narkive is for sale. Interested? (dismiss)
Discussion:
Australia geography
(too old to reply)
Peter T. Daniels
2019-12-18 15:59:18 UTC
Permalink
In last night's Miss Fisher's Murder Mysteries (from 2013), set in Melbourne,
Inspector Jack Robinson refers to a jewel thief who's been hitting salons
d'haute couture as having done the same at something like "Sydney up on the
North Shore," and I tried to picture what Sydney is on the northern shore
of; but then I supposed it might mean where the northern end of the Harbour
Bridge was or was about to be (the time seems to be fairly early in the
1920s). In that case, that side of Sydney Harbour must have been the posh
area? (One can't tell from the photographs whether the Opera House is at
the north or south end of the bridge.) (Or, for that matter, what compass
direction the bridge lies on.)

It was from the Second Series; the DVD price, as offered at the end of the
program, is as elevated as BBC DVDs are; do Phryne and Jack ever get together,
or have they kept just making googly-eyes at each other for however long the
show has lasted? Collins (does he even have a first name?) and Dot are doing
much better on that front.
Horace LaBadie
2019-12-18 16:12:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
In last night's Miss Fisher's Murder Mysteries (from 2013), set in Melbourne,
Inspector Jack Robinson refers to a jewel thief who's been hitting salons
d'haute couture as having done the same at something like "Sydney up on the
North Shore," and I tried to picture what Sydney is on the northern shore
of; but then I supposed it might mean where the northern end of the Harbour
Bridge was or was about to be (the time seems to be fairly early in the
1920s). In that case, that side of Sydney Harbour must have been the posh
area? (One can't tell from the photographs whether the Opera House is at
the north or south end of the bridge.) (Or, for that matter, what compass
direction the bridge lies on.)
It was from the Second Series; the DVD price, as offered at the end of the
program, is as elevated as BBC DVDs are; do Phryne and Jack ever get together,
or have they kept just making googly-eyes at each other for however long the
show has lasted? Collins (does he even have a first name?) and Dot are doing
much better on that front.
Apparently, she and Jack still had not married by the time she
disappeared during a trip to New Guinea in 1964, according to the
backstory given in the spinoff series "Ms. Fisher's Modern Murder
Mysteries" (2019).
Peter T. Daniels
2019-12-18 16:38:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Peter T. Daniels
In last night's Miss Fisher's Murder Mysteries (from 2013), set in Melbourne,
Inspector Jack Robinson refers to a jewel thief who's been hitting salons
d'haute couture as having done the same at something like "Sydney up on the
North Shore," and I tried to picture what Sydney is on the northern shore
of; but then I supposed it might mean where the northern end of the Harbour
Bridge was or was about to be (the time seems to be fairly early in the
1920s). In that case, that side of Sydney Harbour must have been the posh
area? (One can't tell from the photographs whether the Opera House is at
the north or south end of the bridge.) (Or, for that matter, what compass
direction the bridge lies on.)
It was from the Second Series; the DVD price, as offered at the end of the
program, is as elevated as BBC DVDs are; do Phryne and Jack ever get together,
or have they kept just making googly-eyes at each other for however long the
show has lasted? Collins (does he even have a first name?) and Dot are doing
much better on that front.
Apparently, she and Jack still had not married by the time she
disappeared during a trip to New Guinea in 1964, according to the
backstory given in the spinoff series "Ms. Fisher's Modern Murder
Mysteries" (2019).
Oy! I suppose we'll be getting those a few years from now.

LET'S
Horace LaBadie
2019-12-18 17:14:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Peter T. Daniels
In last night's Miss Fisher's Murder Mysteries (from 2013), set in Melbourne,
Inspector Jack Robinson refers to a jewel thief who's been hitting salons
d'haute couture as having done the same at something like "Sydney up on the
North Shore," and I tried to picture what Sydney is on the northern shore
of; but then I supposed it might mean where the northern end of the Harbour
Bridge was or was about to be (the time seems to be fairly early in the
1920s). In that case, that side of Sydney Harbour must have been the posh
area? (One can't tell from the photographs whether the Opera House is at
the north or south end of the bridge.) (Or, for that matter, what compass
direction the bridge lies on.)
It was from the Second Series; the DVD price, as offered at the end of the
program, is as elevated as BBC DVDs are; do Phryne and Jack ever get together,
or have they kept just making googly-eyes at each other for however long the
show has lasted? Collins (does he even have a first name?) and Dot are doing
much better on that front.
Apparently, she and Jack still had not married by the time she
disappeared during a trip to New Guinea in 1964, according to the
backstory given in the spinoff series "Ms. Fisher's Modern Murder
Mysteries" (2019).
Oy! I suppose we'll be getting those a few years from now.
LET'S
It's available on DVD.
Peter T. Daniels
2019-12-18 21:25:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Horace LaBadie
Apparently, she and Jack still had not married by the time she
disappeared during a trip to New Guinea in 1964, according to the
backstory given in the spinoff series "Ms. Fisher's Modern Murder
Mysteries" (2019).
Oy! I suppose we'll be getting those a few years from now.
It's available on DVD.
! Over Here, DVDs usually come out a year after a season first airs.
Horace LaBadie
2019-12-18 22:33:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Horace LaBadie
Apparently, she and Jack still had not married by the time she
disappeared during a trip to New Guinea in 1964, according to the
backstory given in the spinoff series "Ms. Fisher's Modern Murder
Mysteries" (2019).
Oy! I suppose we'll be getting those a few years from now.
It's available on DVD.
! Over Here, DVDs usually come out a year after a season first airs.
Well, Walnart is about ten miles from where I live here in the USA. I
got my copy there at a reasonable price. Two disks, four 90 minute
episodes.
Peter T. Daniels
2019-12-18 21:19:36 UTC
Permalink
[removing the actual question]
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Peter T. Daniels
It was from the Second Series; the DVD price, as offered at the end of the
program, is as elevated as BBC DVDs are; do Phryne and Jack ever get together,
or have they kept just making googly-eyes at each other for however long the
show has lasted? Collins (does he even have a first name?) and Dot are doing
much better on that front.
Apparently, she and Jack still had not married by the time she
disappeared during a trip to New Guinea in 1964, according to the
backstory given in the spinoff series "Ms. Fisher's Modern Murder
Mysteries" (2019).
Oy! I suppose we'll be getting those a few years from now.

Let's see, if Ms. Fisher is Miss Fisher's granddaughter or great-
grqanddaughter, who would the (great-)grandfather be? The intermediate
person(s) were either male or unmarried females ...

ObAUE: it could be "unmarried and female," or it could be "males and ..."
but neither of those seems right.
Horace LaBadie
2019-12-18 22:35:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
[removing the actual question]
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Peter T. Daniels
It was from the Second Series; the DVD price, as offered at the end of the
program, is as elevated as BBC DVDs are; do Phryne and Jack ever get together,
or have they kept just making googly-eyes at each other for however long the
show has lasted? Collins (does he even have a first name?) and Dot are doing
much better on that front.
Apparently, she and Jack still had not married by the time she
disappeared during a trip to New Guinea in 1964, according to the
backstory given in the spinoff series "Ms. Fisher's Modern Murder
Mysteries" (2019).
Oy! I suppose we'll be getting those a few years from now.
Let's see, if Ms. Fisher is Miss Fisher's granddaughter or great-
grqanddaughter, who would the (great-)grandfather be? The intermediate
person(s) were either male or unmarried females ...
ObAUE: it could be "unmarried and female," or it could be "males and ..."
but neither of those seems right.
Peregrine Fisher is Miss Fisher's niece by a long-lost sister Annabel,
who pre-deceased the presumed dead Phryne. Evidently, she is her sole
surviving relation.
Peter T. Daniels
2019-12-19 15:13:34 UTC
Permalink
[written yesterday]
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Peter T. Daniels
[removing the actual question]
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Peter T. Daniels
It was from the Second Series; the DVD price, as offered at the end of the
program, is as elevated as BBC DVDs are; do Phryne and Jack ever get together,
or have they kept just making googly-eyes at each other for however long the
show has lasted? Collins (does he even have a first name?) and Dot are doing
much better on that front.
Apparently, she and Jack still had not married by the time she
disappeared during a trip to New Guinea in 1964, according to the
backstory given in the spinoff series "Ms. Fisher's Modern Murder
Mysteries" (2019).
Oy! I suppose we'll be getting those a few years from now.
Let's see, if Ms. Fisher is Miss Fisher's granddaughter or great-
grqanddaughter, who would the (great-)grandfather be? The intermediate
person(s) were either male or unmarried females ...
ObAUE: it could be "unmarried and female," or it could be "males and ..."
but neither of those seems right.
Peregrine Fisher is Miss Fisher's niece by a long-lost sister Annabel,
who pre-deceased the presumed dead Phryne. Evidently, she is her sole
surviving relation.
So Annabel Fisher also defied convention and either mothered out of wedlock
or didn't take her husband's name. If it's set in the present (i.e. 2019),
then Ms. Fisher would seem to be at least as old as Miss Marple was when
she made all her documentaries! (It's remarkable how much Miss Marple's
appearance changed between her various groups of documentaries -- sometimes
she looked like Margaret Rutherford, sometimes like Helen Hayes ...)

A similar problem is raised by Father Brown, who follows Miss Fisher on
ch. 21.2. He now appears to be in the early postwar years, although his
appearance and those of the supporting personages have not changed since
his earlier days that were dated, by the cars at least, 15 or so years
earlier.
Horace LaBadie
2019-12-19 16:23:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
[written yesterday]
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Peter T. Daniels
[removing the actual question]
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Peter T. Daniels
It was from the Second Series; the DVD price, as offered at the end
of
the
program, is as elevated as BBC DVDs are; do Phryne and Jack ever get
together,
or have they kept just making googly-eyes at each other for however
long
the
show has lasted? Collins (does he even have a first name?) and Dot
are
doing
much better on that front.
Apparently, she and Jack still had not married by the time she
disappeared during a trip to New Guinea in 1964, according to the
backstory given in the spinoff series "Ms. Fisher's Modern Murder
Mysteries" (2019).
Oy! I suppose we'll be getting those a few years from now.
Let's see, if Ms. Fisher is Miss Fisher's granddaughter or great-
grqanddaughter, who would the (great-)grandfather be? The intermediate
person(s) were either male or unmarried females ...
ObAUE: it could be "unmarried and female," or it could be "males and ..."
but neither of those seems right.
Peregrine Fisher is Miss Fisher's niece by a long-lost sister Annabel,
who pre-deceased the presumed dead Phryne. Evidently, she is her sole
surviving relation.
So Annabel Fisher also defied convention and either mothered out of wedlock
or didn't take her husband's name. If it's set in the present (i.e. 2019),
then Ms. Fisher would seem to be at least as old as Miss Marple was when
she made all her documentaries! (It's remarkable how much Miss Marple's
appearance changed between her various groups of documentaries -- sometimes
she looked like Margaret Rutherford, sometimes like Helen Hayes ...)
The Ms. Fisher mysteries are set in 1964. That's ov after Phryne
returned to Melbourne in the original mystery series.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
A similar problem is raised by Father Brown, who follows Miss Fisher on
ch. 21.2. He now appears to be in the early postwar years, although his
appearance and those of the supporting personages have not changed since
his earlier days that were dated, by the cars at least, 15 or so years
earlier.
Peter T. Daniels
2019-12-19 22:28:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Peter T. Daniels
[written yesterday]
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Peter T. Daniels
[removing the actual question]
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Peter T. Daniels
do Phryne and Jack ever get
together,
or have they kept just making googly-eyes at each other for however
long
the
show has lasted?
Apparently, she and Jack still had not married by the time she
disappeared during a trip to New Guinea in 1964, according to the
backstory given in the spinoff series "Ms. Fisher's Modern Murder
Mysteries" (2019).
Oy! I suppose we'll be getting those a few years from now.
Let's see, if Ms. Fisher is Miss Fisher's granddaughter or great-
grqanddaughter, who would the (great-)grandfather be? The intermediate
person(s) were either male or unmarried females ...
ObAUE: it could be "unmarried and female," or it could be "males and ..."
but neither of those seems right.
Peregrine Fisher is Miss Fisher's niece by a long-lost sister Annabel,
who pre-deceased the presumed dead Phryne. Evidently, she is her sole
surviving relation.
So Annabel Fisher also defied convention and either mothered out of wedlock
or didn't take her husband's name. If it's set in the present (i.e. 2019),
then Ms. Fisher would seem to be at least as old as Miss Marple was when
she made all her documentaries! (It's remarkable how much Miss Marple's
appearance changed between her various groups of documentaries -- sometimes
she looked like Margaret Rutherford, sometimes like Helen Hayes ...)
The Ms. Fisher mysteries are set in 1964. That's ov after Phryne
returned to Melbourne in the original mystery series.
ov?

