Discussion:
"Off the pace" in racing
(too old to reply)
Commander Kinsey
2020-01-04 15:47:17 UTC
Permalink
I was rather irritated the other day watching slalom skiing.
Mr Smith goes down and gets 1m30s.
Mr Jones goes down and gets 1m29s.
Clearly Mr Jones is better, faster, less time, the winner.
But the commentator says "Mr Jones got 1 second off the pace".
Pace means speed. "Off the pace" would mean LESS speed.
But he didn't have less speed, he had MORE. He had less TIME.
How can a professional commentator get speed and time mixed up?!
Peeler
2020-01-04 17:08:21 UTC
Permalink
On Sat, 04 Jan 2020 15:47:17 -0000, Birdbrain Macaw (aka "Commander Kinsey",
"James Wilkinson", "Steven Wanker","Bruce Farquar", "Fred Johnson, etc.),
the pathological resident idiot and attention whore of all the uk ngs,
blathered again:

<FLUSH the clinically insane trolling attention whore's latest
attention-baiting sick bullshit unread again>
--
damduck-***@yahoo.co.uk about Birdbrain Macaw's (now "James Wilkinson" LOL)
trolling:
"He is a well known attention seeking troll and every reply you
make feeds him.
Starts many threads most of which die quick as on the UK groups anyone
with sense Kill filed him ages ago which is why he now cross posts to
the US groups for a new audience.
This thread was unusual in that it derived and continued without him
to a large extent and his silly questioning is an attempt to get
noticed again."
MID: <***@4ax.com>
--
ItsJoanNotJoann addressing Birdbrain Macaw's (now "James Wilkinson" LOL):
"You're an annoying troll and I'm done with you and your
stupidity."
MID: <e39a6a7f-9677-4e78-a866-***@googlegroups.com>
--
AndyW addressing Birdbrain:
"Troll or idiot?...
You have been presented with a viewpoint with information, reasoning,
historical cases, citations and references to back it up and wilfully
ignore all going back to your idea which has no supporting information."
MID: <KaToA.263621$***@fx10.am4>
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ass hole jerk. ...You fit under unconditional Idiot and should be put in
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"Ok. I'm persuaded . You are an idiot."
MID: <obru31$nao$***@dont-email.me>
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"Frigging Idiot. Get the hell out of my thread."
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"the piss poor delivery boy with no hot running water, 11 cats and
several parrots living in his hovel."
MID: <odqtgc$iug$***@dont-email.me>
--
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"He's a perennial idiot"
MID: <***@Mars>
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lower than your age, and I accept that as a reason for your comments."
MID: <***@news.eternal-september.org>
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"He's just desperate to be noticed. Any attention will do, no matter how
negative it may be."
MID: <***@brightview.co.uk>
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***@gmail.com asking Birdbrain:
"What, were you dropped on your head as a child?"
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--
Christie addressing endlessly driveling Birdbrain Macaw (now "James
Wilkinson" LOL):
"What are you resurrecting that old post of mine for? It's from last
month some time. You're like a dog who's just dug up an old bone they
hid in the garden until they were ready to have another go at it."
MID: <***@news.eternal-september.org>
--
Mr Pounder's fitting description of Birdbrain Macaw:
"You are a well known fool, a tosser, a pillock, a stupid unemployable
sponging failure who will always live alone and will die alone. You will not
be missed."
MID: <orree6$on2$***@dont-email.me>
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Only useful thing you've done in your pathetic existence."
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""not the sharpest knife in the drawer"'s parents sure made a serious
mistake having him born alive -- A total waste of oxygen, food, space,
and bandwidth."
MID: <***@4ax.com>
--
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running water with loads of stinking cats and a few parrots."
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"He seems to have a reputation as someone of limited intelligence"
MID: <cf06cdd9-8bb8-469c-800a-***@googlegroups.com>
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Peter Moylan about Birdbrain (now "James Wilkinson" LOL):
"If people like JWS didn't exist, we would have to find some other way to
explain the concept of "invincible ignorance"."
MID: <otofc8$tbg$***@dont-email.me>
--
Lewis about nym-shifting Birdbrain:
"Typical narcissist troll, thinks his shit is so grand he has the right to
try to force it on everyone."
