Discussion:
a few times more
Add Reply
Quinn C
2019-11-05 22:45:08 UTC
Reply
Permalink
| She had combed New York since September, gone back and combed it a
| few times more, and she hadn't found anything.

from: Patricia Highsmith, The Price of Salt

I wonder about the difference between "a few times more" and "a few
more times", which feels more standard to me. I feel there is a
difference, but can't nail it down. What do people think, or in this
case, maybe feel, rather?
--
Was den Juengeren fehlt, sind keine Botschaften, es ist der Sinn
fuer Zusammenhaenge. [Young people aren't short of messages, but
of a sense for interconnections.]
-- Helen Feng im Zeit-Interview
Ken Blake
2019-11-05 22:57:48 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Quinn C
| She had combed New York since September, gone back and combed it a
| few times more, and she hadn't found anything.
from: Patricia Highsmith, The Price of Salt
I wonder about the difference between "a few times more" and "a few
more times", which feels more standard to me. I feel there is a
difference, but can't nail it down. What do people think, or in this
case, maybe feel, rather?
To me there's no difference--just two ways of saying the same thing.
--
Ken
Richard Heathfield
2019-11-05 22:58:38 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Quinn C
| She had combed New York since September, gone back and combed it a
| few times more, and she hadn't found anything.
from: Patricia Highsmith, The Price of Salt
I wonder about the difference between "a few times more" and "a few
more times", which feels more standard to me. I feel there is a
difference, but can't nail it down. What do people think, or in this
case, maybe feel, rather?
To me there's no difference--just two ways of saying the same thing.
Just two ways of saying the same thing -- there's no difference to me.
--
Richard Heathfield
Email: rjh at cpax dot org dot uk
"Usenet is a strange place" - dmr 29 July 1999
Sig line 4 vacant - apply within
John Varela
2019-11-06 02:14:20 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Tue, 5 Nov 2019 22:45:08 UTC, Quinn C
Post by Quinn C
| She had combed New York since September, gone back and combed it a
| few times more, and she hadn't found anything.
from: Patricia Highsmith, The Price of Salt
I wonder about the difference between "a few times more" and "a few
more times", which feels more standard to me. I feel there is a
difference, but can't nail it down. What do people think, or in this
case, maybe feel, rather?
I think that "a few times more" carries a hint of frustration at
having done this so many times.
--
John Varela
s***@gmail.com
2019-11-06 06:38:48 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by John Varela
On Tue, 5 Nov 2019 22:45:08 UTC, Quinn C
Post by Quinn C
| She had combed New York since September, gone back and combed it a
| few times more, and she hadn't found anything.
from: Patricia Highsmith, The Price of Salt
I wonder about the difference between "a few times more" and "a few
more times", which feels more standard to me. I feel there is a
difference, but can't nail it down. What do people think, or in this
case, maybe feel, rather?
I think that "a few times more" carries a hint of frustration at
having done this so many times.
I think I agree with you. But it is also perhaps a matter of rhythm.

/dps
Paul Carmichael
2019-11-06 10:07:21 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by s***@gmail.com
Post by John Varela
On Tue, 5 Nov 2019 22:45:08 UTC, Quinn C
Post by Quinn C
| She had combed New York since September, gone back and combed it a
| few times more, and she hadn't found anything.
from: Patricia Highsmith, The Price of Salt
I wonder about the difference between "a few times more" and "a few
more times", which feels more standard to me. I feel there is a
difference, but can't nail it down. What do people think, or in this
case, maybe feel, rather?
I think that "a few times more" carries a hint of frustration at
having done this so many times.
I think I agree with you. But it is also perhaps a matter of rhythm.
/dps
+1, but I'd also say there may be a hint of foreignism.
--
Paul.

https://paulc.es
CDB
2019-11-06 12:20:14 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Quinn C
| She had combed New York since September, gone back and combed it a
| few times more, and she hadn't found anything.
from: Patricia Highsmith, The Price of Salt
I wonder about the difference between "a few times more" and "a few
more times", which feels more standard to me. I feel there is a
difference, but can't nail it down. What do people think, or in this
case, maybe feel, rather?
Partly stylistic, I think -- "a few times more" gives a better cadence.
It might also be a question of grammar: "more" there is clearly an
adverb, but what part of speech is it in "a few more times", and what
does "few" modify? At best, that is not clear.
Peter T. Daniels
2019-11-06 14:06:59 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by CDB
Post by Quinn C
| She had combed New York since September, gone back and combed it a
| few times more, and she hadn't found anything.
from: Patricia Highsmith, The Price of Salt
I wonder about the difference between "a few times more" and "a few
more times", which feels more standard to me. I feel there is a
difference, but can't nail it down. What do people think, or in this
case, maybe feel, rather?
Partly stylistic, I think -- "a few times more" gives a better cadence.
It might also be a question of grammar: "more" there is clearly an
adverb, but what part of speech is it in "a few more times", and what
does "few" modify? At best, that is not clear.
"A few more times" is utterly standard and prosaic.
CDB
2019-11-07 14:29:05 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by CDB
Post by Quinn C
| She had combed New York since September, gone back and combed
Patricia Highsmith, The Price of Salt I wonder about the
difference between "a few times more" and "a few more times",
which feels more standard to me. I feel there is a difference,
but can't nail it down. What do people think, or in this case,
maybe feel, rather?
Partly stylistic, I think -- "a few times more" gives a better
cadence. It might also be a question of grammar: "more" there is
clearly an adverb, but what part of speech is it in "a few more
times", and what does "few" modify? At best, that is not clear.
"A few more times" is utterly standard and prosaic.
It is certainly in common use. How would you parse it, giving
particular attention to "more"?
Peter T. Daniels
2019-11-07 14:51:41 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by CDB
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by CDB
Post by Quinn C
| She had combed New York since September, gone back and combed
Patricia Highsmith, The Price of Salt I wonder about the
difference between "a few times more" and "a few more times",
which feels more standard to me. I feel there is a difference,
but can't nail it down. What do people think, or in this case,
maybe feel, rather?
Partly stylistic, I think -- "a few times more" gives a better
cadence. It might also be a question of grammar: "more" there is
clearly an adverb, but what part of speech is it in "a few more
times", and what does "few" modify? At best, that is not clear.
"A few more times" is utterly standard and prosaic.
It is certainly in common use. How would you parse it, giving
particular attention to "more"?
Well, it's an adverbial phrase, but the head of the phrase is a noun,
so the modifier must be an adjective? (The postposing in Highsmith's
version might be analyzed however you analyze "galore.")