Above you said Phryne "disappeared" in '64.
Horace LaBadie
2019-12-19 22:33:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Peter T. Daniels
[written yesterday]
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Peter T. Daniels
[removing the actual question]
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Peter T. Daniels
do Phryne and Jack ever get
together,
or have they kept just making googly-eyes at each other for however
long
the
show has lasted?
Apparently, she and Jack still had not married by the time she
disappeared during a trip to New Guinea in 1964, according to the
backstory given in the spinoff series "Ms. Fisher's Modern Murder
Mysteries" (2019).
Oy! I suppose we'll be getting those a few years from now.
Let's see, if Ms. Fisher is Miss Fisher's granddaughter or great-
grqanddaughter, who would the (great-)grandfather be? The intermediate
person(s) were either male or unmarried females ...
ObAUE: it could be "unmarried and female," or it could be "males and ..."
but neither of those seems right.
Peregrine Fisher is Miss Fisher's niece by a long-lost sister Annabel,
who pre-deceased the presumed dead Phryne. Evidently, she is her sole
surviving relation.
So Annabel Fisher also defied convention and either mothered out of wedlock
or didn't take her husband's name. If it's set in the present (i.e. 2019),
then Ms. Fisher would seem to be at least as old as Miss Marple was when
she made all her documentaries! (It's remarkable how much Miss Marple's
appearance changed between her various groups of documentaries -- sometimes
she looked like Margaret Rutherford, sometimes like Helen Hayes ...)
The Ms. Fisher mysteries are set in 1964. That's ov after Phryne
returned to Melbourne in the original mystery series.
ov?
Above you said Phryne "disappeared" in '64.
Yes. They searched, and all that was found of her in New Guinea was her
gold=played pistol.
Horace LaBadie
2019-12-19 16:27:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
[written yesterday]
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Peter T. Daniels
[removing the actual question]
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Peter T. Daniels
It was from the Second Series; the DVD price, as offered at the end
of
the
program, is as elevated as BBC DVDs are; do Phryne and Jack ever get
together,
or have they kept just making googly-eyes at each other for however
long
the
show has lasted? Collins (does he even have a first name?) and Dot
are
doing
much better on that front.
Apparently, she and Jack still had not married by the time she
disappeared during a trip to New Guinea in 1964, according to the
backstory given in the spinoff series "Ms. Fisher's Modern Murder
Mysteries" (2019).
Oy! I suppose we'll be getting those a few years from now.
Let's see, if Ms. Fisher is Miss Fisher's granddaughter or great-
grqanddaughter, who would the (great-)grandfather be? The intermediate
person(s) were either male or unmarried females ...
ObAUE: it could be "unmarried and female," or it could be "males and ..."
but neither of those seems right.
Peregrine Fisher is Miss Fisher's niece by a long-lost sister Annabel,
who pre-deceased the presumed dead Phryne. Evidently, she is her sole
surviving relation.
So Annabel Fisher also defied convention and either mothered out of wedlock
or didn't take her husband's name. If it's set in the present (i.e. 2019),
then Ms. Fisher would seem to be at least as old as Miss Marple was when
she made all her documentaries! (It's remarkable how much Miss Marple's
appearance changed between her various groups of documentaries -- sometimes
she looked like Margaret Rutherford, sometimes like Helen Hayes ...)
The Peregrine Fisher mysteries are set in 1964, about thirty-five years
after the original show.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
A similar problem is raised by Father Brown, who follows Miss Fisher on
ch. 21.2. He now appears to be in the early postwar years, although his
appearance and those of the supporting personages have not changed since
his earlier days that were dated, by the cars at least, 15 or so years
earlier.
Peter Young
2019-12-18 16:41:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
In last night's Miss Fisher's Murder Mysteries (from 2013), set in Melbourne,
Inspector Jack Robinson refers to a jewel thief who's been hitting salons
d'haute couture as having done the same at something like "Sydney up on the
North Shore," and I tried to picture what Sydney is on the northern shore
of; but then I supposed it might mean where the northern end of the Harbour
Bridge was or was about to be (the time seems to be fairly early in the
1920s). In that case, that side of Sydney Harbour must have been the posh
area? (One can't tell from the photographs whether the Opera House is at
the north or south end of the bridge.) (Or, for that matter, what compass
direction the bridge lies on.)
I'm sure Another Peter can elucidate a lot more than I can, but I've been
in Sydney visiting my elder daughter. The Opera House is East of the South
end of the bridge, on the East bank of Circular Quay, which is
rectangular. The Bridge lies a few degrees Eastward of South to North, and
North Shore seems to refer to the coastal land North of the Harbour.

Peter.
--
Peter Young, (BrE, RP), Consultant Anaesthetist, 1975-2004.
(US equivalent: Certified Anesthesiologist) (AUE Hg)
Cheltenham and Gloucester, UK. Now happily retired.
http://pnyoung.orpheusweb.co.uk
Kerr-Mudd,John
2019-12-18 17:48:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Young
Post by Peter T. Daniels
In last night's Miss Fisher's Murder Mysteries (from 2013), set in
Melbourne, Inspector Jack Robinson refers to a jewel thief who's been
hitting salons d'haute couture as having done the same at something
like "Sydney up on the North Shore," and I tried to picture what
Sydney is on the northern shore of; but then I supposed it might mean
where the northern end of the Harbour Bridge was or was about to be
(the time seems to be fairly early in the 1920s). In that case, that
side of Sydney Harbour must have been the posh area? (One can't tell
from the photographs whether the Opera House is at the north or south
end of the bridge.) (Or, for that matter, what compass direction the
bridge lies on.)
I'm sure Another Peter can elucidate a lot more than I can, but I've
been in Sydney visiting my elder daughter. The Opera House is East of
the South end of the bridge, on the East bank of Circular Quay, which
is rectangular. The Bridge lies a few degrees Eastward of South to
North, and North Shore seems to refer to the coastal land North of the
Harbour.
Peter.
Sounds about right. Actually it Rocks!

I guess the North Shore was posh 'cos you had to have a boat to get into
town (though I've been told it's desirable in Oz to have a North-facing
property to get the most sunshine - you gluttons!)
--
Bah, and indeed, Humbug.
Paul Wolff
2019-12-18 20:30:05 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 18 Dec 2019, at 18:48:43, "Kerr-Mudd,John"
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
Post by Peter Young
Post by Peter T. Daniels
In last night's Miss Fisher's Murder Mysteries (from 2013), set in
Melbourne, Inspector Jack Robinson refers to a jewel thief who's
been hitting salons d'haute couture as having done the same at
something like "Sydney up on the North Shore," and I tried to
picture what Sydney is on the northern shore of; but then I
supposed it might mean where the northern end of the Harbour Bridge
was or was about to be (the time seems to be fairly early in the
1920s). In that case, that side of Sydney Harbour must have been
the posh area? (One can't tell from the photographs whether the
Opera House is at the north or south end of the bridge.) (Or, for
that matter, what compass direction the bridge lies on.)
I'm sure Another Peter can elucidate a lot more than I can, but I've
been in Sydney visiting my elder daughter. The Opera House is East
of the South end of the bridge, on the East bank of Circular Quay,
which is rectangular. The Bridge lies a few degrees Eastward of
South to North, and North Shore seems to refer to the coastal land
North of the Harbour.
Sounds about right. Actually it Rocks!
It does indeed. The area to the west of the south end of the bridge is
The Rocks, as I imagine you knew.
I've had an over-priced James Squire's.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Malt_Shovel_Brewery
I'd settle for the Malt Shovel pub in Gaydon, for some R and R during a
visit to the British Motor Museum (vaut le détour). Besides, it's
several thousand miles closer.
--
Paul
Kerr-Mudd,John
2019-12-18 20:51:44 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 18 Dec 2019 20:30:05 GMT, Paul Wolff
<***@thiswontwork.wolff.co.uk> wrote:

[sorry]
Post by Paul Wolff
I'd settle for the Malt Shovel pub in Gaydon, for some R and R during a
visit to the British Motor Museum (vaut le détour). Besides, it's
several thousand miles closer.
I think I must have missed that, whilst fosse-icking in the area.
--
Bah, and indeed, Humbug.
Peter Moylan
2019-12-19 01:43:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
Post by Peter Young
Post by Peter T. Daniels
In last night's Miss Fisher's Murder Mysteries (from 2013), set
in Melbourne, Inspector Jack Robinson refers to a jewel thief
who's been hitting salons d'haute couture as having done the same
at something like "Sydney up on the North Shore," and I tried to
picture what Sydney is on the northern shore of; but then I
supposed it might mean where the northern end of the Harbour
Bridge was or was about to be (the time seems to be fairly early
in the 1920s). In that case, that side of Sydney Harbour must
have been the posh area? (One can't tell from the photographs
whether the Opera House is at the north or south end of the
bridge.) (Or, for that matter, what compass direction the bridge
lies on.)
I'm sure Another Peter can elucidate a lot more than I can, but
I've been in Sydney visiting my elder daughter. The Opera House is
East of the South end of the bridge, on the East bank of Circular
Quay, which is rectangular. The Bridge lies a few degrees Eastward
of South to North, and North Shore seems to refer to the coastal
land North of the Harbour.
Sounds about right. Actually it Rocks!
As others have mentioned, The Rocks is on the south side of the harbour.
So are a few other fashionable places: Darling Harbour, the Opera House,
the city centre, The Domain, and so on. So this is the area that a
visitor to Sydney would probably want to explore. This area is also
attractive to rich people who like inner-city living. But, for the most
part, the wealthy people live on the North Shore, which is the area
north of Sydney Harbour and within a few kilometres of the coast, with
plenty of trees for shade.

For those who know the San Francisco Bay area, the North Shore is the
Marin County of Sydney.
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
I guess the North Shore was posh 'cos you had to have a boat to get
into town (though I've been told it's desirable in Oz to have a
North-facing property to get the most sunshine - you gluttons!)
On the east coast of Australia, which is also where I live, the main
factors that make an area attractive are nearness to a beach, and height
above sea level. (I'm in an area that's neither rich nor poor, so I'm
only partway up the nearest hill, and about 20 minutes' drive from
beaches.) The height is desirable for sea breezes. Sydney's North Shore
is hilly enough and coastal enough to be popular.

The area was only lightly settled prior to the building of the Sydney
Harbour Bridge (1932), but some wealthy people would have lived there
then. By now you have not only the bridge, but plenty of ferries. For
tourists, I would recommend a ferry trip from Circular Quay (south
shore) to the zoo (north shore), or perhaps a longer ride from Darling
Harbour to Manly.

I'm not sure where that bit came from about north-facing properties. Of
course some part of the house will be on the north side, but we do our
best to avoid exposure to the northern and western sun. The western
exposure is in fact the biggest problem. At noon the sun is high so
shining mainly on the roof. Afternoon heat is worse because by then the
sun is lower and can shine through windows.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Kerr-Mudd,John
2019-12-19 10:55:10 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 19 Dec 2019 01:43:42 GMT, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
Post by Peter Young
Post by Peter T. Daniels
In last night's Miss Fisher's Murder Mysteries (from 2013), set
in Melbourne, Inspector Jack Robinson refers to a jewel thief
who's been hitting salons d'haute couture as having done the same
at something like "Sydney up on the North Shore," and I tried to
picture what Sydney is on the northern shore of; but then I
supposed it might mean where the northern end of the Harbour
Bridge was or was about to be (the time seems to be fairly early
in the 1920s). In that case, that side of Sydney Harbour must
have been the posh area? (One can't tell from the photographs
whether the Opera House is at the north or south end of the
bridge.) (Or, for that matter, what compass direction the bridge
lies on.)
I'm sure Another Peter can elucidate a lot more than I can, but
I've been in Sydney visiting my elder daughter. The Opera House is
East of the South end of the bridge, on the East bank of Circular
Quay, which is rectangular. The Bridge lies a few degrees Eastward
of South to North, and North Shore seems to refer to the coastal
land North of the Harbour.
Sounds about right. Actually it Rocks!
As others have mentioned, The Rocks is on the south side of the harbour.
So are a few other fashionable places: Darling Harbour, the Opera House,
the city centre, The Domain, and so on. So this is the area that a
visitor to Sydney would probably want to explore. This area is also
attractive to rich people who like inner-city living. But, for the most
part, the wealthy people live on the North Shore, which is the area
north of Sydney Harbour and within a few kilometres of the coast, with
plenty of trees for shade.
For those who know the San Francisco Bay area, the North Shore is the
Marin County of Sydney.
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
I guess the North Shore was posh 'cos you had to have a boat to get
into town (though I've been told it's desirable in Oz to have a
North-facing property to get the most sunshine - you gluttons!)
On the east coast of Australia, which is also where I live, the main
factors that make an area attractive are nearness to a beach, and height
above sea level. (I'm in an area that's neither rich nor poor, so I'm
only partway up the nearest hill, and about 20 minutes' drive from
beaches.) The height is desirable for sea breezes. Sydney's North Shore
is hilly enough and coastal enough to be popular.
The area was only lightly settled prior to the building of the Sydney
Harbour Bridge (1932), but some wealthy people would have lived there
then. By now you have not only the bridge, but plenty of ferries. For
tourists, I would recommend a ferry trip from Circular Quay (south
shore) to the zoo (north shore), or perhaps a longer ride from Darling
Harbour to Manly.
I'm not sure where that bit came from about north-facing properties. Of
course some part of the house will be on the north side, but we do our
best to avoid exposure to the northern and western sun. The western
exposure is in fact the biggest problem. At noon the sun is high so
shining mainly on the roof. Afternoon heat is worse because by then the
sun is lower and can shine through windows.
It may have been from a misguided Brit immigrant; in the UK Sth facing is
desirable as we get far less sunshine.
--
Bah, and indeed, Humbug.
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2019-12-19 13:47:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
On Thu, 19 Dec 2019 01:43:42 GMT, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
Post by Peter Young
Post by Peter T. Daniels
In last night's Miss Fisher's Murder Mysteries (from 2013), set
in Melbourne, Inspector Jack Robinson refers to a jewel thief
who's been hitting salons d'haute couture as having done the same
at something like "Sydney up on the North Shore," and I tried to
picture what Sydney is on the northern shore of; but then I
supposed it might mean where the northern end of the Harbour
Bridge was or was about to be (the time seems to be fairly early
in the 1920s). In that case, that side of Sydney Harbour must
have been the posh area? (One can't tell from the photographs
whether the Opera House is at the north or south end of the
bridge.) (Or, for that matter, what compass direction the bridge
lies on.)
I'm sure Another Peter can elucidate a lot more than I can, but
I've been in Sydney visiting my elder daughter. The Opera House is
East of the South end of the bridge, on the East bank of Circular
Quay, which is rectangular. The Bridge lies a few degrees Eastward
of South to North, and North Shore seems to refer to the coastal
land North of the Harbour.
Sounds about right. Actually it Rocks!
As others have mentioned, The Rocks is on the south side of the
harbour.
Post by Peter Moylan
So are a few other fashionable places: Darling Harbour, the Opera
House,
Post by Peter Moylan
the city centre, The Domain, and so on. So this is the area that a
visitor to Sydney would probably want to explore. This area is also
attractive to rich people who like inner-city living. But, for the most
part, the wealthy people live on the North Shore, which is the area
north of Sydney Harbour and within a few kilometres of the coast, with
plenty of trees for shade.
For those who know the San Francisco Bay area, the North Shore is the
Marin County of Sydney.
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
I guess the North Shore was posh 'cos you had to have a boat to get
into town (though I've been told it's desirable in Oz to have a
North-facing property to get the most sunshine - you gluttons!)
On the east coast of Australia, which is also where I live, the main
factors that make an area attractive are nearness to a beach, and
height
Post by Peter Moylan
above sea level. (I'm in an area that's neither rich nor poor, so I'm
only partway up the nearest hill, and about 20 minutes' drive from
beaches.) The height is desirable for sea breezes. Sydney's North Shore
is hilly enough and coastal enough to be popular.
The area was only lightly settled prior to the building of the Sydney
Harbour Bridge (1932), but some wealthy people would have lived there
then. By now you have not only the bridge, but plenty of ferries. For
tourists, I would recommend a ferry trip from Circular Quay (south
shore) to the zoo (north shore), or perhaps a longer ride from Darling
Harbour to Manly.
I'm not sure where that bit came from about north-facing properties. Of
course some part of the house will be on the north side, but we do our
best to avoid exposure to the northern and western sun. The western
exposure is in fact the biggest problem. At noon the sun is high so
shining mainly on the roof. Afternoon heat is worse because by then the
sun is lower and can shine through windows.
We had exactly that experience unto we moved our offices in 2000.
Before that we were in a location that looked nice and was indeed
pleasant in winter and summer. In spring and autumn, however, when
there was a lot of sun low in the sky, it was unbearable.
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
It may have been from a misguided Brit immigrant; in the UK Sth facing is
desirable as we get far less sunshine.
--
athel
Peter Moylan
2019-12-20 00:51:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
On Thu, 19 Dec 2019 01:43:42 GMT, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
I'm not sure where that bit came from about north-facing
properties. Of course some part of the house will be on the north
side, but we do our best to avoid exposure to the northern and
western sun. The western exposure is in fact the biggest problem.
At noon the sun is high so shining mainly on the roof. Afternoon
heat is worse because by then the sun is lower and can shine
through windows.
We had exactly that experience unto we moved our offices in 2000.
Before that we were in a location that looked nice and was indeed
pleasant in winter and summer. In spring and autumn, however, when
there was a lot of sun low in the sky, it was unbearable.
I have known people who had enough money to design their own houses, and
enough expertise to make them energy-efficient. One of the tricks that I
still retain in my memory is to design the eaves so that the sun is
excluded in summer, but enters the house in winter.