MID: <***@jaka.local>
Mack A. Damia
2020-01-04 23:00:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peeler
On Sat, 04 Jan 2020 15:47:17 -0000, Birdbrain Macaw (aka "Commander Kinsey",
"James Wilkinson", "Steven Wanker","Bruce Farquar", "Fred Johnson, etc.),
the pathological resident idiot and attention whore of all the uk ngs,
<FLUSH the clinically insane trolling attention whore's latest
attention-baiting sick bullshit unread again>
--
"He is a well known attention seeking troll and every reply you
make feeds him.
Will the monitor screen clean-up crew please report to this post as
soon as possible, please? Prep for coffee and ham sandwich residue.
Peeler
2020-01-04 23:29:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by Peeler
On Sat, 04 Jan 2020 15:47:17 -0000, Birdbrain Macaw (aka "Commander Kinsey",
"James Wilkinson", "Steven Wanker","Bruce Farquar", "Fred Johnson, etc.),
the pathological resident idiot and attention whore of all the uk ngs,
<FLUSH the clinically insane trolling attention whore's latest
attention-baiting sick bullshit unread again>
--
"He is a well known attention seeking troll and every reply you
make feeds him.
Will the monitor screen clean-up crew please report to this post as
soon as possible, please? Prep for coffee and ham sandwich residue.
Are you senile or what? <BG>
b***@aol.com
2020-01-04 17:22:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by Commander Kinsey
I was rather irritated the other day watching slalom skiing.
Mr Smith goes down and gets 1m30s.
Mr Jones goes down and gets 1m29s.
Clearly Mr Jones is better, faster, less time, the winner.
But the commentator says "Mr Jones got 1 second off the pace".
Pace means speed. "Off the pace" would mean LESS speed.
But he didn't have less speed, he had MORE. He had less TIME.
How can a professional commentator get speed and time mixed up?!
Speed = distance/time while pace = time/distance, so Mr Jones did get
1 second off the pace.
Jerry Friedman
2020-01-04 18:02:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Commander Kinsey
I was rather irritated the other day watching slalom skiing.
Mr Smith goes down and gets 1m30s.
Mr Jones goes down and gets 1m29s.
Clearly Mr Jones is better, faster, less time, the winner.
But the commentator says "Mr Jones got 1 second off the pace".
Pace means speed. "Off the pace" would mean LESS speed.
But he didn't have less speed, he had MORE. He had less TIME.
How can a professional commentator get speed and time mixed up?!
Speed = distance/time while pace = time/distance, so Mr Jones did get
1 second off the pace.
I don't think I've ever heard or seen that meaning for "pace". As
far as I know, it just means "speed".
--
Jerry Friedman
b***@aol.com
2020-01-04 18:24:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Commander Kinsey
I was rather irritated the other day watching slalom skiing.
Mr Smith goes down and gets 1m30s.
Mr Jones goes down and gets 1m29s.
Clearly Mr Jones is better, faster, less time, the winner.
But the commentator says "Mr Jones got 1 second off the pace".
Pace means speed. "Off the pace" would mean LESS speed.
But he didn't have less speed, he had MORE. He had less TIME.
How can a professional commentator get speed and time mixed up?!
Speed = distance/time while pace = time/distance, so Mr Jones did get
1 second off the pace.
I don't think I've ever heard or seen that meaning for "pace". As
far as I know, it just means "speed".
Not an uncommon meaning of the word in sports. For instance, Wiki says:

---
Running
In running, pace is usually defined as the number of minutes it takes to
cover a mile or kilometer. Pacing is often a critical aspect of endurance
events. Some coaches advocate training at a combination of specific paces
related to one's fitness in order to stimulate various physiological
improvements.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pace_(speed)
---
Post by Jerry Friedman
--
Jerry Friedman
Jerry Friedman
2020-01-04 18:59:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Commander Kinsey
I was rather irritated the other day watching slalom skiing.
Mr Smith goes down and gets 1m30s.
Mr Jones goes down and gets 1m29s.
Clearly Mr Jones is better, faster, less time, the winner.
But the commentator says "Mr Jones got 1 second off the pace".
Pace means speed. "Off the pace" would mean LESS speed.
But he didn't have less speed, he had MORE. He had less TIME.
How can a professional commentator get speed and time mixed up?!
Speed = distance/time while pace = time/distance, so Mr Jones did get
1 second off the pace.
I don't think I've ever heard or seen that meaning for "pace". As
far as I know, it just means "speed".