"Few" must be a noun, because it has an article!

We should ask DK.
David Kleinecke
2019-11-07 20:45:36 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by CDB
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by CDB
Post by Quinn C
| She had combed New York since September, gone back and combed
Patricia Highsmith, The Price of Salt I wonder about the
difference between "a few times more" and "a few more times",
which feels more standard to me. I feel there is a difference,
but can't nail it down. What do people think, or in this case,
maybe feel, rather?
Partly stylistic, I think -- "a few times more" gives a better
cadence. It might also be a question of grammar: "more" there is
clearly an adverb, but what part of speech is it in "a few more
times", and what does "few" modify? At best, that is not clear.
"A few more times" is utterly standard and prosaic.
It is certainly in common use. How would you parse it, giving
particular attention to "more"?
Well, it's an adverbial phrase, but the head of the phrase is a noun,
so the modifier must be an adjective? (The postposing in Highsmith's
version might be analyzed however you analyze "galore.")
"Few" must be a noun, because it has an article!
We should ask DK.
When I post my piece on "inverse syntactic junctures" in sci.lang
I will have a bit to say about English comparative constructions.
The situation is quite complicated and I have seen no satisfactory
analysis - which does not mean there isn't one, only that I don't
know of one.

Peter T. Daniels
2019-11-06 14:05:55 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Quinn C
| She had combed New York since September, gone back and combed it a
| few times more, and she hadn't found anything.
from: Patricia Highsmith, The Price of Salt
I wonder about the difference between "a few times more" and "a few
more times", which feels more standard to me. I feel there is a
difference, but can't nail it down. What do people think, or in this
case, maybe feel, rather?
It's the sound. You don't want to end a rhetorical flourish with the
closed-off sound of [mz] but with the lingering [O:(r)].

This sort of thing is discussed in a remarkable book *The Orchestra
of the Language* by Ernest M. Robson (NY: Yoselson, 1959), which I've
never seen mentioned anywhere. One of his chief examples is "blood,
toil, tears, and sweat" vs. "blood, sweat, and tears."

Highsmith was a great master-mistress of the language. Hitchcock's
*Strangers on a Train* didn't do her justice.
Jerry Friedman
2019-11-06 15:00:02 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Quinn C
| She had combed New York since September, gone back and combed it a
| few times more, and she hadn't found anything.
from: Patricia Highsmith, The Price of Salt
I wonder about the difference between "a few times more" and "a few
more times", which feels more standard to me. I feel there is a
difference, but can't nail it down. What do people think, or in this
case, maybe feel, rather?
It's the sound. You don't want to end a rhetorical flourish with the
closed-off sound of [mz] but with the lingering [O:(r)].
...

Also because "more" is the key word and so goes well at the end.
--
Jerry Friedman
Joseph C. Fineman
2019-11-06 18:38:34 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Quinn C
| She had combed New York since September, gone back and combed it a
| few times more, and she hadn't found anything.
from: Patricia Highsmith, The Price of Salt
I wonder about the difference between "a few times more" and "a few
more times", which feels more standard to me. I feel there is a
difference, but can't nail it down. What do people think, or in this
case, maybe feel, rather?
In this context, they mean the same to me, the first being a bit
formal. However, if "times" is taken in the sense of multiplication,
then the second seems to me impossible, and the first, with some
awkwardness, might be taken to mean "larger by a factor of a few".
--
--- Joe Fineman ***@verizon.net

||: Beware of anything that answers everything. :||
s***@gmail.com
2019-11-06 22:17:13 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Joseph C. Fineman
Post by Quinn C
| She had combed New York since September, gone back and combed it a
| few times more, and she hadn't found anything.
from: Patricia Highsmith, The Price of Salt
I wonder about the difference between "a few times more" and "a few
more times", which feels more standard to me. I feel there is a
difference, but can't nail it down. What do people think, or in this
case, maybe feel, rather?
In this context, they mean the same to me, the first being a bit
formal. However, if "times" is taken in the sense of multiplication,
then the second seems to me impossible, and the first, with some
awkwardness, might be taken to mean "larger by a factor of a few".
Why would you take "times" in the sense of multiplication?
The natural take is the sense of occurrences.

/dps
Loading...