One such person, a professor of mechanical (or possibly civil)
engineering, went one step further and put a swimming pool inside the
house, near a large window. The pool acted as a heat reservoir. In
winter it was warmed by the sun. In summer the sun was excluded, and the
water helped to cool the house.

The traditional Australian house, which is now hard to find, had wide
verandahs on all sides, so that the house was shaded all day. In
favourable conditions the verandah was cooled by the wind. As houses
became more expensive, though, people started putting walls on the
verandahs to create extra rooms. That destroyed the original point.
Modern houses here still have eaves on all sides, but they're not wide
enough. The usual guard against the western sun is an external canvas blind.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Peter T. Daniels
2019-12-20 17:13:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
On Thu, 19 Dec 2019 01:43:42 GMT, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
I'm not sure where that bit came from about north-facing
properties. Of course some part of the house will be on the north
side, but we do our best to avoid exposure to the northern and
western sun. The western exposure is in fact the biggest problem.
At noon the sun is high so shining mainly on the roof. Afternoon
heat is worse because by then the sun is lower and can shine
through windows.
We had exactly that experience unto we moved our offices in 2000.
Before that we were in a location that looked nice and was indeed
pleasant in winter and summer. In spring and autumn, however, when
there was a lot of sun low in the sky, it was unbearable.
I have known people who had enough money to design their own houses, and
enough expertise to make them energy-efficient. One of the tricks that I
still retain in my memory is to design the eaves so that the sun is
excluded in summer, but enters the house in winter.
Apparently regularly used by Frank Lloyd Wright. It's a feature of the
Robie House that's pointed out in all the accounts.
Post by Peter Moylan
One such person, a professor of mechanical (or possibly civil)
engineering, went one step further and put a swimming pool inside the
house, near a large window. The pool acted as a heat reservoir. In
winter it was warmed by the sun. In summer the sun was excluded, and the
water helped to cool the house.
ISTR that FLlW did that too (or maybe one of his contemporaries). In
other words, your professor was a keen student of contemporary architecture.
Post by Peter Moylan
The traditional Australian house, which is now hard to find, had wide
verandahs on all sides, so that the house was shaded all day. In
favourable conditions the verandah was cooled by the wind. As houses
Perhaps a style imported from India?
Post by Peter Moylan
became more expensive, though, people started putting walls on the
verandahs to create extra rooms. That destroyed the original point.
Modern houses here still have eaves on all sides, but they're not wide
enough. The usual guard against the western sun is an external canvas blind.
Tony Cooper
2019-12-19 14:51:58 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 19 Dec 2019 10:55:10 -0000 (UTC), "Kerr-Mudd,John"
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
On Thu, 19 Dec 2019 01:43:42 GMT, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
Post by Peter Young
Post by Peter T. Daniels
In last night's Miss Fisher's Murder Mysteries (from 2013), set
in Melbourne, Inspector Jack Robinson refers to a jewel thief
who's been hitting salons d'haute couture as having done the same
at something like "Sydney up on the North Shore," and I tried to
picture what Sydney is on the northern shore of; but then I
supposed it might mean where the northern end of the Harbour
Bridge was or was about to be (the time seems to be fairly early
in the 1920s). In that case, that side of Sydney Harbour must
have been the posh area? (One can't tell from the photographs
whether the Opera House is at the north or south end of the
bridge.) (Or, for that matter, what compass direction the bridge
lies on.)
I'm sure Another Peter can elucidate a lot more than I can, but
I've been in Sydney visiting my elder daughter. The Opera House is
East of the South end of the bridge, on the East bank of Circular
Quay, which is rectangular. The Bridge lies a few degrees Eastward
of South to North, and North Shore seems to refer to the coastal
land North of the Harbour.
Sounds about right. Actually it Rocks!
As others have mentioned, The Rocks is on the south side of the
harbour.
Post by Peter Moylan
So are a few other fashionable places: Darling Harbour, the Opera
House,
Post by Peter Moylan
the city centre, The Domain, and so on. So this is the area that a
visitor to Sydney would probably want to explore. This area is also
attractive to rich people who like inner-city living. But, for the most
part, the wealthy people live on the North Shore, which is the area
north of Sydney Harbour and within a few kilometres of the coast, with
plenty of trees for shade.
For those who know the San Francisco Bay area, the North Shore is the
Marin County of Sydney.
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
I guess the North Shore was posh 'cos you had to have a boat to get
into town (though I've been told it's desirable in Oz to have a
North-facing property to get the most sunshine - you gluttons!)
On the east coast of Australia, which is also where I live, the main
factors that make an area attractive are nearness to a beach, and
height
Post by Peter Moylan
above sea level. (I'm in an area that's neither rich nor poor, so I'm
only partway up the nearest hill, and about 20 minutes' drive from
beaches.) The height is desirable for sea breezes. Sydney's North Shore
is hilly enough and coastal enough to be popular.
The area was only lightly settled prior to the building of the Sydney
Harbour Bridge (1932), but some wealthy people would have lived there
then. By now you have not only the bridge, but plenty of ferries. For
tourists, I would recommend a ferry trip from Circular Quay (south
shore) to the zoo (north shore), or perhaps a longer ride from Darling
Harbour to Manly.
I'm not sure where that bit came from about north-facing properties. Of
course some part of the house will be on the north side, but we do our
best to avoid exposure to the northern and western sun. The western
exposure is in fact the biggest problem. At noon the sun is high so
shining mainly on the roof. Afternoon heat is worse because by then the
sun is lower and can shine through windows.
It may have been from a misguided Brit immigrant; in the UK Sth facing is
desirable as we get far less sunshine.
I recently questioned my brother about something he'd written in an
email telling me that his wife had just rearranged the furniture for
the winter mode. He responded that the sunlight in the living room is
different in the winter, and the sofa and rug under it were moved so
the sunlight wouldn't fade the fabric.

I accepted his explanation, but in my visits to him in Denmark I never
saw enough sunlight to consider it a problem.

He also wrote that the "sofa board" was moved. Turns out that this
was a translation error. In Danish, a table is a "bord" and the sofa
bord is a low table placed in front of a sofa (or couch).

For those who don't know, my brother went to Denmark in 1969 as a
temporary move, but that has turned out to be a permanent move.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Lewis
2019-12-19 17:29:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tony Cooper
He also wrote that the "sofa board" was moved. Turns out that this
was a translation error. In Danish, a table is a "bord" and the sofa
bord is a low table placed in front of a sofa (or couch).
We have a sofa "board" (we call it the sofa high board, which is a
taller narrow table that sits behind the couch at about the level of the
top of the couch. It was supposed to be a convenient place for people in
the middle of the couch and at the end of the couch to put things, but
my wife has filled it with containers of crap that hasn't been touched
in half a decade.
--
Vampires are [...] by nature as co-operative as sharks. Vampyres are
just the same, the only real difference being that they can't
spell properly. --Carpe Jugulum
s***@gmail.com
2019-12-20 07:46:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lewis
We have a sofa "board" (we call it the sofa high board, which is a
taller narrow table that sits behind the couch at about the level of the
top of the couch. It was supposed to be a convenient place for people in
the middle of the couch and at the end of the couch to put things, but
my wife has filled it with containers of crap that hasn't been touched
in half a decade.
So instead of bending forward to put the cup/mug/paper-plate on the coffee table,
you were supposed to twist 120 degrees to reach above and behind you?

/dps "and where do the African Violets go?"
Lewis
2019-12-20 22:04:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by s***@gmail.com
Post by Lewis
We have a sofa "board" (we call it the sofa high board, which is a
taller narrow table that sits behind the couch at about the level of the
top of the couch. It was supposed to be a convenient place for people in
the middle of the couch and at the end of the couch
insert (WITHOUT A TABLE)
Post by s***@gmail.com
Post by Lewis
to put things, but
my wife has filled it with containers of crap that hasn't been touched
in half a decade.
So instead of bending forward to put the cup/mug/paper-plate on the coffee table,
you were supposed to twist 120 degrees to reach above and behind you?
Since there is no table in front, if you are in the middle of the couch
on on the end without a table, yes. Not that this happens much.

Well, not at all now.
--
Kickboxing. Sport of the future.
Rich Ulrich
2019-12-20 04:14:28 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 19 Dec 2019 09:51:58 -0500, Tony Cooper
Post by Tony Cooper
He also wrote that the "sofa board" was moved. Turns out that this
was a translation error. In Danish, a table is a "bord" and the sofa
bord is a low table placed in front of a sofa (or couch).
I've always called that a coffee table. Are there other terms?

I constructed a coffee table in woodshop when I was 17.
It occurs to me that I seldom read "coffee table" anywhere,
that I remember.

I wondered if the term was falling out of use, but Google-ngram
shows the opposite. While it has been rather more frequent in US
than UK, the usage in each increased 5-fold+ from 1965 to 2000.
--
Rich Ulrich
b***@shaw.ca
2019-12-20 04:21:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by Rich Ulrich
On Thu, 19 Dec 2019 09:51:58 -0500, Tony Cooper
Post by Tony Cooper
He also wrote that the "sofa board" was moved. Turns out that this
was a translation error. In Danish, a table is a "bord" and the sofa
bord is a low table placed in front of a sofa (or couch).
I've always called that a coffee table. Are there other terms?
I constructed a coffee table in woodshop when I was 17.
It occurs to me that I seldom read "coffee table" anywhere,
that I remember.
I wondered if the term was falling out of use, but Google-ngram
shows the opposite. While it has been rather more frequent in US
than UK, the usage in each increased 5-fold+ from 1965 to 2000.
I built a coffee table in shop in 1963, when I was 14. It was called
a coffee table then and it remains a coffee table now in CanE.
I researched buying a new one online not long ago and noted that
there are also end tables and side tables, but then tend to sit
at the end of a sofa or between living room chairs, while coffee
tables are always the central living room table.

bill
Mark Brader
2019-12-20 04:35:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by b***@shaw.ca
Post by Tony Cooper
In Danish, a table is a "bord" and the sofa
bord is a low table placed in front of a sofa (or couch).
I've always called that a coffee table...
It occurs to me that I seldom read "coffee table" anywhere,
that I remember.
I built a coffee table in shop in 1963, when I was 14. It was called
a coffee table then and it remains a coffee table now in CanE.
I researched buying a new one online not long ago and noted that
there are also end tables and side tables, but the[y] tend to sit
at the end of a sofa or between living room chairs, while coffee
tables are always the central living room table.
In my usage any low table designed to be used by people sitting in a
living-room chair or sofa/couch/chesterfield is a coffee table.
--
Mark Brader, Toronto | "UNIX ... the essential partner for
***@vex.net | eyespot or rynchosporium control in barley."
b***@shaw.ca
2019-12-20 06:44:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mark Brader
Post by b***@shaw.ca
Post by Tony Cooper
In Danish, a table is a "bord" and the sofa
bord is a low table placed in front of a sofa (or couch).
I've always called that a coffee table...
It occurs to me that I seldom read "coffee table" anywhere,
that I remember.
I built a coffee table in shop in 1963, when I was 14. It was called
a coffee table then and it remains a coffee table now in CanE.
I researched buying a new one online not long ago and noted that
there are also end tables and side tables, but the[y] tend to sit
at the end of a sofa or between living room chairs, while coffee
tables are always the central living room table.
In my usage any low table designed to be used by people sitting in a
living-room chair or sofa/couch/chesterfield is a coffee table.
Are you saying that you're not familiar with "side table" and "end table",
or do you consider them to be subcategories of "coffee table"?

I could understand the latter, but I can attest as a result of
hours of researching coffee table ads that "side table" and
"end table" are in use in Canadian English.

bill
Mark Brader
2019-12-20 08:05:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by b***@shaw.ca
Post by Mark Brader
In my usage any low table designed to be used by people sitting in a
living-room chair or sofa/couch/chesterfield is a coffee table.
Are you saying that you're not familiar with "side table" and "end table",
or do you consider them to be subcategories of "coffee table"?
Subcategories, yes.
--
Mark Brader, Toronto "These Millennia are like buses."
***@vex.net --Arwel Parry
Peter Moylan
2019-12-20 09:50:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by b***@shaw.ca
Post by Mark Brader
In my usage any low table designed to be used by people sitting in
a living-room chair or sofa/couch/chesterfield is a coffee table.
Are you saying that you're not familiar with "side table" and "end
table", or do you consider them to be subcategories of "coffee
table"?
I could understand the latter, but I can attest as a result of hours
of researching coffee table ads that "side table" and "end table" are
in use in Canadian English.
I had never heard of side tables or end tables, but a web search shows
some companies advertising them.

That won't influence my usage, though. I lost faith in the terminology
of furniture retailers when I walked into a furniture store and saw
something labelled a "chester draws".
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Sam Plusnet
2019-12-20 23:48:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by b***@shaw.ca
Post by Mark Brader
In my usage any low table designed to be used by people sitting in
a living-room chair or sofa/couch/chesterfield is a coffee table.
Are you saying that you're not familiar with "side table" and "end
table", or do you consider them to be subcategories of "coffee
table"?
I could understand the latter, but I can attest as a result of hours
of researching coffee table ads that "side table" and "end table" are
in use in Canadian English.
I had never heard of side tables or end tables, but a web search shows
some companies advertising them.
That won't influence my usage, though. I lost faith in the terminology
of furniture retailers when I walked into a furniture store and saw
something labelled a "chester draws".
That moment for us came when we saw a board outside a furniture shop
inviting us to go up to their first floor (BrE remember) to view their
"Lifestyle Concepts".
Upon inspection these turned out to be three piece suites.
--
Sam Plusnet
Peter Moylan
2019-12-20 05:03:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by b***@shaw.ca
I built a coffee table in shop in 1963, when I was 14. It was called
a coffee table then and it remains a coffee table now in CanE. I
researched buying a new one online not long ago and noted that there
are also end tables and side tables, but then tend to sit at the end
of a sofa or between living room chairs, while coffee tables are
always the central living room table.
For my own comfort, I prefer to have a coffee table at my right hand
when I'm sitting in a lounge chair, so in the past I've generally had
one between two chairs. Of course this depends on how the room is laid
out, and how many coffee tables you have, but in any case I use the name
"coffee table" for all such low tables.