---
Running
In running, pace is usually defined as the number of minutes it takes to
cover a mile or kilometer. Pacing is often a critical aspect of endurance
events. Some coaches advocate training at a combination of specific paces
related to one's fitness in order to stimulate various physiological
improvements.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pace_(speed)
OK, thanks.
--
Jerry Friedman
Peter T. Daniels
2020-01-04 19:16:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by b***@aol.com
Speed = distance/time while pace = time/distance, so Mr Jones did get
1 second off the pace.
I don't think I've ever heard or seen that meaning for "pace". As
far as I know, it just means "speed".
---
Running
In running, pace is usually defined as the number of minutes it takes to
cover a mile or kilometer. Pacing is often a critical aspect of endurance
events. Some coaches advocate training at a combination of specific paces
related to one's fitness in order to stimulate various physiological
improvements.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pace_(speed)
I think we hear "NN finished the marathon in a respectable 2 1/2 hours,
a 6-minutes-per-mile pace." (Not "a 10 mph pace.")
Commander Kinsey
2020-01-04 19:55:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jerry Friedman
Le samedi 4 janvier 2020 16:47:25 UTC+1, Commander Kinsey a =E9crit=
Post by Commander Kinsey
I was rather irritated the other day watching slalom skiing.
Mr Smith goes down and gets 1m30s.
Mr Jones goes down and gets 1m29s.
Clearly Mr Jones is better, faster, less time, the winner.
But the commentator says "Mr Jones got 1 second off the pace".
Pace means speed. "Off the pace" would mean LESS speed.
But he didn't have less speed, he had MORE. He had less TIME.
How can a professional commentator get speed and time mixed up?!
Speed =3D distance/time while pace =3D time/distance, so Mr Jones d=
id get
Post by Jerry Friedman
1 second off the pace.
I don't think I've ever heard or seen that meaning for "pace". As
far as I know, it just means "speed".
Not an uncommon meaning of the word in sports. For instance, Wiki says=
---
Running
In running, pace is usually defined as the number of minutes it takes =
to
cover a mile or kilometer. Pacing is often a critical aspect of endura=
nce
events. Some coaches advocate training at a combination of specific pa=
ces
related to one's fitness in order to stimulate various physiological
improvements.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pace_(speed)
---
Ah, so it's actually the whole sports community that have it wrong. If =
you look up pace in a dictionary, it clearly says it's the speed somethi=
ng travels at (including people and running):
https://www.thefreedictionary.com/pace
"The rate of speed at which a person, animal, or group walks or runs."
Flipping the meaning upside down is just causing confusion. More pace i=
s faster.

This is as daft as people who say "it'll take 5 light years to get there=
".
Lewis
2020-01-04 20:08:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by Commander Kinsey
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Commander Kinsey
I was rather irritated the other day watching slalom skiing.
Mr Smith goes down and gets 1m30s.
Mr Jones goes down and gets 1m29s.
Clearly Mr Jones is better, faster, less time, the winner.
But the commentator says "Mr Jones got 1 second off the pace".
Pace means speed. "Off the pace" would mean LESS speed.
But he didn't have less speed, he had MORE. He had less TIME.
How can a professional commentator get speed and time mixed up?!
Speed = distance/time while pace = time/distance, so Mr Jones did get
1 second off the pace.
I don't think I've ever heard or seen that meaning for "pace". As
far as I know, it just means "speed".
---
Running
In running, pace is usually defined as the number of minutes it takes to
cover a mile or kilometer. Pacing is often a critical aspect of endurance
events. Some coaches advocate training at a combination of specific paces
related to one's fitness in order to stimulate various physiological
improvements.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pace_(speed)
---
Ah, so it's actually the whole sports community that have it wrong.
No, it is a specialize use.
--
Major Strasser has been shot. Round up the usual suspects.
Commander Kinsey
2020-01-04 20:18:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lewis
Post by Commander Kinsey
Post by Jerry Friedman
Le samedi 4 janvier 2020 16:47:25 UTC+1, Commander Kinsey a =E9cr=
Post by Commander Kinsey
I was rather irritated the other day watching slalom skiing.
Mr Smith goes down and gets 1m30s.
Mr Jones goes down and gets 1m29s.
Clearly Mr Jones is better, faster, less time, the winner.
But the commentator says "Mr Jones got 1 second off the pace".
Pace means speed. "Off the pace" would mean LESS speed.
