
"dudge-un". But I wouldn't try. It would be my luck to be around
someone who would say "Where in the world did you learn that dudgeon
is pronounced like that?".
My answer: reading pronunciation. It is rather an old-fashioned verb
around here, most often encountered in historical novels.

/dps "some of which are hysterical in the modern sense"
--
"This is all very fine, but let us not be carried away be excitement,
but ask calmly, how does this person feel about in in his cooler
moments next day, with six or seven thousand feet of snow and stuff on
top of him?"
_Roughing It_, Mark Twain.
Eric Walker
2021-03-26 04:33:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dingbat
How do Anglophones say "in high dudgeon"?
I was taught to use it, in India, but I haven't found an Anglophone who currently uses it.
AHD 5th:

dudg·eon 1 (dŭjən)
n. A sullen, angry, or indignant humor.
--
Cordially,
Eric Walker
Dingbat
2021-03-28 00:12:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by Eric Walker
Post by Dingbat
How do Anglophones say "in high dudgeon"?
I was taught to use it, in India, but I haven't found an Anglophone who
currently uses it.
dudg·eon 1 (dŭjən)
n. A sullen, angry, or indignant humor.
I don't find Anglophones currently using "in ill humor" either.
Peter Moylan
2021-03-28 01:16:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dingbat
Post by Eric Walker
Post by Dingbat
How do Anglophones say "in high dudgeon"?
I was taught to use it, in India, but I haven't found an Anglophone who
currently uses it.
dudg·eon 1 (dŭjən)
n. A sullen, angry, or indignant humor.
I don't find Anglophones currently using "in ill humor" either.
It's used now and then, but the idea that our moods are controlled by
the humours inside our bodies is falling out of fashion. The only bodily
humour that we still believe in is the one that makes a person a comedian.
--
Peter Moylan Newcastle, NSW http://www.pmoylan.org
Snidely
2021-05-03 20:30:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Dingbat
Post by Eric Walker
Post by Dingbat
How do Anglophones say "in high dudgeon"?
I was taught to use it, in India, but I haven't found an Anglophone who
currently uses it.
dudg·eon 1 (dŭjən)
n. A sullen, angry, or indignant humor.
I don't find Anglophones currently using "in ill humor" either.
It's used now and then, but the idea that our moods are controlled by
the humours inside our bodies is falling out of fashion. The only bodily
humour that we still believe in is the one that makes a person a comedian.
The updated version is the feedback loop between the endocrine system
and the nervous system. And various chemical warfare^Wwelfare
symptoms.

/dps
--
"First thing in the morning, before I have coffee, I read the obits, If
I'm not in it, I'll have breakfast." -- Carl Reiner, to CBS News in
2015.
Janet
2021-03-28 12:41:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dingbat
Post by Dingbat
How do Anglophones say "in high dudgeon"?
I was taught to use it, in India, but I haven't found an Anglophone who
currently uses it.
dudg·eon 1 (duj??n)
n. A sullen, angry, or indignant humor.
I don't find Anglophones currently using "in ill humor" either.
google "the four humours". Don't forget the U.

Janet
Janet
2021-03-26 13:24:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dingbat
How do Anglophones say "in high dudgeon"?
I was taught to use it, in India, but I haven't found an Anglophone who currently uses it.
Don't get your knickers in a twist. There are many common terms I
recognise and understand, but don't use.

Janet
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2021-03-26 14:12:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by Janet
Post by Dingbat
How do Anglophones say "in high dudgeon"?
I was taught to use it, in India, but I haven't found an Anglophone who
currently uses it.
Don't get your knickers in a twist. There are many common terms I
recognise and understand, but don't use.
Yes, that pretty much goes for me too. I certainly understand "in high
dudgeon", but I don't think I've ever said.
--
Athel -- British, living in France for 34 years
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2021-03-26 20:47:34 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 26 Mar 2021 15:12:10 +0100, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Janet
Post by Dingbat
How do Anglophones say "in high dudgeon"?
I was taught to use it, in India, but I haven't found an Anglophone who
currently uses it.
Don't get your knickers in a twist. There are many common terms I
recognise and understand, but don't use.
Yes, that pretty much goes for me too. I certainly understand "in high
dudgeon", but I don't think I've ever said.
I too know the word.