A central coffee table is equally inconvenient for everyone - it
requires leaning forward to pick up and put down your cup - but in many
cases it's the best available solution. Still, I believe that it's best
to have several small coffee tables, if possible, and no central one.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2019-12-20 12:46:04 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 20 Dec 2019 16:03:03 +1100, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by b***@shaw.ca
I built a coffee table in shop in 1963, when I was 14. It was called
a coffee table then and it remains a coffee table now in CanE. I
researched buying a new one online not long ago and noted that there
are also end tables and side tables, but then tend to sit at the end
of a sofa or between living room chairs, while coffee tables are
always the central living room table.
For my own comfort, I prefer to have a coffee table at my right hand
when I'm sitting in a lounge chair, so in the past I've generally had
one between two chairs. Of course this depends on how the room is laid
out, and how many coffee tables you have, but in any case I use the name
"coffee table" for all such low tables.
A central coffee table is equally inconvenient for everyone - it
requires leaning forward to pick up and put down your cup - but in many
cases it's the best available solution. Still, I believe that it's best
to have several small coffee tables, if possible, and no central one.
Shirley a coffee table needs to be large enough to hold at least one
coffee-table book as well as coffee cups?
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Peter Moylan
2019-12-20 14:49:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Fri, 20 Dec 2019 16:03:03 +1100, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
A central coffee table is equally inconvenient for everyone - it
requires leaning forward to pick up and put down your cup - but in
many cases it's the best available solution. Still, I believe that
it's best to have several small coffee tables, if possible, and no
central one.
Shirley a coffee table needs to be large enough to hold at least one
coffee-table book as well as coffee cups?
I trust that AUE regulars are sufficiently cultured to have no
coffee-table books.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Tony Cooper
2019-12-20 15:20:04 UTC
Permalink
On Sat, 21 Dec 2019 01:49:28 +1100, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Fri, 20 Dec 2019 16:03:03 +1100, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
A central coffee table is equally inconvenient for everyone - it
requires leaning forward to pick up and put down your cup - but in
many cases it's the best available solution. Still, I believe that
it's best to have several small coffee tables, if possible, and no
central one.
Shirley a coffee table needs to be large enough to hold at least one
coffee-table book as well as coffee cups?
I trust that AUE regulars are sufficiently cultured to have no
coffee-table books.
Not all. We know that at least one here has some coffee table books
that are so large that they will not fit on a scanner.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Katy Jennison
2019-12-20 15:34:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tony Cooper
On Sat, 21 Dec 2019 01:49:28 +1100, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Fri, 20 Dec 2019 16:03:03 +1100, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
A central coffee table is equally inconvenient for everyone - it
requires leaning forward to pick up and put down your cup - but in
many cases it's the best available solution. Still, I believe that
it's best to have several small coffee tables, if possible, and no
central one.
Shirley a coffee table needs to be large enough to hold at least one
coffee-table book as well as coffee cups?
I trust that AUE regulars are sufficiently cultured to have no
coffee-table books.
Not all. We know that at least one here has some coffee table books
that are so large that they will not fit on a scanner.
Never mind a scanner, most of them are too big for most bookshelves,
too. What is one to do, when well-meaning relatives give them as
Christmas presents?
--
Katy Jennison
Peter T. Daniels
2019-12-20 17:22:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by Katy Jennison
Post by Tony Cooper
On Sat, 21 Dec 2019 01:49:28 +1100, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Shirley a coffee table needs to be large enough to hold at least one
coffee-table book as well as coffee cups?
I trust that AUE regulars are sufficiently cultured to have no
coffee-table books.
Not all. We know that at least one here has some coffee table books
that are so large that they will not fit on a scanner.
Never mind a scanner, most of them are too big for most bookshelves,
too. What is one to do, when well-meaning relatives give them as
Christmas presents?
As Martha Stewart said to Colbert this week, Regift.
Paul Wolff
2019-12-20 17:23:07 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 20 Dec 2019, at 15:34:05, Katy Jennison
Post by Katy Jennison
Post by Tony Cooper
On Sat, 21 Dec 2019 01:49:28 +1100, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Fri, 20 Dec 2019 16:03:03 +1100, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
A central coffee table is equally inconvenient for everyone - it
requires leaning forward to pick up and put down your cup - but in
many cases it's the best available solution. Still, I believe that
it's best to have several small coffee tables, if possible, and no
central one.
Shirley a coffee table needs to be large enough to hold at least one
coffee-table book as well as coffee cups?
I trust that AUE regulars are sufficiently cultured to have no
coffee-table books.
Not all. We know that at least one here has some coffee table books
that are so large that they will not fit on a scanner.
Never mind a scanner, most of them are too big for most bookshelves,
too. What is one to do, when well-meaning relatives give them as
Christmas presents?
Well, suppose your W-MR gives you an old copy of, say, Birds of America
this year, just cut your favourite pictures out and get them framed to
hang on a wall somewhere, or the back of the loo door.
--
Paul
charles
2019-12-20 16:09:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tony Cooper
On Sat, 21 Dec 2019 01:49:28 +1100, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Fri, 20 Dec 2019 16:03:03 +1100, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
A central coffee table is equally inconvenient for everyone - it
requires leaning forward to pick up and put down your cup - but in
many cases it's the best available solution. Still, I believe that
it's best to have several small coffee tables, if possible, and no
central one.
Shirley a coffee table needs to be large enough to hold at least one
coffee-table book as well as coffee cups?
I trust that AUE regulars are sufficiently cultured to have no
coffee-table books.
Not all. We know that at least one here has some coffee table books
that are so large that they will not fit on a scanner.
Excuse me - I have an A3 scanner.
--
from KT24 in Surrey, England
"I'd rather die of exhaustion than die of boredom" Thomas Carlyle
Peter T. Daniels
2019-12-20 17:21:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tony Cooper
On Sat, 21 Dec 2019 01:49:28 +1100, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Fri, 20 Dec 2019 16:03:03 +1100, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
A central coffee table is equally inconvenient for everyone - it
requires leaning forward to pick up and put down your cup - but in
many cases it's the best available solution. Still, I believe that
it's best to have several small coffee tables, if possible, and no
central one.
Shirley a coffee table needs to be large enough to hold at least one
coffee-table book as well as coffee cups?
I trust that AUE regulars are sufficiently cultured to have no
coffee-table books.
Not all. We know that at least one here has some coffee table books
that are so large that they will not fit on a scanner.
Hmm, about whom could the Great Anonymizer be fabricating now?

The art books too large for the scanner are kept on shelves (set far
enough apart to accommodate them). Yet another failure of imagination
of the one who will go to any lengths to try to fabricate an insult.
Kerr-Mudd,John
2019-12-20 17:32:22 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 20 Dec 2019 14:49:28 GMT, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Fri, 20 Dec 2019 16:03:03 +1100, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
A central coffee table is equally inconvenient for everyone - it
requires leaning forward to pick up and put down your cup - but in
many cases it's the best available solution. Still, I believe that
it's best to have several small coffee tables, if possible, and no
central one.
Shirley a coffee table needs to be large enough to hold at least one
coffee-table book as well as coffee cups?
I trust that AUE regulars are sufficiently cultured to have no
coffee-table books.
I have a coffee-table book ; it's stained with coffee; does this count?
--
Bah, and indeed, Humbug.
Joy Beeson
2019-12-21 04:30:57 UTC
Permalink
On Sat, 21 Dec 2019 01:49:28 +1100, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
I trust that AUE regulars are sufficiently cultured to have no
coffee-table books.
I have lots of books on my coffee table, but my coffee-table book is
in the cookbook commode in the kitchen.

It was part of a door prize at Taste of Kosciusko.
--
Joy Beeson, U.S.A., mostly central Hoosier,
some Northern Indiana, Upstate New York, Florida, and Hawaii
joy beeson at comcast dot net http://wlweather.net/PAGEJOY/
The above message is a Usenet post.
Lewis
2019-12-21 05:37:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tony Cooper
On Sat, 21 Dec 2019 01:49:28 +1100, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
I trust that AUE regulars are sufficiently cultured to have no
coffee-table books.
I have lots of books on my coffee table, but my coffee-table book is
in the cookbook commode in the kitchen.
You keep cookbooks in a commode?

Is there some other meaning of commode that my dictionary is unfamiliar
with?
--
'I cannot! He has been kindness itself to me!' 'And you can be Death
itself to him.'
b***@shaw.ca
2019-12-21 05:43:51 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lewis
Post by Tony Cooper
On Sat, 21 Dec 2019 01:49:28 +1100, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
I trust that AUE regulars are sufficiently cultured to have no
coffee-table books.
I have lots of books on my coffee table, but my coffee-table book is
in the cookbook commode in the kitchen.
You keep cookbooks in a commode?
Is there some other meaning of commode that my dictionary is unfamiliar
with?
The first definition of "commode" in my little Oxford is "a chest of drawers".
The one with the chamber pot in a little cupboard follows.

bill
Sam Plusnet
2019-12-21 18:31:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by b***@shaw.ca
Post by Lewis
Post by Tony Cooper
On Sat, 21 Dec 2019 01:49:28 +1100, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
I trust that AUE regulars are sufficiently cultured to have no
coffee-table books.
I have lots of books on my coffee table, but my coffee-table book is
in the cookbook commode in the kitchen.
You keep cookbooks in a commode?
Is there some other meaning of commode that my dictionary is unfamiliar
with?
The first definition of "commode" in my little Oxford is "a chest of drawers".
The one with the chamber pot in a little cupboard follows.
The OED has
1. A tall head-dress fashionable with women in the last third of the
17th and first third of the 18th centuries, consisting of a wire
frame-work variously covered with silk or lace; sometimes with streaming
lappets which hung over the shoulders.

2. A procuress, bawd. Obs.

3. A piece of furniture with drawers and shelves; in the bedroom, a sort
of elaborate chest of drawers (so in Fr.); in the drawingroom, a large
(and gen. old-fashioned) kind of chiffonier.

4. A small article of furniture enclosing a chamber utensil; a close-stool.

5. attrib. and Comb., as commode box.

(5 seems to relate to meaning 1, rather than 4)
--
Sam Plusnet
Tony Cooper
2019-12-21 21:56:02 UTC
Permalink
On Sat, 21 Dec 2019 20:07:43 -0000 (UTC), Lewis
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by b***@shaw.ca
Post by Lewis
Post by Tony Cooper
On Sat, 21 Dec 2019 01:49:28 +1100, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
I trust that AUE regulars are sufficiently cultured to have no
coffee-table books.
I have lots of books on my coffee table, but my coffee-table book is
in the cookbook commode in the kitchen.
You keep cookbooks in a commode?
Is there some other meaning of commode that my dictionary is unfamiliar
with?
The first definition of "commode" in my little Oxford is "a chest of drawers".
The one with the chamber pot in a little cupboard follows.
The OED has
1. A tall head-dress fashionable with women in the last third of the
17th and first third of the 18th centuries, consisting of a wire
frame-work variously covered with silk or lace; sometimes with streaming
lappets which hung over the shoulders.
2. A procuress, bawd. Obs.
3. A piece of furniture with drawers and shelves; in the bedroom, a sort
of elaborate chest of drawers (so in Fr.); in the drawingroom, a large
(and gen. old-fashioned) kind of chiffonier.
4. A small article of furniture enclosing a chamber utensil; a close-stool.
5. attrib. and Comb., as commode box.
(5 seems to relate to meaning 1, rather than 4)
commode | k??m??d |
noun
1 a piece of furniture containing a concealed chamber pot.
• North American a toilet.
• North American historical a movable washstand.
2 a chest of drawers or chiffonier of a decorative type popular in the 18th century.
I have never heard it used in sense 2, and in the washstand sense I
would assume it was a washstand with a chamberpot.
Well, it's cabinet in which a chamberpot can placed, and some versions
had a washstand top. The chamberpot was usually placed under the bed
at night, and then put in the commode in the morning to be stored
during the day.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2019-12-21 23:35:00 UTC
Permalink
On Sat, 21 Dec 2019 16:56:02 -0500, Tony Cooper
Post by Tony Cooper
On Sat, 21 Dec 2019 20:07:43 -0000 (UTC), Lewis
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by b***@shaw.ca
Post by Lewis
Post by Tony Cooper
On Sat, 21 Dec 2019 01:49:28 +1100, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
I trust that AUE regulars are sufficiently cultured to have no
coffee-table books.
I have lots of books on my coffee table, but my coffee-table book is
in the cookbook commode in the kitchen.
You keep cookbooks in a commode?
Is there some other meaning of commode that my dictionary is unfamiliar
with?
The first definition of "commode" in my little Oxford is "a chest of drawers".
The one with the chamber pot in a little cupboard follows.
The OED has
1. A tall head-dress fashionable with women in the last third of the
17th and first third of the 18th centuries, consisting of a wire
frame-work variously covered with silk or lace; sometimes with streaming
lappets which hung over the shoulders.
2. A procuress, bawd. Obs.
3. A piece of furniture with drawers and shelves; in the bedroom, a sort
of elaborate chest of drawers (so in Fr.); in the drawingroom, a large
(and gen. old-fashioned) kind of chiffonier.
4. A small article of furniture enclosing a chamber utensil; a close-stool.
5. attrib. and Comb., as commode box.
(5 seems to relate to meaning 1, rather than 4)
commode | k??m??d |
noun
1 a piece of furniture containing a concealed chamber pot.
• North American a toilet.
• North American historical a movable washstand.
2 a chest of drawers or chiffonier of a decorative type popular in the 18th century.
I have never heard it used in sense 2, and in the washstand sense I
would assume it was a washstand with a chamberpot.
Well, it's cabinet in which a chamberpot can placed, and some versions
had a washstand top. The chamberpot was usually placed under the bed
at night, and then put in the commode in the morning to be stored
during the day.
I'm finding this thread ineresting, because the only type of commode
that I have heard of or seen is the toilet variety: a seat containing a
concealed chamber pot.
Like this Victorian one:
https://www.sellingantiques.co.uk/144893/victorian-mahogany-scroll-armed-commode-chair/

More modern styles are available, such as:
https://www.careco.co.uk/item-p-ba05034/exmouth-luxury-commode/
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Tony Cooper
2019-12-22 01:06:54 UTC
Permalink
On Sat, 21 Dec 2019 23:35:00 +0000, "Peter Duncanson [BrE]"
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Sat, 21 Dec 2019 16:56:02 -0500, Tony Cooper
Post by Tony Cooper
On Sat, 21 Dec 2019 20:07:43 -0000 (UTC), Lewis
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by b***@shaw.ca
Post by Lewis
Post by Tony Cooper
On Sat, 21 Dec 2019 01:49:28 +1100, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
I trust that AUE regulars are sufficiently cultured to have no
coffee-table books.
I have lots of books on my coffee table, but my coffee-table book is
in the cookbook commode in the kitchen.
You keep cookbooks in a commode?
Is there some other meaning of commode that my dictionary is unfamiliar
with?
The first definition of "commode" in my little Oxford is "a chest of drawers".
The one with the chamber pot in a little cupboard follows.
The OED has
1. A tall head-dress fashionable with women in the last third of the
17th and first third of the 18th centuries, consisting of a wire
frame-work variously covered with silk or lace; sometimes with streaming
lappets which hung over the shoulders.
2. A procuress, bawd. Obs.
3. A piece of furniture with drawers and shelves; in the bedroom, a sort
of elaborate chest of drawers (so in Fr.); in the drawingroom, a large
(and gen. old-fashioned) kind of chiffonier.
4. A small article of furniture enclosing a chamber utensil; a close-stool.
5. attrib. and Comb., as commode box.
(5 seems to relate to meaning 1, rather than 4)
commode | k??m??d |
noun
1 a piece of furniture containing a concealed chamber pot.
• North American a toilet.
• North American historical a movable washstand.
2 a chest of drawers or chiffonier of a decorative type popular in the 18th century.
I have never heard it used in sense 2, and in the washstand sense I
would assume it was a washstand with a chamberpot.
Well, it's cabinet in which a chamberpot can placed, and some versions
had a washstand top. The chamberpot was usually placed under the bed
at night, and then put in the commode in the morning to be stored
during the day.
I'm finding this thread ineresting, because the only type of commode
that I have heard of or seen is the toilet variety: a seat containing a
concealed chamber pot.
https://www.sellingantiques.co.uk/144893/victorian-mahogany-scroll-armed-commode-chair/
https://www.careco.co.uk/item-p-ba05034/exmouth-luxury-commode/
There are several different styles of commode, and the ones in which
the person sat on the commode with the chamberpot underneath, are just
one of the styles.