But he didn't have less speed, he had MORE. He had less TIME.
How can a professional commentator get speed and time mixed up?=
!
Post by Lewis
Post by Commander Kinsey
Post by Jerry Friedman
Speed =3D distance/time while pace =3D time/distance, so Mr Jones=
did get
Post by Lewis
Post by Commander Kinsey
Post by Jerry Friedman
1 second off the pace.
I don't think I've ever heard or seen that meaning for "pace". As
far as I know, it just means "speed".
Not an uncommon meaning of the word in sports. For instance, Wiki sa=
---
Running
In running, pace is usually defined as the number of minutes it take=
s to
Post by Lewis
Post by Commander Kinsey
cover a mile or kilometer. Pacing is often a critical aspect of endu=
rance
Post by Lewis
Post by Commander Kinsey
events. Some coaches advocate training at a combination of specific =
paces
Post by Lewis
Post by Commander Kinsey
related to one's fitness in order to stimulate various physiological=
improvements.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pace_(speed)
---
Ah, so it's actually the whole sports community that have it wrong.
No, it is a specialize use.
It's fine using a word to mean something else entirely, people will just=
have to look it up. But what they're doing is giving it precisely the =
opposite meaning, then using that for people watching the event on TV wh=
o are probably not professional sportsmen, and speak normal English, not=
the sports version. So everyone thinks the skier went slower when in f=
act he went faster. Changing the meaning of an English word shows lack =
of intelligence and I expect better from someone working in broadcasting=
.
Lewis
2020-01-05 16:33:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by Commander Kinsey
Post by Lewis
Post by Commander Kinsey
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Commander Kinsey
I was rather irritated the other day watching slalom skiing.
Mr Smith goes down and gets 1m30s.
Mr Jones goes down and gets 1m29s.
Clearly Mr Jones is better, faster, less time, the winner.
But the commentator says "Mr Jones got 1 second off the pace".
Pace means speed. "Off the pace" would mean LESS speed.
But he didn't have less speed, he had MORE. He had less TIME.
How can a professional commentator get speed and time mixed up?!
Speed = distance/time while pace = time/distance, so Mr Jones did get
1 second off the pace.
I don't think I've ever heard or seen that meaning for "pace". As
far as I know, it just means "speed".
---
Running
In running, pace is usually defined as the number of minutes it takes to
cover a mile or kilometer. Pacing is often a critical aspect of endurance
events. Some coaches advocate training at a combination of specific paces
related to one's fitness in order to stimulate various physiological
improvements.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pace_(speed)
---
Ah, so it's actually the whole sports community that have it wrong.
No, it is a specialize use.
It's fine using a word to mean something else entirely, people will
just have to look it up. But what they're doing is giving it
precisely the opposite meaning, then using that for people watching
the event on TV who are probably not professional sportsmen, and speak
normal English, not the sports version. So everyone thinks the skier
went slower when in fact he went faster. Changing the meaning of an
English word shows lack of intelligence and I expect better from
someone working in broadcasting.
Oh noes! What are we gong to do about cleave and cleave! It's MADNESS I
TELLS YOU! Bound means to leap and to be tied, what the hell is going
on with this language! When I dust am I REMOVING dust or ADDING dust? I
said e need to table this discussion and here you are talking about it
now?

Also, you might want to consult better dictionaries:

pace1 | peɪs |
noun
1 a single step taken when walking or running: Kirov stepped back a
pace. • a unit of length representing the distance between two
successive steps in walking. • a gait of a horse or other animal,
especially one of the recognized trained gaits of a horse. • literary a
person's manner of walking or running: I steal with quiet pace.

2 consistent and continuous speed in walking, running, or moving: most
traffic moved at the pace of the riverboat | [in singular] : walking at
a comfortably fast pace. • the speed or rate at which something
happens, changes, or develops: the children work separately in the
classroom at their own pace | the poor neighborhoods fester at an
increasingly rapid pace.
--
"Why do you sit there looking like an envelope without any address on
it?" - Mark Twain
Peeler
2020-01-05 18:58:28 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 5 Jan 2020 16:33:35 -0000 (UTC), Lewis, another mentally challenged,
Post by Lewis
Post by Commander Kinsey
English word shows lack of intelligence and I expect better from
someone working in broadcasting.
Oh noes! What are we gong to do about cleave and cleave!