I knew a man with that word as a surname:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jeff_Dudgeon

Jeffrey Edward Anthony "Jeff" Dudgeon MBE is a Northern Irish
politician, historian and gay political activist.
....
As part of the 2012 New Year Honours, Dudgeon was appointed a Member
of the Order of the British Empire (MBE) for "services to the
Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender community in Northern
Ireland".
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Peter T. Daniels
2021-03-26 21:47:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
I too know the word.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jeff_Dudgeon
Jeffrey Edward Anthony "Jeff" Dudgeon MBE is a Northern Irish
politician, historian and gay political activist.
....
As part of the 2012 New Year Honours, Dudgeon was appointed a Member
of the Order of the British Empire (MBE) for "services to the
Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender community in Northern
Ireland".
He could've been cited for "services to the queens" ... </Quentin_Crisp>
Bob Martin
2021-03-27 07:19:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Fri, 26 Mar 2021 15:12:10 +0100, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Janet
Post by Dingbat
How do Anglophones say "in high dudgeon"?
I was taught to use it, in India, but I haven't found an Anglophone =
who
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Janet
Post by Dingbat
currently uses it.
Don't get your knickers in a twist. There are many common terms I
recognise and understand, but don't use.
Yes, that pretty much goes for me too. I certainly understand "in high
dudgeon", but I don't think I've ever said.
I too know the word.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jeff_Dudgeon
Jeffrey Edward Anthony "Jeff" Dudgeon MBE is a Northern Irish
politician, historian and gay political activist.
....
As part of the 2012 New Year Honours, Dudgeon was appointed a Member
of the Order of the British Empire (MBE) for "services to the
Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender community in Northern
Ireland".
Neil Dudgeon is the current star of Midsomer Murders.
S K
2021-05-03 23:09:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dingbat
How do Anglophones say "in high dudgeon"?
I was taught to use it, in India, but I haven't found an Anglophone who currently uses it.
"Anglophone"?

brings up images of marmite, the Queen, tea-cozies, wogs who still worship the Brits and so forth.

Why not "English speakers"?
bil...@shaw.ca
2021-05-04 00:05:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by S K
Post by Dingbat
How do Anglophones say "in high dudgeon"?
I was taught to use it, in India, but I haven't found an Anglophone who currently uses it.
"Anglophone"?
brings up images of marmite, the Queen, tea-cozies, wogs who still worship the Brits and so forth.
Why not "English speakers"?
Because not every corner of the English language uses the same idioms, or for that matter,
the rather stilted stereotypes you trotted out.

bill
Peter T. Daniels
2021-05-04 14:10:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by ***@shaw.ca
Post by S K
Post by Dingbat
How do Anglophones say "in high dudgeon"?
I was taught to use it, in India, but I haven't found an Anglophone who currently uses it.
"Anglophone"?
brings up images of marmite, the Queen, tea-cozies, wogs who still worship the Brits and so forth.
Why not "English speakers"?
Because not every corner of the English language uses the same idioms, or for that matter,
the rather stilted stereotypes you trotted out.
During your brief sabbatical, the Skippy troll returned with a slightly
different name. Please don't feed it.
bil...@shaw.ca
2021-05-04 20:12:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by ***@shaw.ca
Post by S K
Post by Dingbat
How do Anglophones say "in high dudgeon"?
I was taught to use it, in India, but I haven't found an Anglophone who currently uses it.
"Anglophone"?
brings up images of marmite, the Queen, tea-cozies, wogs who still worship the Brits and so forth.
Why not "English speakers"?
Because not every corner of the English language uses the same idioms, or for that matter,
the rather stilted stereotypes you trotted out.
During your brief sabbatical, the Skippy troll returned with a slightly
different name. Please don't feed it.
That makes sense. I had worked out since posting the above that something trollish was afoot,
and now you've put a name to it.

bill
S K
2021-05-04 22:04:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by ***@shaw.ca
Post by S K
Post by Dingbat
How do Anglophones say "in high dudgeon"?
I was taught to use it, in India, but I haven't found an Anglophone who currently uses it.
"Anglophone"?
brings up images of marmite, the Queen, tea-cozies, wogs who still worship the Brits and so forth.
Why not "English speakers"?
Because not every corner of the English language uses the same idioms, or for that matter,
the rather stilted stereotypes you trotted out.
During your brief sabbatical, the Skippy troll returned with a slightly
different name. Please don't feed it.
That makes sense. I had worked out since posting the above that something trollish was afoot,
and now you've put a name to it.
bill
strew flowers at the feet of the curse on humanity for straightening you out.

is he the "catcher in the rye" to protect you children from ugly trolls?

Fuck man, don't be a fucking baby and tell the curse to go fuck himself and that you'd decide for yourself who to respond to.
S K
2021-05-04 22:11:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by ***@shaw.ca
Post by S K
Post by Dingbat
How do Anglophones say "in high dudgeon"?
I was taught to use it, in India, but I haven't found an Anglophone who currently uses it.
"Anglophone"?
brings up images of marmite, the Queen, tea-cozies, wogs who still worship the Brits and so forth.
Why not "English speakers"?
Because not every corner of the English language uses the same idioms, or for that matter,
the rather stilted stereotypes you trotted out.
During your brief sabbatical, the Skippy troll returned with a slightly
different name. Please don't feed it.
That makes sense. I had worked out since posting the above that something trollish was afoot,
and now you've put a name to it.
bill
you non-descript white children, who cannot grow up, but masquerade as adults, mean nothing.