I said I wouldn't mind having an antique commode in our kitchen, but
would not buy one with that "feature" in the design.

The style in which the chamberpot was stored would be acceptable. The
chamberpot would have been emptied and cleaned before it was stored in
cabinet.

The style in your link is more associated with the aged and infirm
user...the person who was room-bound. Chamberpots were a normal part
of life for everyone in the days before indoor plumbing. It was a
long, cold walk to the privy on winter nights
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2019-12-22 15:16:22 UTC
Permalink
On Sat, 21 Dec 2019 20:06:54 -0500, Tony Cooper
Post by Tony Cooper
On Sat, 21 Dec 2019 23:35:00 +0000, "Peter Duncanson [BrE]"
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Sat, 21 Dec 2019 16:56:02 -0500, Tony Cooper
Post by Tony Cooper
On Sat, 21 Dec 2019 20:07:43 -0000 (UTC), Lewis
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by b***@shaw.ca
Post by Lewis
Post by Tony Cooper
On Sat, 21 Dec 2019 01:49:28 +1100, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
I trust that AUE regulars are sufficiently cultured to have no
coffee-table books.
I have lots of books on my coffee table, but my coffee-table book is
in the cookbook commode in the kitchen.
You keep cookbooks in a commode?
Is there some other meaning of commode that my dictionary is unfamiliar
with?
The first definition of "commode" in my little Oxford is "a chest of drawers".
The one with the chamber pot in a little cupboard follows.
The OED has
1. A tall head-dress fashionable with women in the last third of the
17th and first third of the 18th centuries, consisting of a wire
frame-work variously covered with silk or lace; sometimes with streaming
lappets which hung over the shoulders.
2. A procuress, bawd. Obs.
3. A piece of furniture with drawers and shelves; in the bedroom, a sort
of elaborate chest of drawers (so in Fr.); in the drawingroom, a large
(and gen. old-fashioned) kind of chiffonier.
4. A small article of furniture enclosing a chamber utensil; a close-stool.
5. attrib. and Comb., as commode box.
(5 seems to relate to meaning 1, rather than 4)
commode | k??m??d |
noun
1 a piece of furniture containing a concealed chamber pot.
• North American a toilet.
• North American historical a movable washstand.
2 a chest of drawers or chiffonier of a decorative type popular in the 18th century.
I have never heard it used in sense 2, and in the washstand sense I
would assume it was a washstand with a chamberpot.
Well, it's cabinet in which a chamberpot can placed, and some versions
had a washstand top. The chamberpot was usually placed under the bed
at night, and then put in the commode in the morning to be stored
during the day.
I'm finding this thread ineresting, because the only type of commode
that I have heard of or seen is the toilet variety: a seat containing a
concealed chamber pot.
https://www.sellingantiques.co.uk/144893/victorian-mahogany-scroll-armed-commode-chair/
https://www.careco.co.uk/item-p-ba05034/exmouth-luxury-commode/
There are several different styles of commode, and the ones in which
the person sat on the commode with the chamberpot underneath, are just
one of the styles.
I said I wouldn't mind having an antique commode in our kitchen, but
would not buy one with that "feature" in the design.
The style in which the chamberpot was stored would be acceptable. The
chamberpot would have been emptied and cleaned before it was stored in
cabinet.
The style in your link is more associated with the aged and infirm
user...the person who was room-bound. Chamberpots were a normal part
of life for everyone in the days before indoor plumbing. It was a
long, cold walk to the privy on winter nights
In my experience chamber pots were still in use after indoor plumbing
arrived. A chamber pot was typically stored under the bed just in case
it was needed.
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Cheryl
2019-12-22 17:03:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Sat, 21 Dec 2019 20:06:54 -0500, Tony Cooper
Post by Tony Cooper
The style in your link is more associated with the aged and infirm
user...the person who was room-bound. Chamberpots were a normal part
of life for everyone in the days before indoor plumbing. It was a
long, cold walk to the privy on winter nights
In my experience chamber pots were still in use after indoor plumbing
arrived. A chamber pot was typically stored under the bed just in case
it was needed.
Or it was stored on an elegant little cabinet and displayed as an
antique, in which case you were NOT supposed to use it, or to use the
matching basin that accompanied it.
--
Cheryl
Lewis
2019-12-22 06:04:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tony Cooper
On Sat, 21 Dec 2019 20:07:43 -0000 (UTC), Lewis
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by b***@shaw.ca
Post by Lewis
Post by Tony Cooper
On Sat, 21 Dec 2019 01:49:28 +1100, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
I trust that AUE regulars are sufficiently cultured to have no
coffee-table books.
I have lots of books on my coffee table, but my coffee-table book is
in the cookbook commode in the kitchen.
You keep cookbooks in a commode?
Is there some other meaning of commode that my dictionary is unfamiliar
with?
The first definition of "commode" in my little Oxford is "a chest of drawers".
The one with the chamber pot in a little cupboard follows.
The OED has
1. A tall head-dress fashionable with women in the last third of the
17th and first third of the 18th centuries, consisting of a wire
frame-work variously covered with silk or lace; sometimes with streaming
lappets which hung over the shoulders.
2. A procuress, bawd. Obs.
3. A piece of furniture with drawers and shelves; in the bedroom, a sort
of elaborate chest of drawers (so in Fr.); in the drawingroom, a large
(and gen. old-fashioned) kind of chiffonier.
4. A small article of furniture enclosing a chamber utensil; a close-stool.
5. attrib. and Comb., as commode box.
(5 seems to relate to meaning 1, rather than 4)
commode | k??m??d |
noun
1 a piece of furniture containing a concealed chamber pot.
• North American a toilet.
• North American historical a movable washstand.
2 a chest of drawers or chiffonier of a decorative type popular in the 18th century.
I have never heard it used in sense 2, and in the washstand sense I
would assume it was a washstand with a chamberpot.
Well, it's cabinet in which a chamberpot can placed, and some versions
had a washstand top. The chamberpot was usually placed under the bed
at night, and then put in the commode in the morning to be stored
during the day.
No, I am saying the most common use of "commode" is to refer to the
porcelain toilet. On rare occasions it is used to mean a cabinet for a
chamberpot, but no one uses chamberpots, so that use is very rare.

<https://www.google.com/search?q=commode&tbm=isch>
<Loading Image...
--
'They come back to the mountains to die,' said the King. 'They live
in Ankh-Morpork.' --The Fifth Elephant
Tony Cooper
2019-12-22 06:12:09 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 22 Dec 2019 06:04:09 -0000 (UTC), Lewis
Post by Lewis
Post by Tony Cooper
Well, it's cabinet in which a chamberpot can placed, and some versions
had a washstand top. The chamberpot was usually placed under the bed
at night, and then put in the commode in the morning to be stored
during the day.
No, I am saying the most common use of "commode" is to refer to the
porcelain toilet. On rare occasions it is used to mean a cabinet for a
chamberpot, but no one uses chamberpots, so that use is very rare.
<https://www.google.com/search?q=commode&tbm=isch>
<https://www.dropbox.com/s/dnslg2ztx91gfsy/Screenshot%202019-12-21%2023.03.28.png?dl=0>
It may be rare in general conversation, but anyone interested in
antique furniture wouldn't consider it rare.

I've used the word to mean the cabinet, but I don't think I've ever
used "commode" to refer to a toilet. I do know the use, but don't use
it.

So my sense of what is rare is the reverse of yours.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2019-12-22 06:33:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tony Cooper
On Sat, 21 Dec 2019 20:07:43 -0000 (UTC), Lewis
[ … ]
commode | k??m??d |
noun
1 a piece of furniture containing a concealed chamber pot.
• North American a toilet.
• North American historical a movable washstand.
2 a chest of drawers or chiffonier of a decorative type popular in the 18th century.
I have never heard it used in sense 2, and in the washstand sense I
would assume it was a washstand with a chamberpot.
Well, it's cabinet in which a chamberpot can placed, and some versions
had a washstand top. The chamberpot was usually placed under the bed
at night, and then put in the commode in the morning to be stored
during the day.
An example of a transfer of meaning from one word to another: in my
youth, when chamber pots were common, but "chamber" was not much used
with its primary meaning, the pot was sometimes called a chamber.
--
athel
Peter Moylan
2019-12-22 06:41:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
An example of a transfer of meaning from one word to another: in my
youth, when chamber pots were common, but "chamber" was not much used
with its primary meaning, the pot was sometimes called a chamber.
This thread is calling to mind a traumatic experience in my early years.

I was staying with my grandparents at the time. One night I fell out of
bed, somehow rolled under the bed, and ended up with my head in the
gazunda. And it wasn't empty.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2019-12-22 07:29:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
An example of a transfer of meaning from one word to another: in my
youth, when chamber pots were common, but "chamber" was not much used
with its primary meaning, the pot was sometimes called a chamber.
This thread is calling to mind a traumatic experience in my early years.
I was staying with my grandparents at the time. One night I fell out of
bed, somehow rolled under the bed, and ended up with my head in the
gazunda. And it wasn't empty.
I'm reminded of an embarrassng occasion when I was a teenager. I was
staying with my aunt and in the middle of the night I had a strong need
for a pee. Unfortunately I couldn't find the light switch, and as this
was in a rural village there was no stray light from the urban lights
and dark meant dark. Eventually I decided to pee out of the window onto
the garden outside. Unfortunately there was a gravel drive underneath
and there was a great deal of noise. It woke up my uncle who wanted to
know what was happening. I said I had fallen out of bed (though that
would have made a quite different sort of noise). I don't suppose he
believed me, but anyway, there were no repercussions.
--
athel
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2019-12-22 15:31:47 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 22 Dec 2019 17:41:12 +1100, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
An example of a transfer of meaning from one word to another: in my
youth, when chamber pots were common, but "chamber" was not much used
with its primary meaning, the pot was sometimes called a chamber.
This thread is calling to mind a traumatic experience in my early years.
I was staying with my grandparents at the time. One night I fell out of
bed, somehow rolled under the bed, and ended up with my head in the
gazunda. And it wasn't empty.
I've known the word "gazunda" for a chamber pot for a long time. It
doesn't seem to have got into online dictionaries.

Dictionaries have the similarly pronounced word "gazunder" which has a
totally different meaning:
https://www.dictionary.com/browse/gazunder

gazunder
/ (g?'z?nd?) British /
verb
to reduce an offer on a property immediately before exchanging
contracts, having previously agreed a higher price with (the seller)

A chamber pot is, of course, called a gazunda because it "goes under" a
bed.

I see that the Urban Dictionary has an entry for "gazunder" including
the chamber pot meaning as well as the above:
https://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=gazunder

gazunder
A chamber pot for the collection of faeces and urine, so called
because it gazunder the bed

Also from that page:

A term used (especially in proffesional kitchen) to desribe a small
spatula, or narrow fishslice. They are often slotted.
they are so called because it "gez under" (goes under) things.
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Katy Jennison
2019-12-22 17:17:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Dictionaries have the similarly pronounced word "gazunder" which has a
https://www.dictionary.com/browse/gazunder
gazunder
/ (g?'z?nd?) British /
verb
to reduce an offer on a property immediately before exchanging
contracts, having previously agreed a higher price with (the seller)
Funny, I always knew that term as 'gazump'. 'gazumping' was common
practice during the buoyant property market of the latr '80s in the UK.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gazumping
Not the same thing. To gazump is to step in with a higher offer when
another buyer is on the point of signing a contract. If the seller
accepts the new offer the earlier buyer loses all the time and money
spent thus far (on surveys, solicitors, etc): the potential first buyer
is the loser. In a gazunder (see the definition above), the seller
either has to agree the lower price or to re-advertise, losing time and
money: the seller in this case is the one who loses.
--
Katy Jennison
Mack A. Damia
2019-12-22 13:10:24 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 22 Dec 2019 07:33:17 +0100, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Tony Cooper
On Sat, 21 Dec 2019 20:07:43 -0000 (UTC), Lewis
[ … ]
commode | k??m??d |
noun
1 a piece of furniture containing a concealed chamber pot.
? North American a toilet.
? North American historical a movable washstand.
2 a chest of drawers or chiffonier of a decorative type popular in the 18th century.
I have never heard it used in sense 2, and in the washstand sense I
would assume it was a washstand with a chamberpot.
Well, it's cabinet in which a chamberpot can placed, and some versions
had a washstand top. The chamberpot was usually placed under the bed
at night, and then put in the commode in the morning to be stored
during the day.
An example of a transfer of meaning from one word to another: in my
youth, when chamber pots were common, but "chamber" was not much used
with its primary meaning, the pot was sometimes called a chamber.
Jerry's under't bed.
Joy Beeson
2019-12-22 04:34:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by b***@shaw.ca
The first definition of "commode" in my little Oxford is "a chest of drawers".
The one with the chamber pot in a little cupboard follows.
Mine was a wash stand in its youth.