Oh, no! What are we going to do about all you mentally challenged
troll-feeding senile assholes? Put you all in an old people's home, where
you belonged all along?
Commander Kinsey
2020-01-05 23:02:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by Commander Kinsey
Post by Lewis
Le samedi 4 janvier 2020 19:02:30 UTC+1, Jerry Friedman a =C3=A9cr=
Le samedi 4 janvier 2020 16:47:25 UTC+1, Commander Kinsey a =C3=
Post by Commander Kinsey
I was rather irritated the other day watching slalom skiing.
Mr Smith goes down and gets 1m30s.
Mr Jones goes down and gets 1m29s.
Clearly Mr Jones is better, faster, less time, the winner.
But the commentator says "Mr Jones got 1 second off the pace"=
.
Post by Commander Kinsey
Post by Lewis
Post by Commander Kinsey
Pace means speed. "Off the pace" would mean LESS speed.
But he didn't have less speed, he had MORE. He had less TIME=
.
Post by Commander Kinsey
Post by Lewis
Post by Commander Kinsey
How can a professional commentator get speed and time mixed u=
p?!
Post by Commander Kinsey
Post by Lewis
Speed =3D distance/time while pace =3D time/distance, so Mr Jon=
es did get
Post by Commander Kinsey
Post by Lewis
1 second off the pace.
I don't think I've ever heard or seen that meaning for "pace". A=
s
Post by Commander Kinsey
Post by Lewis
far as I know, it just means "speed".
Not an uncommon meaning of the word in sports. For instance, Wiki =
---
Running
In running, pace is usually defined as the number of minutes it ta=
kes to
Post by Commander Kinsey
Post by Lewis
cover a mile or kilometer. Pacing is often a critical aspect of en=
durance
Post by Commander Kinsey
Post by Lewis
events. Some coaches advocate training at a combination of specifi=
c paces
Post by Commander Kinsey
Post by Lewis
related to one's fitness in order to stimulate various physiologic=
al
Post by Commander Kinsey
Post by Lewis
improvements.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pace_(speed)
---
Ah, so it's actually the whole sports community that have it wrong.=
No, it is a specialize use.
It's fine using a word to mean something else entirely, people will
just have to look it up. But what they're doing is giving it
precisely the opposite meaning, then using that for people watching
the event on TV who are probably not professional sportsmen, and spea=
k
Post by Commander Kinsey
normal English, not the sports version. So everyone thinks the skier=
went slower when in fact he went faster. Changing the meaning of an
English word shows lack of intelligence and I expect better from
someone working in broadcasting.
Oh noes! What are we gong to do about cleave and cleave! It's MADNESS =
I
TELLS YOU! Bound means to leap and to be tied, what the hell is going
on with this language! When I dust am I REMOVING dust or ADDING dust? =
I
said e need to table this discussion and here you are talking about it=
now?
Yip, English is fucked up. But there's no need for dimwit commentators =
to make it even worse.
pace1 | pe=C9=AAs |
noun
1 a single step taken when walking or running: Kirov stepped back a
pace.
Cannot apply when talking about skiing races.
=E2=80=A2 a unit of length representing the distance between two
successive steps in walking.
Cannot apply when talking about skiing races.
=E2=80=A2 a gait of a horse or other animal,
especially one of the recognized trained gaits of a horse.
Cannot apply when talking about skiing races.
=E2=80=A2 literary a
person's manner of walking or running: I steal with quiet pace.
Cannot apply when talking about skiing races.
2 consistent and continuous speed
There you go, SPEED, like I said.
in walking, running, or moving: most
traffic moved at the pace of the riverboat | [in singular] : walking a=
t
a comfortably fast pace. =E2=80=A2 the speed
Like I said, SPEED.
or rate at which something
happens, changes, or develops: the children work separately in the
classroom at their own pace | the poor neighborhoods fester at an
increasingly rapid pace.
RATE =3D SPEED.

So, what you quoted is either irrelevant or agrees with me. Try harder.=
b***@aol.com
2020-01-06 05:45:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lewis
Post by Commander Kinsey
Post by Lewis
Post by Commander Kinsey
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Commander Kinsey
I was rather irritated the other day watching slalom skiing.
Mr Smith goes down and gets 1m30s.
Mr Jones goes down and gets 1m29s.
Clearly Mr Jones is better, faster, less time, the winner.
But the commentator says "Mr Jones got 1 second off the pace".