Arindam Mahashay alone makes this place worthwhile for me.

Making the curse froth at the mouth in impotent rage is a sadistic pastime I indulge in sometimes- but these days he tries to stay away, afraid he'd catch cooties. but the moth cannot avoid getting singed by the flame - thats just the way life is.
Arindam Banerjee
2021-05-04 22:41:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by ***@shaw.ca
Post by S K
Post by Dingbat
How do Anglophones say "in high dudgeon"?
I was taught to use it, in India, but I haven't found an Anglophone who currently uses it.
"Anglophone"?
brings up images of marmite, the Queen, tea-cozies, wogs who still worship the Brits and so forth.
Why not "English speakers"?
Because not every corner of the English language uses the same idioms, or for that matter,
the rather stilted stereotypes you trotted out.
During your brief sabbatical, the Skippy troll returned with a slightly
different name. Please don't feed it.
That makes sense. I had worked out since posting the above that something trollish was afoot,
and now you've put a name to it.
bill
you non-descript white children, who cannot grow up, but masquerade as adults, mean nothing.
Arindam Mahashay alone makes this place worthwhile for me.
Making the curse froth at the mouth in impotent rage is a sadistic pastime I indulge in sometimes- but these days he tries to stay away, afraid he'd catch cooties. but the moth cannot avoid getting singed by the flame - thats just the way life is.
The whites here are not all bad. But as you say, there are some rotten fish around. Very different from the excellent whites I have had the privilege of knowing, right from my schooling in India to the present.
S K
2021-05-04 22:55:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by Arindam Banerjee
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by ***@shaw.ca
Post by S K
Post by Dingbat
How do Anglophones say "in high dudgeon"?
I was taught to use it, in India, but I haven't found an Anglophone who currently uses it.
"Anglophone"?
brings up images of marmite, the Queen, tea-cozies, wogs who still worship the Brits and so forth.
Why not "English speakers"?
Because not every corner of the English language uses the same idioms, or for that matter,
the rather stilted stereotypes you trotted out.
During your brief sabbatical, the Skippy troll returned with a slightly
different name. Please don't feed it.
That makes sense. I had worked out since posting the above that something trollish was afoot,
and now you've put a name to it.
bill
you non-descript white children, who cannot grow up, but masquerade as adults, mean nothing.
Arindam Mahashay alone makes this place worthwhile for me.
Making the curse froth at the mouth in impotent rage is a sadistic pastime I indulge in sometimes- but these days he tries to stay away, afraid he'd catch cooties. but the moth cannot avoid getting singed by the flame - thats just the way life is.
The whites here are not all bad. But as you say, there are some rotten fish around. Very different from the excellent whites I have had the privilege of knowing, right from my schooling in India to the present.
I didn't say they are bad.

they are all children.

the curse is like Chucky and has no redeeming features.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chucky_(character)
Arindam Banerjee
2021-05-04 23:05:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by S K
Post by Arindam Banerjee
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by ***@shaw.ca
Post by S K
Post by Dingbat
How do Anglophones say "in high dudgeon"?
I was taught to use it, in India, but I haven't found an Anglophone who currently uses it.
"Anglophone"?
brings up images of marmite, the Queen, tea-cozies, wogs who still worship the Brits and so forth.
Why not "English speakers"?
Because not every corner of the English language uses the same idioms, or for that matter,
the rather stilted stereotypes you trotted out.
During your brief sabbatical, the Skippy troll returned with a slightly
different name. Please don't feed it.
That makes sense. I had worked out since posting the above that something trollish was afoot,
and now you've put a name to it.
bill
you non-descript white children, who cannot grow up, but masquerade as adults, mean nothing.
Arindam Mahashay alone makes this place worthwhile for me.
Making the curse froth at the mouth in impotent rage is a sadistic pastime I indulge in sometimes- but these days he tries to stay away, afraid he'd catch cooties. but the moth cannot avoid getting singed by the flame - thats just the way life is.
The whites here are not all bad. But as you say, there are some rotten fish around. Very different from the excellent whites I have had the privilege of knowing, right from my schooling in India to the present.
I didn't say they are bad.
they are all children.
the curse is like Chucky and has no redeeming features.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chucky_(character)
They are old enough.
To support what is bad, is bad.
Arindam Banerjee
2021-05-04 03:55:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dingbat
How do Anglophones say "in high dudgeon"?
I was taught to use it, in India, but I haven't found an Anglophone who currently uses it
As in sturgeon, gudgeon, I presume.
S K
2021-05-04 11:44:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by Arindam Banerjee
Post by Dingbat
How do Anglophones say "in high dudgeon"?
I was taught to use it, in India, but I haven't found an Anglophone who currently uses it
As in sturgeon, gudgeon, I presume.
burgeon?
Loading...