Grandma had a similar commode in her kitchen, with an enamel bucket of
water and a wash basin on top, and a slop bucket on the floor behind
the doors. Mine lost the towel rack before I got it, and someone put
plywood in to make a floor for the slop-jar compartment. I keep small
cookbooks in the towel-and-washcloth drawers, large cookbooks and the
autograph tablecloth in the slop-bucket compartment, and a microwave
oven on top.

Grandma's chamber pot was stored under their bed, not in a washstand.
After she moved into a house with running water, I noticed a
purely-ornamental chamber pot with a crocheted-lace cover on its lid
under the guest bed. I don't know whether it was the same one I was
once asked to empty.

Grandpa had an automatic razor stropper to the left of the wash stand
-- you put a razor blade in a holder, then pulled the handles on the
ends of the strop alternately, and the blade was turned back and forth
to be stropped in the correct direction, on one side when you pulled
one handle, and on the other side when you pulled the other.
--
Joy Beeson, U.S.A., mostly central Hoosier,
some Northern Indiana, Upstate New York, Florida, and Hawaii
joy beeson at comcast dot net http://wlweather.net/PAGEJOY/
The above message is a Usenet post.
Tony Cooper
2019-12-22 06:07:54 UTC
Permalink
On Sat, 21 Dec 2019 23:34:43 -0500, Joy Beeson
Post by Joy Beeson
Post by b***@shaw.ca
The first definition of "commode" in my little Oxford is "a chest of drawers".
The one with the chamber pot in a little cupboard follows.
Mine was a wash stand in its youth.
Grandma had a similar commode in her kitchen, with an enamel bucket of
water and a wash basin on top, and a slop bucket on the floor behind
the doors. Mine lost the towel rack before I got it, and someone put
plywood in to make a floor for the slop-jar compartment.
That may need explanation for some. Many of those cabinets had a hole
cut in the floor of the bottom compartment so the "slop-jar" or
"chamber pot" would fit halfway or so into the hole. This was to
prevent it from tipping over.


I keep small
Post by Joy Beeson
cookbooks in the towel-and-washcloth drawers, large cookbooks and the
autograph tablecloth in the slop-bucket compartment, and a microwave
oven on top.
Grandma's chamber pot was stored under their bed, not in a washstand.
After she moved into a house with running water, I noticed a
purely-ornamental chamber pot with a crocheted-lace cover on its lid
under the guest bed. I don't know whether it was the same one I was
once asked to empty.
Grandpa had an automatic razor stropper to the left of the wash stand
-- you put a razor blade in a holder, then pulled the handles on the
ends of the strop alternately, and the blade was turned back and forth
to be stropped in the correct direction, on one side when you pulled
one handle, and on the other side when you pulled the other.
My grandfather used a razor strop to sharpen his straight razor.
Shaving was an intricate process. The razor was stropped, the brush
was whirled around in the soap mug, the soap was brushed onto the
face, and then the shaving began. Then a towel immersed in hot water
and then rung out was applied to the face.

Despite using a straight razor, I don't think my grandfather ever
nicked himself shaving. He was prepared, though. There was a styptic
pencil in the medicine cabinet.

That reminds me of the phrase "Take a strap to him". The razor strop
was a long, leather strap that doubled - in some homes - as a
disciplinary tool.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Tony Cooper
2019-12-21 13:54:53 UTC
Permalink
On Sat, 21 Dec 2019 05:37:57 -0000 (UTC), Lewis
Post by Lewis
Post by Tony Cooper
On Sat, 21 Dec 2019 01:49:28 +1100, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
I trust that AUE regulars are sufficiently cultured to have no
coffee-table books.
I have lots of books on my coffee table, but my coffee-table book is
in the cookbook commode in the kitchen.
You keep cookbooks in a commode?
Is there some other meaning of commode that my dictionary is unfamiliar
with?
Actually, commodes can be a good find for someone who likes antiques.
I see them occasionally in antique stores. It's a small piece of
furniture on which a bowl and pitcher were placed for morning
ablutions and with a compartment below for the chamber pot.

I'd put this one in our kitchen if there was room:
https://tinyurl.com/s2zpnwm
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
J. J. Lodder
2019-12-21 14:37:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tony Cooper
On Sat, 21 Dec 2019 05:37:57 -0000 (UTC), Lewis
Post by Lewis
Post by Tony Cooper
On Sat, 21 Dec 2019 01:49:28 +1100, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
I trust that AUE regulars are sufficiently cultured to have no
coffee-table books.
I have lots of books on my coffee table, but my coffee-table book is
in the cookbook commode in the kitchen.
You keep cookbooks in a commode?
Is there some other meaning of commode that my dictionary is unfamiliar
with?
Actually, commodes can be a good find for someone who likes antiques.
I see them occasionally in antique stores. It's a small piece of
furniture on which a bowl and pitcher were placed for morning
ablutions and with a compartment below for the chamber pot.
https://tinyurl.com/s2zpnwm
The original 'commode' was a low piece of furniture on legs,
with drawers, that was used to store linen in.
Marble tops and use for washing came later.

So using a commode for storing things isn't unreasonable,

Jan
Peter T. Daniels
2019-12-21 15:36:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by Tony Cooper
On Sat, 21 Dec 2019 05:37:57 -0000 (UTC), Lewis
Post by Lewis
Post by Tony Cooper
On Sat, 21 Dec 2019 01:49:28 +1100, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
I trust that AUE regulars are sufficiently cultured to have no
coffee-table books.
I have lots of books on my coffee table, but my coffee-table book is
in the cookbook commode in the kitchen.
You keep cookbooks in a commode?
Is there some other meaning of commode that my dictionary is unfamiliar
with?
Actually, commodes can be a good find for someone who likes antiques.
I see them occasionally in antique stores. It's a small piece of
furniture on which a bowl and pitcher were placed for morning
ablutions and with a compartment below for the chamber pot.
That's the meaning Lewis was referring to.

bil... provided the first (probably oldest, because Oxford) sense,
'chester draws' (so PM).
Post by J. J. Lodder
The original 'commode' was a low piece of furniture on legs,
with drawers, that was used to store linen in.
Marble tops and use for washing came later.
So using a commode for storing things isn't unreasonable,
So long as it's commodious enough.
b***@aol.com
2019-12-21 17:45:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by Tony Cooper
On Sat, 21 Dec 2019 05:37:57 -0000 (UTC), Lewis
Post by Lewis
Post by Tony Cooper
On Sat, 21 Dec 2019 01:49:28 +1100, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
I trust that AUE regulars are sufficiently cultured to have no
coffee-table books.
I have lots of books on my coffee table, but my coffee-table book is
in the cookbook commode in the kitchen.
You keep cookbooks in a commode?
Is there some other meaning of commode that my dictionary is unfamiliar
with?
Actually, commodes can be a good find for someone who likes antiques.
I see them occasionally in antique stores. It's a small piece of
furniture on which a bowl and pitcher were placed for morning
ablutions and with a compartment below for the chamber pot.
That's the meaning Lewis was referring to.
bil... provided the first (probably oldest, because Oxford) sense,
'chester draws' (so PM).
Post by J. J. Lodder
The original 'commode' was a low piece of furniture on legs,
with drawers, that was used to store linen in.
Marble tops and use for washing came later.
So using a commode for storing things isn't unreasonable,
So long as it's commodious enough.
No, that's a faux ami: a "commode" was named that in French because it's
supposed to be _handy_ (= adjective "commode" in French), not spacious
(commodious).
Kerr-Mudd,John
2019-12-21 19:17:23 UTC
Permalink
Le samedi 21 décembre 2019 16:37:01 UTC+1, Peter T. Daniels a
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by Tony Cooper
On Sat, 21 Dec 2019 05:37:57 -0000 (UTC), Lewis
Beeson <
Post by Tony Cooper
On Sat, 21 Dec 2019 01:49:28 +1100, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
I trust that AUE regulars are sufficiently cultured to have
no coffee-table books.
I have lots of books on my coffee table, but my coffee-table
book
is
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Tony Cooper
in the cookbook commode in the kitchen.
You keep cookbooks in a commode?
Is there some other meaning of commode that my dictionary is
unfamil
iar
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by Tony Cooper
with?
Actually, commodes can be a good find for someone who likes
antiques. I see them occasionally in antique stores. It's a
small piece of furniture on which a bowl and pitcher were placed
for morning ablutions and with a compartment below for the
chamber pot.
That's the meaning Lewis was referring to.
bil... provided the first (probably oldest, because Oxford) sense,
'chester draws' (so PM).
Post by J. J. Lodder
The original 'commode' was a low piece of furniture on legs,
with drawers, that was used to store linen in.
Marble tops and use for washing came later.
So using a commode for storing things isn't unreasonable,
So long as it's commodious enough.
No, that's a faux ami: a "commode" was named that in French because
it's supposed to be _handy_ (= adjective "commode" in French), not
spacious (commodious).
Promote that man to Commodore!
--
Bah, and indeed, Humbug.
Peter T. Daniels
2019-12-21 22:45:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by Tony Cooper
On Sat, 21 Dec 2019 05:37:57 -0000 (UTC), Lewis
Post by Lewis
Post by Tony Cooper
On Sat, 21 Dec 2019 01:49:28 +1100, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
I trust that AUE regulars are sufficiently cultured to have no
coffee-table books.
I have lots of books on my coffee table, but my coffee-table book is
in the cookbook commode in the kitchen.
You keep cookbooks in a commode?
Is there some other meaning of commode that my dictionary is unfamiliar
with?
Actually, commodes can be a good find for someone who likes antiques.
I see them occasionally in antique stores. It's a small piece of
furniture on which a bowl and pitcher were placed for morning
ablutions and with a compartment below for the chamber pot.
That's the meaning Lewis was referring to.
bil... provided the first (probably oldest, because Oxford) sense,
'chester draws' (so PM).
Post by J. J. Lodder
The original 'commode' was a low piece of furniture on legs,
with drawers, that was used to store linen in.
Marble tops and use for washing came later.
So using a commode for storing things isn't unreasonable,
So long as it's commodious enough.
No, that's a faux ami: a "commode" was named that in French because it's
supposed to be _handy_ (= adjective "commode" in French), not spacious
(commodious).
Maybe you haven't quite grasped the concept of puns?

Anyway the two English words have the same Latin etymon, commodus;
the adjective is direct from Latin, the noun from French.
b***@aol.com
2019-12-22 01:56:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by Tony Cooper
On Sat, 21 Dec 2019 05:37:57 -0000 (UTC), Lewis
Post by Lewis
Post by Tony Cooper
On Sat, 21 Dec 2019 01:49:28 +1100, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
I trust that AUE regulars are sufficiently cultured to have no
coffee-table books.
I have lots of books on my coffee table, but my coffee-table book is
in the cookbook commode in the kitchen.
You keep cookbooks in a commode?
Is there some other meaning of commode that my dictionary is unfamiliar
with?
Actually, commodes can be a good find for someone who likes antiques.
I see them occasionally in antique stores. It's a small piece of
furniture on which a bowl and pitcher were placed for morning
ablutions and with a compartment below for the chamber pot.
That's the meaning Lewis was referring to.
bil... provided the first (probably oldest, because Oxford) sense,
'chester draws' (so PM).
Post by J. J. Lodder
The original 'commode' was a low piece of furniture on legs,
with drawers, that was used to store linen in.
Marble tops and use for washing came later.
So using a commode for storing things isn't unreasonable,
So long as it's commodious enough.
No, that's a faux ami: a "commode" was named that in French because it's
supposed to be _handy_ (= adjective "commode" in French), not spacious
(commodious).
Maybe you haven't quite grasped the concept of puns?
Or maybe you really thought that a commode had to be commodious? Anyway,
I doubt many AUEers knew the meaning of the French adjective commode. Your
"pun" could have been taken for granted, so that the point I made was fully
justified.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Anyway the two English words have the same Latin etymon, commodus;
the adjective is direct from Latin, the noun from French.
Yes but neither has kept the meaning of "commodus", which is
"suitable".
Sam Plusnet
2019-12-22 02:34:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Anyway the two English words have the same Latin etymon, commodus;
the adjective is direct from Latin, the noun from French.
Yes but neither has kept the meaning of "commodus", which is
"suitable".
If you're referring to the Roman Emperor, who was "unsuitable".
--
Sam Plusnet
b***@aol.com
2019-12-22 03:28:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Anyway the two English words have the same Latin etymon, commodus;
the adjective is direct from Latin, the noun from French.
Yes but neither has kept the meaning of "commodus", which is
"suitable".
If you're referring to the Roman Emperor, who was "unsuitable".
And "pas commode".
Post by Sam Plusnet
--
Sam Plusnet
Peter T. Daniels
2019-12-22 15:03:37 UTC
Permalink
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by Tony Cooper
On Sat, 21 Dec 2019 05:37:57 -0000 (UTC), Lewis
Post by Lewis
Post by Tony Cooper
On Sat, 21 Dec 2019 01:49:28 +1100, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
I trust that AUE regulars are sufficiently cultured to have no
coffee-table books.
I have lots of books on my coffee table, but my coffee-table book is
in the cookbook commode in the kitchen.
You keep cookbooks in a commode?
Is there some other meaning of commode that my dictionary is unfamiliar
with?
Actually, commodes can be a good find for someone who likes antiques.
I see them occasionally in antique stores. It's a small piece of
furniture on which a bowl and pitcher were placed for morning
ablutions and with a compartment below for the chamber pot.
That's the meaning Lewis was referring to.
bil... provided the first (probably oldest, because Oxford) sense,
'chester draws' (so PM).
Post by J. J. Lodder
The original 'commode' was a low piece of furniture on legs,
with drawers, that was used to store linen in.
Marble tops and use for washing came later.
So using a commode for storing things isn't unreasonable,
So long as it's commodious enough.
No, that's a faux ami: a "commode" was named that in French because it's
supposed to be _handy_ (= adjective "commode" in French), not spacious
(commodious).
Maybe you haven't quite grasped the concept of puns?
Or maybe you really thought that a commode had to be commodious? Anyway,
I doubt many AUEers knew the meaning of the French adjective commode. Your
"pun" could have been taken for granted, so that the point I made was fully
justified.
If you didn't know the meanings of the English noun "commode," you
could have learned them by reading this thread.
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Anyway the two English words have the same Latin etymon, commodus;
the adjective is direct from Latin, the noun from French.
Yes but neither has kept the meaning of "commodus", which is
"suitable".
So what? PSTNSHTSTL.
b***@aol.com
2019-12-22 16:29:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by Tony Cooper
On Sat, 21 Dec 2019 05:37:57 -0000 (UTC), Lewis
Post by Lewis
Post by Tony Cooper
On Sat, 21 Dec 2019 01:49:28 +1100, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
I trust that AUE regulars are sufficiently cultured to have no
coffee-table books.
I have lots of books on my coffee table, but my coffee-table book is
in the cookbook commode in the kitchen.
You keep cookbooks in a commode?
Is there some other meaning of commode that my dictionary is unfamiliar
with?
Actually, commodes can be a good find for someone who likes antiques.
I see them occasionally in antique stores. It's a small piece of
furniture on which a bowl and pitcher were placed for morning
ablutions and with a compartment below for the chamber pot.
That's the meaning Lewis was referring to.
bil... provided the first (probably oldest, because Oxford) sense,
'chester draws' (so PM).
Post by J. J. Lodder
The original 'commode' was a low piece of furniture on legs,
with drawers, that was used to store linen in.
Marble tops and use for washing came later.
So using a commode for storing things isn't unreasonable,
So long as it's commodious enough.
No, that's a faux ami: a "commode" was named that in French because it's
supposed to be _handy_ (= adjective "commode" in French), not spacious
(commodious).
Maybe you haven't quite grasped the concept of puns?
Or maybe you really thought that a commode had to be commodious? Anyway,
I doubt many AUEers knew the meaning of the French adjective commode. Your
"pun" could have been taken for granted, so that the point I made was fully
justified.
If you didn't know the meanings of the English noun "commode," you
could have learned them by reading this thread.
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Anyway the two English words have the same Latin etymon, commodus;
the adjective is direct from Latin, the noun from French.
Yes but neither has kept the meaning of "commodus", which is
"suitable".
So what? PSTNSHTSTL.
Irrelevant, PSUFLAYGMT.
Kerr-Mudd,John
2019-12-22 16:52:31 UTC
Permalink
Le dimanche 22 décembre 2019 16:03:40 UTC+1, Peter T. Daniels a
[]
Post by Peter T. Daniels
So what? PSTNSHTSTL.
Irrelevant, PSUFLAYGMT.
CAJMUAAOAAPIH?
--
Bah, and indeed, Humbug.
J. J. Lodder
2019-12-21 18:35:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by Tony Cooper
On Sat, 21 Dec 2019 05:37:57 -0000 (UTC), Lewis
Post by Lewis
Post by Tony Cooper
On Sat, 21 Dec 2019 01:49:28 +1100, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
I trust that AUE regulars are sufficiently cultured to have no
coffee-table books.
I have lots of books on my coffee table, but my coffee-table book is
in the cookbook commode in the kitchen.
You keep cookbooks in a commode?
Is there some other meaning of commode that my dictionary is unfamiliar
with?
Actually, commodes can be a good find for someone who likes antiques.
I see them occasionally in antique stores. It's a small piece of
furniture on which a bowl and pitcher were placed for morning
ablutions and with a compartment below for the chamber pot.
That's the meaning Lewis was referring to.
bil... provided the first (probably oldest, because Oxford) sense,
'chester draws' (so PM).
Post by J. J. Lodder
The original 'commode' was a low piece of furniture on legs,
with drawers, that was used to store linen in.
Marble tops and use for washing came later.
So using a commode for storing things isn't unreasonable,
So long as it's commodious enough.
No problem, as long as it can be recirculated,