Pace means speed. "Off the pace" would mean LESS speed.
But he didn't have less speed, he had MORE. He had less TIME.
How can a professional commentator get speed and time mixed up?!
Speed = distance/time while pace = time/distance, so Mr Jones did get
1 second off the pace.
I don't think I've ever heard or seen that meaning for "pace". As
far as I know, it just means "speed".
---
Running
In running, pace is usually defined as the number of minutes it takes to
cover a mile or kilometer. Pacing is often a critical aspect of endurance
events. Some coaches advocate training at a combination of specific paces
related to one's fitness in order to stimulate various physiological
improvements.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pace_(speed)
---
Ah, so it's actually the whole sports community that have it wrong.
No, it is a specialize use.
It's fine using a word to mean something else entirely, people will
just have to look it up. But what they're doing is giving it
precisely the opposite meaning, then using that for people watching
the event on TV who are probably not professional sportsmen, and speak
normal English, not the sports version. So everyone thinks the skier
went slower when in fact he went faster. Changing the meaning of an
English word shows lack of intelligence and I expect better from
someone working in broadcasting.
Oh noes! What are we gong to do about cleave and cleave! It's MADNESS I
TELLS YOU! Bound means to leap and to be tied, what the hell is going
on with this language! When I dust am I REMOVING dust or ADDING dust? I
said e need to table this discussion and here you are talking about it
now?
Yip, English is fucked up. But there's no need for dimwit commentators to make it even worse.
Post by Lewis
pace1 | peɪs |
noun
1 a single step taken when walking or running: Kirov stepped back a
pace.
Cannot apply when talking about skiing races.
Post by Lewis
• a unit of length representing the distance between two
successive steps in walking.
Cannot apply when talking about skiing races.
Post by Lewis
• a gait of a horse or other animal,
especially one of the recognized trained gaits of a horse.
Cannot apply when talking about skiing races.
Post by Lewis
• literary a
person's manner of walking or running: I steal with quiet pace.
Cannot apply when talking about skiing races.
Post by Lewis
2 consistent and continuous speed
There you go, SPEED, like I said.
Post by Lewis
in walking, running, or moving: most
traffic moved at the pace of the riverboat | [in singular] : walking at
a comfortably fast pace. • the speed
Like I said, SPEED.
Post by Lewis
or rate at which something
happens, changes, or develops: the children work separately in the
classroom at their own pace | the poor neighborhoods fester at an
increasingly rapid pace.
RATE = SPEED.
So, what you quoted is either irrelevant or agrees with me. Try harder.
http://exercise.bizcalcs.com/Calculator.asp?Calc=Speed-To-Pace-Conversion
Peeler
2020-01-06 09:23:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by b***@aol.com
http://exercise.bizcalcs.com/Calculator.asp?Calc=Speed-To-Pace-Conversion
There's NO bait idiotic and silly enough that you senile idiots will NOT
take, eh, ***@aol.com? <BG>
Commander Kinsey
2020-01-06 20:07:03 UTC
Permalink
Le lundi 6 janvier 2020 00:02:26 UTC+1, Commander Kinsey a =C3=A9crit =
Post by Lewis
Le samedi 4 janvier 2020 19:02:30 UTC+1, Jerry Friedman a =C3=A9=
Le samedi 4 janvier 2020 16:47:25 UTC+1, Commander Kinsey a =
I was rather irritated the other day watching slalom skiin=
g.
Post by Lewis
Mr Smith goes down and gets 1m30s.
Mr Jones goes down and gets 1m29s.
Clearly Mr Jones is better, faster, less time, the winner.=
But the commentator says "Mr Jones got 1 second off the pa=
ce".
Post by Lewis
Pace means speed. "Off the pace" would mean LESS speed.
But he didn't have less speed, he had MORE. He had less T=
IME.
Post by Lewis
How can a professional commentator get speed and time mixe=
d up?!
Post by Lewis
Speed =3D distance/time while pace =3D time/distance, so Mr =
Jones did get
Post by Lewis
1 second off the pace.
I don't think I've ever heard or seen that meaning for "pace".=
As
Post by Lewis
far as I know, it just means "speed".