Jan
Peter T. Daniels
2019-12-20 17:18:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Fri, 20 Dec 2019 16:03:03 +1100, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by b***@shaw.ca
I built a coffee table in shop in 1963, when I was 14. It was called
a coffee table then and it remains a coffee table now in CanE. I
researched buying a new one online not long ago and noted that there
are also end tables and side tables, but then tend to sit at the end
of a sofa or between living room chairs, while coffee tables are
always the central living room table.
For my own comfort, I prefer to have a coffee table at my right hand
when I'm sitting in a lounge chair, so in the past I've generally had
one between two chairs. Of course this depends on how the room is laid
out, and how many coffee tables you have, but in any case I use the name
"coffee table" for all such low tables.
A central coffee table is equally inconvenient for everyone - it
requires leaning forward to pick up and put down your cup - but in many
cases it's the best available solution. Still, I believe that it's best
to have several small coffee tables, if possible, and no central one.
Shirley a coffee table needs to be large enough to hold at least one
coffee-table book as well as coffee cups?
And perhaps a full silver coffee-and-tea service, with tray?
CDB
2019-12-20 13:05:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by b***@shaw.ca
I built a coffee table in shop in 1963, when I was 14. It was
called a coffee table then and it remains a coffee table now in
CanE. I researched buying a new one online not long ago and noted
that there are also end tables and side tables, but then tend to
sit at the end of a sofa or between living room chairs, while
coffee tables are always the central living room table.
For my own comfort, I prefer to have a coffee table at my right hand
when I'm sitting in a lounge chair, so in the past I've generally
had one between two chairs. Of course this depends on how the room is
laid out, and how many coffee tables you have, but in any case I use
the name "coffee table" for all such low tables.
A central coffee table is equally inconvenient for everyone - it
requires leaning forward to pick up and put down your cup - but in
many cases it's the best available solution. Still, I believe that
it's best to have several small coffee tables, if possible, and no
central one.
You need a place to display those big heavy books. An end-table would
topple or be crushed.
Mack A. Damia
2019-12-20 17:21:38 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 20 Dec 2019 16:03:03 +1100, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by b***@shaw.ca
I built a coffee table in shop in 1963, when I was 14. It was called
a coffee table then and it remains a coffee table now in CanE. I
researched buying a new one online not long ago and noted that there
are also end tables and side tables, but then tend to sit at the end
of a sofa or between living room chairs, while coffee tables are
always the central living room table.
For my own comfort, I prefer to have a coffee table at my right hand
when I'm sitting in a lounge chair, so in the past I've generally had
one between two chairs. Of course this depends on how the room is laid
out, and how many coffee tables you have, but in any case I use the name
"coffee table" for all such low tables.
A central coffee table is equally inconvenient for everyone - it
requires leaning forward to pick up and put down your cup - but in many
cases it's the best available solution. Still, I believe that it's best
to have several small coffee tables, if possible, and no central one.

Kerr-Mudd,John
2019-12-20 17:38:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Fri, 20 Dec 2019 16:03:03 +1100, Peter Moylan
[]
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by Peter Moylan
"coffee table" for all such low tables.
A central coffee table is equally inconvenient for everyone - it
requires leaning forward to pick up and put down your cup - but in many
cases it's the best available solution. Still, I believe that it's best
to have several small coffee tables, if possible, and no central one.
http://youtu.be/dE5ROl2YPbs
Apprently I'm not ready for Stadia

But after the ad; not impressed; the whole thing is bonkos.
--
Bah, and indeed, Humbug.
Ken Blake
2019-12-20 15:47:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by b***@shaw.ca
Post by Rich Ulrich
On Thu, 19 Dec 2019 09:51:58 -0500, Tony Cooper
Post by Tony Cooper
He also wrote that the "sofa board" was moved. Turns out that this
was a translation error. In Danish, a table is a "bord" and the sofa
bord is a low table placed in front of a sofa (or couch).
I've always called that a coffee table. Are there other terms?
I constructed a coffee table in woodshop when I was 17.
It occurs to me that I seldom read "coffee table" anywhere,
that I remember.
I wondered if the term was falling out of use, but Google-ngram
shows the opposite. While it has been rather more frequent in US
than UK, the usage in each increased 5-fold+ from 1965 to 2000.
I built a coffee table in shop in 1963, when I was 14. It was called
a coffee table then and it remains a coffee table now in CanE.
I researched buying a new one online not long ago and noted that
there are also end tables and side tables, but then tend to sit
at the end of a sofa or between living room chairs, while coffee
tables are always the central living room table.
Yes. I don't know any other name for them but "coffee table."

We have two coffee tables in our house, but we've never had coffee on
either of them.
--
Ken
Spains Harden
2019-12-20 16:24:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ken Blake
Post by b***@shaw.ca
Post by Rich Ulrich
On Thu, 19 Dec 2019 09:51:58 -0500, Tony Cooper
Post by Tony Cooper
He also wrote that the "sofa board" was moved. Turns out that this
was a translation error. In Danish, a table is a "bord" and the sofa
bord is a low table placed in front of a sofa (or couch).
I've always called that a coffee table. Are there other terms?
I constructed a coffee table in woodshop when I was 17.
It occurs to me that I seldom read "coffee table" anywhere,
that I remember.
I wondered if the term was falling out of use, but Google-ngram
shows the opposite. While it has been rather more frequent in US
than UK, the usage in each increased 5-fold+ from 1965 to 2000.
I built a coffee table in shop in 1963, when I was 14. It was called
a coffee table then and it remains a coffee table now in CanE.
I researched buying a new one online not long ago and noted that
there are also end tables and side tables, but then tend to sit
at the end of a sofa or between living room chairs, while coffee
tables are always the central living room table.
Yes. I don't know any other name for them but "coffee table."
We have two coffee tables in our house, but we've never had coffee on
either of them.
We have three but they ObAUE "nest".
Peter T. Daniels
2019-12-20 17:16:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by b***@shaw.ca
Post by Rich Ulrich
On Thu, 19 Dec 2019 09:51:58 -0500, Tony Cooper
Post by Tony Cooper
He also wrote that the "sofa board" was moved. Turns out that this
was a translation error. In Danish, a table is a "bord" and the sofa
bord is a low table placed in front of a sofa (or couch).
I've always called that a coffee table. Are there other terms?
I constructed a coffee table in woodshop when I was 17.
It occurs to me that I seldom read "coffee table" anywhere,
that I remember.
I wondered if the term was falling out of use, but Google-ngram
shows the opposite. While it has been rather more frequent in US
than UK, the usage in each increased 5-fold+ from 1965 to 2000.
I built a coffee table in shop in 1963, when I was 14. It was called
a coffee table then and it remains a coffee table now in CanE.
I researched buying a new one online not long ago and noted that
there are also end tables and side tables, but then tend to sit
at the end of a sofa or between living room chairs, while coffee
tables are always the central living room table.
The other two are also probably taller, level with the arms of the sofa
or chairs, while coffee tables are usually level with the seats, giving
fastidious homemakers the frequent opportunity to swat peoples' feet off
the table.
Tony Cooper
2019-12-20 04:37:28 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 19 Dec 2019 23:14:28 -0500, Rich Ulrich
Post by Rich Ulrich
On Thu, 19 Dec 2019 09:51:58 -0500, Tony Cooper
Post by Tony Cooper
He also wrote that the "sofa board" was moved. Turns out that this
was a translation error. In Danish, a table is a "bord" and the sofa
bord is a low table placed in front of a sofa (or couch).
I've always called that a coffee table. Are there other terms?
I constructed a coffee table in woodshop when I was 17.
It occurs to me that I seldom read "coffee table" anywhere,
that I remember.
I wondered if the term was falling out of use, but Google-ngram
shows the opposite. While it has been rather more frequent in US
than UK, the usage in each increased 5-fold+ from 1965 to 2000.
It's a "coffee table" to me, but I guess it's a couch table in
Denmark.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Anders D. Nygaard
2019-12-20 22:45:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tony Cooper
It's a "coffee table" to me, but I guess it's a couch table in
Denmark.
"sofabord" translates literally to couch table, yes.

The one in our living room is slightly higher than the seats
of our couch. It is far more frequently used for tea than coffee,
and usually contains a small fruit bowl, an even smaller bowl
with sweets, a couple of potted plants, my wife's knitting
recipes (patterns?) and any number of odds and ends which just
seem to pile up. Currently also Christmas candles.

/Anders, Denmark.
Jerry Friedman
2019-12-21 14:57:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by Anders D. Nygaard
Post by Tony Cooper
It's a "coffee table" to me, but I guess it's a couch table in
Denmark.
"sofabord" translates literally to couch table, yes.
The one in our living room is slightly higher than the seats
of our couch. It is far more frequently used for tea than coffee,
and usually contains a small fruit bowl, an even smaller bowl
with sweets, a couple of potted plants, my wife's knitting
recipes (patterns?) and any number of odds and ends which just
seem to pile up. Currently also Christmas candles.
Yes, knitting patterns.
--
Jerry Friedman
Lewis
2019-12-20 15:10:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by Rich Ulrich
On Thu, 19 Dec 2019 09:51:58 -0500, Tony Cooper
Post by Tony Cooper
He also wrote that the "sofa board" was moved. Turns out that this
was a translation error. In Danish, a table is a "bord" and the sofa
bord is a low table placed in front of a sofa (or couch).
I've always called that a coffee table. Are there other terms?
I don't think so. Or at least none come to mind.
--
In my world there are people in chains and you can ride them like
ponies
Snidely
2019-12-19 12:05:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
Post by Peter Young
Post by Peter T. Daniels
In last night's Miss Fisher's Murder Mysteries (from 2013), set
in Melbourne, Inspector Jack Robinson refers to a jewel thief
who's been hitting salons d'haute couture as having done the same
at something like "Sydney up on the North Shore," and I tried to
picture what Sydney is on the northern shore of; but then I
supposed it might mean where the northern end of the Harbour
Bridge was or was about to be (the time seems to be fairly early
in the 1920s). In that case, that side of Sydney Harbour must
have been the posh area? (One can't tell from the photographs
whether the Opera House is at the north or south end of the
bridge.) (Or, for that matter, what compass direction the bridge
lies on.)
I'm sure Another Peter can elucidate a lot more than I can, but
I've been in Sydney visiting my elder daughter. The Opera House is
East of the South end of the bridge, on the East bank of Circular
Quay, which is rectangular. The Bridge lies a few degrees Eastward
of South to North, and North Shore seems to refer to the coastal
land North of the Harbour.
Sounds about right. Actually it Rocks!
As others have mentioned, The Rocks is on the south side of the harbour.
So are a few other fashionable places: Darling Harbour, the Opera House,
the city centre, The Domain, and so on. So this is the area that a
visitor to Sydney would probably want to explore. This area is also
attractive to rich people who like inner-city living. But, for the most
part, the wealthy people live on the North Shore, which is the area
north of Sydney Harbour and within a few kilometres of the coast, with
plenty of trees for shade.
I got most of that from Google Maps, strangely enough.
Post by Peter Moylan
For those who know the San Francisco Bay area, the North Shore is the
Marin County of Sydney.
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
I guess the North Shore was posh 'cos you had to have a boat to get
into town (though I've been told it's desirable in Oz to have a
North-facing property to get the most sunshine - you gluttons!)
On the east coast of Australia, which is also where I live, the main
factors that make an area attractive are nearness to a beach, and height
above sea level. (I'm in an area that's neither rich nor poor, so I'm
only partway up the nearest hill, and about 20 minutes' drive from
beaches.) The height is desirable for sea breezes. Sydney's North Shore
is hilly enough and coastal enough to be popular.
The area was only lightly settled prior to the building of the Sydney
Harbour Bridge (1932), but some wealthy people would have lived there
then. By now you have not only the bridge, but plenty of ferries. For
tourists, I would recommend a ferry trip from Circular Quay (south
shore) to the zoo (north shore), or perhaps a longer ride from Darling
Harbour to Manly.
[...]
/dps
--
Rule #0: Don't be on fire.
In case of fire, exit the building before tweeting about it.
(Sighting reported by Adam F)
Spains Harden
2019-12-19 15:47:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
Post by Peter Young
Post by Peter T. Daniels
In last night's Miss Fisher's Murder Mysteries (from 2013), set in
Melbourne, Inspector Jack Robinson refers to a jewel thief who's been
hitting salons d'haute couture as having done the same at something
like "Sydney up on the North Shore," and I tried to picture what
Sydney is on the northern shore of; but then I supposed it might mean
where the northern end of the Harbour Bridge was or was about to be
(the time seems to be fairly early in the 1920s). In that case, that
side of Sydney Harbour must have been the posh area? (One can't tell
from the photographs whether the Opera House is at the north or south
end of the bridge.) (Or, for that matter, what compass direction the
bridge lies on.)
I'm sure Another Peter can elucidate a lot more than I can, but I've
been in Sydney visiting my elder daughter. The Opera House is East of
the South end of the bridge, on the East bank of Circular Quay, which
is rectangular. The Bridge lies a few degrees Eastward of South to
North, and North Shore seems to refer to the coastal land North of the
Harbour.
Peter.
Sounds about right. Actually it Rocks!
I guess the North Shore was posh 'cos you had to have a boat to get into
town (though I've been told it's desirable in Oz to have a North-facing
property to get the most sunshine - you gluttons!)
Perhaps you can check your spirit-level to make sure you are the right
way up? In Britain you want a north-facing property to get all-day
sunshine by way of your south-facing back garden.