Not an uncommon meaning of the word in sports. For instance, Wi=
---
Running
In running, pace is usually defined as the number of minutes it=
takes to
Post by Lewis
cover a mile or kilometer. Pacing is often a critical aspect of=
endurance
Post by Lewis
events. Some coaches advocate training at a combination of spec=
ific paces
Post by Lewis
related to one's fitness in order to stimulate various physiolo=
gical
Post by Lewis
improvements.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pace_(speed)
---
Ah, so it's actually the whole sports community that have it wro=
ng.
Post by Lewis
No, it is a specialize use.
It's fine using a word to mean something else entirely, people wil=
l
just have to look it up. But what they're doing is giving it
precisely the opposite meaning, then using that for people watchin=
g
the event on TV who are probably not professional sportsmen, and s=
peak
normal English, not the sports version. So everyone thinks the sk=
ier
went slower when in fact he went faster. Changing the meaning of =
an
English word shows lack of intelligence and I expect better from
someone working in broadcasting.
Oh noes! What are we gong to do about cleave and cleave! It's MADNE=
SS I
TELLS YOU! Bound means to leap and to be tied, what the hell is goi=
ng
on with this language! When I dust am I REMOVING dust or ADDING dus=
t? I
said e need to table this discussion and here you are talking about=
it
now?
Yip, English is fucked up. But there's no need for dimwit commentato=
rs to make it even worse.
pace1 | pe=C9=AAs |
noun
1 a single step taken when walking or running: Kirov stepped back a=
pace.
Cannot apply when talking about skiing races.
=E2=80=A2 a unit of length representing the distance between two
successive steps in walking.
Cannot apply when talking about skiing races.
=E2=80=A2 a gait of a horse or other animal,
especially one of the recognized trained gaits of a horse.
Cannot apply when talking about skiing races.
=E2=80=A2 literary a
person's manner of walking or running: I steal with quiet pace.
Cannot apply when talking about skiing races.
2 consistent and continuous speed
There you go, SPEED, like I said.
in walking, running, or moving: most
traffic moved at the pace of the riverboat | [in singular] : walkin=
g at
a comfortably fast pace. =E2=80=A2 the speed
Like I said, SPEED.
or rate at which something
happens, changes, or develops: the children work separately in the
classroom at their own pace | the poor neighborhoods fester at an
increasingly rapid pace.
RATE =3D SPEED.
So, what you quoted is either irrelevant or agrees with me. Try hard=
er.
http://exercise.bizcalcs.com/Calculator.asp?Calc=3DSpeed-To-Pace-Conve=
rsion

That is a ridiculous meaning of pace used by virtually nobody. Seconds =
per mile indeed.
b***@aol.com
2020-01-06 23:17:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Lewis
Post by Commander Kinsey
Post by Lewis
Post by Commander Kinsey
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Commander Kinsey
I was rather irritated the other day watching slalom skiing.
Mr Smith goes down and gets 1m30s.
Mr Jones goes down and gets 1m29s.
Clearly Mr Jones is better, faster, less time, the winner.
But the commentator says "Mr Jones got 1 second off the pace".
Pace means speed. "Off the pace" would mean LESS speed.
But he didn't have less speed, he had MORE. He had less TIME.
How can a professional commentator get speed and time mixed up?!
Speed = distance/time while pace = time/distance, so Mr Jones did get
1 second off the pace.
I don't think I've ever heard or seen that meaning for "pace". As
far as I know, it just means "speed".
---
Running
In running, pace is usually defined as the number of minutes it takes to
cover a mile or kilometer. Pacing is often a critical aspect of endurance
events. Some coaches advocate training at a combination of specific paces
related to one's fitness in order to stimulate various physiological
improvements.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pace_(speed)
---
Ah, so it's actually the whole sports community that have it wrong.
No, it is a specialize use.
It's fine using a word to mean something else entirely, people will
just have to look it up. But what they're doing is giving it
precisely the opposite meaning, then using that for people watching
the event on TV who are probably not professional sportsmen, and speak
normal English, not the sports version. So everyone thinks the skier
went slower when in fact he went faster. Changing the meaning of an
English word shows lack of intelligence and I expect better from
someone working in broadcasting.
Oh noes! What are we gong to do about cleave and cleave! It's MADNESS I
TELLS YOU! Bound means to leap and to be tied, what the hell is going
on with this language! When I dust am I REMOVING dust or ADDING dust? I
said e need to table this discussion and here you are talking about it
now?
Yip, English is fucked up. But there's no need for dimwit commentators to make it even worse.