A SW-facing garden is perfect in Britain; and means the unfavoured front
gets a perfect dawn.
Peter T. Daniels
2019-12-18 21:21:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Young
Post by Peter T. Daniels
In last night's Miss Fisher's Murder Mysteries (from 2013), set in Melbourne,
Inspector Jack Robinson refers to a jewel thief who's been hitting salons
d'haute couture as having done the same at something like "Sydney up on the
North Shore," and I tried to picture what Sydney is on the northern shore
of; but then I supposed it might mean where the northern end of the Harbour
Bridge was or was about to be (the time seems to be fairly early in the
1920s). In that case, that side of Sydney Harbour must have been the posh
area? (One can't tell from the photographs whether the Opera House is at
the north or south end of the bridge.) (Or, for that matter, what compass
direction the bridge lies on.)
I'm sure Another Peter can elucidate a lot more than I can, but I've been
in Sydney visiting my elder daughter. The Opera House is East of the South
end of the bridge, on the East bank of Circular Quay, which is
rectangular. The Bridge lies a few degrees Eastward of South to North, and
North Shore seems to refer to the coastal land North of the Harbour.
That's surprising. The usual photo shows the Opera House below and to the
left of the Bridge, at the top of the photo, and we're conditioned to
expect north to be at the top.
Peter Young
2019-12-18 22:12:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Peter Young
Post by Peter T. Daniels
In last night's Miss Fisher's Murder Mysteries (from 2013), set in Melbourne,
Inspector Jack Robinson refers to a jewel thief who's been hitting salons
d'haute couture as having done the same at something like "Sydney up on the
North Shore," and I tried to picture what Sydney is on the northern shore
of; but then I supposed it might mean where the northern end of the Harbour
Bridge was or was about to be (the time seems to be fairly early in the
1920s). In that case, that side of Sydney Harbour must have been the posh
area? (One can't tell from the photographs whether the Opera House is at
the north or south end of the bridge.) (Or, for that matter, what compass
direction the bridge lies on.)
I'm sure Another Peter can elucidate a lot more than I can, but I've been
in Sydney visiting my elder daughter. The Opera House is East of the South
end of the bridge, on the East bank of Circular Quay, which is
rectangular. The Bridge lies a few degrees Eastward of South to North, and
North Shore seems to refer to the coastal land North of the Harbour.
That's surprising. The usual photo shows the Opera House below and to the
left of the Bridge, at the top of the photo, and we're conditioned to
expect north to be at the top.
You forget that they're upside down there. When I was there, from my
viewpoint, the opera house was definitely to the right of the bridge. I
think that Google Maps will confirm this.

Peter.
--
Peter Young, (BrE, RP), Consultant Anaesthetist, 1975-2004.
(US equivalent: Certified Anesthesiologist) (AUE Hg)
Cheltenham and Gloucester, UK. Now happily retired.
http://pnyoung.orpheusweb.co.uk
Peter T. Daniels
2019-12-18 23:06:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Young
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Peter Young
Post by Peter T. Daniels
In last night's Miss Fisher's Murder Mysteries (from 2013), set in Melbourne,
Inspector Jack Robinson refers to a jewel thief who's been hitting salons
d'haute couture as having done the same at something like "Sydney up on the
North Shore," and I tried to picture what Sydney is on the northern shore
of; but then I supposed it might mean where the northern end of the Harbour
Bridge was or was about to be (the time seems to be fairly early in the
1920s). In that case, that side of Sydney Harbour must have been the posh
area? (One can't tell from the photographs whether the Opera House is at
the north or south end of the bridge.) (Or, for that matter, what compass
direction the bridge lies on.)
I'm sure Another Peter can elucidate a lot more than I can, but I've been
in Sydney visiting my elder daughter. The Opera House is East of the South
end of the bridge, on the East bank of Circular Quay, which is
rectangular. The Bridge lies a few degrees Eastward of South to North, and
North Shore seems to refer to the coastal land North of the Harbour.
That's surprising. The usual photo shows the Opera House below and to the
left of the Bridge, at the top of the photo, and we're conditioned to
expect north to be at the top.
You forget that they're upside down there. When I was there, from my
viewpoint, the opera house was definitely to the right of the bridge. I
think that Google Maps will confirm this.
But it's at the top of the usual tourist picture, which would seem to
accord with the principle of putting the focus of an image nearer the
top than the bottom. If you're seeing it from the actual other end of
the Bridge, you know how the sun is shining on it. Hmm, the shapes of
the shells might mean it doesn't make a particularly visible shadow
for most of the day -- and they would help with the absolute orientation.
CDB
2019-12-18 17:12:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
d'haute couture
"De haute couture". The "h" in "haute"
is aspirate, and does not permit the liaison.

"Table d'hôte" is okay, though.
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2019-12-18 17:16:56 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 18 Dec 2019 07:59:18 -0800 (PST), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
In last night's Miss Fisher's Murder Mysteries (from 2013), set in Melbourne,
Inspector Jack Robinson refers to a jewel thief who's been hitting salons
d'haute couture as having done the same at something like "Sydney up on the
North Shore," and I tried to picture what Sydney is on the northern shore
of; but then I supposed it might mean where the northern end of the Harbour
Bridge was or was about to be (the time seems to be fairly early in the
1920s). In that case, that side of Sydney Harbour must have been the posh
area? (One can't tell from the photographs whether the Opera House is at
the north or south end of the bridge.) (Or, for that matter, what compass
direction the bridge lies on.)
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/North_Shore_(Sydney)>

The North Shore refers to a group of suburbs north of Sydney Central
Business District in New South Wales, Australia. The term generally
refers to the suburbs located on the northern side of Sydney Harbour
up to and including Hornsby and between Middle Harbour and the Lane
Cove River.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
It was from the Second Series; the DVD price, as offered at the end of the
program, is as elevated as BBC DVDs are; do Phryne and Jack ever get together,
or have they kept just making googly-eyes at each other for however long the
show has lasted? Collins (does he even have a first name?) and Dot are doing
much better on that front.
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Kerr-Mudd,John
2019-12-18 17:50:13 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 18 Dec 2019 17:16:56 GMT, "Peter Duncanson [BrE]"
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Wed, 18 Dec 2019 07:59:18 -0800 (PST), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
In last night's Miss Fisher's Murder Mysteries (from 2013), set in
Melbourne,
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Inspector Jack Robinson refers to a jewel thief who's been hitting
salons
Post by Peter T. Daniels
d'haute couture as having done the same at something like "Sydney up on
the
Post by Peter T. Daniels
North Shore," and I tried to picture what Sydney is on the northern
shore
Post by Peter T. Daniels
of; but then I supposed it might mean where the northern end of the
Harbour
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Bridge was or was about to be (the time seems to be fairly early in the
1920s). In that case, that side of Sydney Harbour must have been the
posh
Post by Peter T. Daniels
area? (One can't tell from the photographs whether the Opera House is at
the north or south end of the bridge.) (Or, for that matter, what
compass
Post by Peter T. Daniels
direction the bridge lies on.)
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/North_Shore_(Sydney)>
The North Shore refers to a group of suburbs north of Sydney Central
Business District in New South Wales, Australia. The term generally
refers to the suburbs located on the northern side of Sydney Harbour
up to and including Hornsby and between Middle Harbour and the Lane
Cove River.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
It was from the Second Series; the DVD price, as offered at the end of
the
Post by Peter T. Daniels
program, is as elevated as BBC DVDs are; do Phryne and Jack ever get
together,
Post by Peter T. Daniels
or have they kept just making googly-eyes at each other for however
long
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
the
Post by Peter T. Daniels
show has lasted? Collins (does he even have a first name?) and Dot are
doing
Post by Peter T. Daniels
much better on that front.
He seems to be asking all this, then complains about lack of spoilers.
Furrfu.
--
Bah, and indeed, Humbug.
Peter T. Daniels
2019-12-18 21:23:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
On Wed, 18 Dec 2019 17:16:56 GMT, "Peter Duncanson [BrE]"
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Wed, 18 Dec 2019 07:59:18 -0800 (PST), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
In last night's Miss Fisher's Murder Mysteries (from 2013), set in
Melbourne,
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Inspector Jack Robinson refers to a jewel thief who's been hitting
salons
Post by Peter T. Daniels
d'haute couture as having done the same at something like "Sydney up on
the
Post by Peter T. Daniels
North Shore," and I tried to picture what Sydney is on the northern
shore
Post by Peter T. Daniels
of; but then I supposed it might mean where the northern end of the
Harbour
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Bridge was or was about to be (the time seems to be fairly early in the
1920s). In that case, that side of Sydney Harbour must have been the
posh
Post by Peter T. Daniels
area? (One can't tell from the photographs whether the Opera House is
at
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by Peter T. Daniels
the north or south end of the bridge.) (Or, for that matter, what
compass
Post by Peter T. Daniels
direction the bridge lies on.)
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/North_Shore_(Sydney)>
The North Shore refers to a group of suburbs north of Sydney
Central
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Business District in New South Wales, Australia. The term generally
refers to the suburbs located on the northern side of Sydney
Harbour
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
up to and including Hornsby and between Middle Harbour and the Lane
Cove River.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
It was from the Second Series; the DVD price, as offered at the end of
the
Post by Peter T. Daniels
program, is as elevated as BBC DVDs are; do Phryne and Jack ever get
together,
Post by Peter T. Daniels
or have they kept just making googly-eyes at each other for however
long
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
the
Post by Peter T. Daniels
show has lasted? Collins (does he even have a first name?) and Dot are
doing
Post by Peter T. Daniels
much better on that front.
He seems to be asking all this, then complains about lack of spoilers.
Furrfu.
--
Bah, and indeed, Humbug.
What on earth is that supposed to mean???

I asked a potentially revealing question after leaving plenty of spoiler
space above it, and made no complaint whatsoever about spoilers by anyone.
Quinn C
2019-12-18 18:16:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
It was from the Second Series; the DVD price, as offered at the end of the
program, is as elevated as BBC DVDs are
Series 1-3, a 10 DVD set, is sold by Amazon Canada for C$69.

Also available for ca. C$45 including shipping from England (which
makes it a region 2 DVD which might not play on NAm devices.)
--
(\_/)
(='.'=) This is Bunny. Copy and paste Bunny into your
(")_(") signature to help him gain world domination.
Peter T. Daniels
2019-12-18 21:26:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by Quinn C
Post by Peter T. Daniels
It was from the Second Series; the DVD price, as offered at the end of the
program, is as elevated as BBC DVDs are
Series 1-3, a 10 DVD set, is sold by Amazon Canada for C$69.
Also available for ca. C$45 including shipping from England (which
makes it a region 2 DVD which might not play on NAm devices.)
They always cost more when they're offered as premiums after a broadcast.
For "Series 2" (they don't say how many episodes or disks) they ask $59.95.
b***@aol.com
2019-12-18 19:22:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
In last night's Miss Fisher's Murder Mysteries (from 2013), set in Melbourne,
Inspector Jack Robinson refers to a jewel thief who's been hitting salons
d'haute couture
ObFrench: "de haute couture", the h is "aspiré". PSUFLAYGMT.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
as having done the same at something like "Sydney up on the
North Shore," and I tried to picture what Sydney is on the northern shore
of; but then I supposed it might mean where the northern end of the Harbour
Bridge was or was about to be (the time seems to be fairly early in the
1920s). In that case, that side of Sydney Harbour must have been the posh
area? (One can't tell from the photographs whether the Opera House is at
the north or south end of the bridge.) (Or, for that matter, what compass
direction the bridge lies on.)
It was from the Second Series; the DVD price, as offered at the end of the
program, is as elevated as BBC DVDs are; do Phryne and Jack ever get together,
or have they kept just making googly-eyes at each other for however long the
show has lasted? Collins (does he even have a first name?) and Dot are doing
much better on that front.
Quinn C
2019-12-18 19:27:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
In last night's Miss Fisher's Murder Mysteries (from 2013), set in Melbourne,
Inspector Jack Robinson refers to a jewel thief who's been hitting salons
d'haute couture
ObFrench: "de haute couture", the h is "aspiré". PSUFLAYGMT.
^^^^^^^^^^

I only understand "Soufflé UTC".
--
(\_/)
(='.'=) This is Bunny. Copy and paste Bunny into your
(")_(") signature to help him gain world domination.
Percival P. Cassidy
2019-12-18 22:06:51 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
In last night's Miss Fisher's Murder Mysteries (from 2013), set in Melbourne,
Inspector Jack Robinson refers to a jewel thief who's been hitting salons
d'haute couture as having done the same at something like "Sydney up on the
North Shore," and I tried to picture what Sydney is on the northern shore
of; but then I supposed it might mean where the northern end of the Harbour
Bridge was or was about to be (the time seems to be fairly early in the
1920s). In that case, that side of Sydney Harbour must have been the posh
area? (One can't tell from the photographs whether the Opera House is at
the north or south end of the bridge.) (Or, for that matter, what compass
direction the bridge lies on.)
It was from the Second Series; the DVD price, as offered at the end of the
program, is as elevated as BBC DVDs are; do Phryne and Jack ever get together,
or have they kept just making googly-eyes at each other for however long the
show has lasted? Collins (does he even have a first name?) and Dot are doing
much better on that front.
Sydney's "North Shore" area is posh and expensive. Tautology?

Perce
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