Post by Lewis
pace1 | peɪs |
noun
1 a single step taken when walking or running: Kirov stepped back a
pace.
Cannot apply when talking about skiing races.
Post by Lewis
• a unit of length representing the distance between two
successive steps in walking.
Cannot apply when talking about skiing races.
Post by Lewis
• a gait of a horse or other animal,
especially one of the recognized trained gaits of a horse.
Cannot apply when talking about skiing races.
Post by Lewis
• literary a
person's manner of walking or running: I steal with quiet pace.
Cannot apply when talking about skiing races.
Post by Lewis
2 consistent and continuous speed
There you go, SPEED, like I said.
Post by Lewis
in walking, running, or moving: most
traffic moved at the pace of the riverboat | [in singular] : walking at
a comfortably fast pace. • the speed
Like I said, SPEED.
Post by Lewis
or rate at which something
happens, changes, or develops: the children work separately in the
classroom at their own pace | the poor neighborhoods fester at an
increasingly rapid pace.
RATE = SPEED.
So, what you quoted is either irrelevant or agrees with me. Try harder.
http://exercise.bizcalcs.com/Calculator.asp?Calc=Speed-To-Pace-Conversion
That is a ridiculous meaning of pace used by virtually nobody. Seconds per mile indeed.
But there's a need for a generic term matching all time and distance
units, and "pace" is the only one that comes to mind.
Peeler
2020-01-06 23:37:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by b***@aol.com
But there's a need for a generic term matching all time and distance
units, and "pace" is the only one that comes to mind.
"Troll-feeding senile asshole and Google groper" comes to mind, senile
moron!
b***@shaw.ca
2020-01-07 09:01:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peeler
Post by b***@aol.com
But there's a need for a generic term matching all time and distance
units, and "pace" is the only one that comes to mind.
"Troll-feeding senile asshole and Google groper" comes to mind, senile
moron!
Still, you have to admit that by any reasonable definition,
you are the most prolific troll in the group.

bill
Peeler
2020-01-07 11:02:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by b***@shaw.ca
Post by Peeler
"Troll-feeding senile asshole and Google groper" comes to mind, senile
moron!
Still, you have to admit that by any reasonable definition,
you are the most prolific troll in the group.
ONLY in your troll-feeding senile Google groper's head, idjit!
Peter T. Daniels
2020-01-07 14:25:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peeler
Post by b***@shaw.ca
Post by Peeler
"Troll-feeding senile asshole and Google groper" comes to mind, senile
moron!
Still, you have to admit that by any reasonable definition,
you are the most prolific troll in the group.
ONLY in your troll-feeding senile Google groper's head, idjit!
No, because every time your buddy posts a message, you post several
messages in response. (That's like saying there are more integers
than even integers, but still ...)
Peeler
2020-01-07 15:31:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Peeler
ONLY in your troll-feeding senile Google groper's head, idjit!
No, because every time your buddy posts a message, you post several
messages in response. (That's like saying there are more integers
than even integers, but still ...)
What are you NOW hallucinating about again, senile twit?
Fucking (or rather non-fucking) stupid seniles! LOL
Lewis
2020-01-07 01:52:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by Commander Kinsey
Post by b***@aol.com
http://exercise.bizcalcs.com/Calculator.asp?Calc=Speed-To-Pace-Conversion
That is a ridiculous meaning of pace used by virtually nobody.
Seconds per mile indeed.
You are wrong, as has been pointed out to you many times.
--
'Nothing works against magic. Except stronger magic. And then the
only thing that beats stronger magic is even stronger magic. And
the next thing you know...' 'Phooey?' --Sourcery
Peeler
2020-01-07 09:27:24 UTC
Permalink
On Tue, 7 Jan 2020 01:52:55 -0000 (UTC), Lewis, another brain dead,
Post by Lewis
Post by Commander Kinsey
That is a ridiculous meaning of pace used by virtually nobody.
Seconds per mile indeed.
You are wrong, as has been pointed out to you many times.
He's a TROLL, for God's sake! And it has been pointed out to all of you many
times, by all kinds of people! <tsk>
Commander Kinsey
2020-01-07 23:42:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lewis
Post by Commander Kinsey
Post by b***@aol.com
http://exercise.bizcalcs.com/Calculator.asp?Calc=Speed-To-Pace-Conversion
That is a ridiculous meaning of pace used by virtually nobody.
Seconds per mile indeed.
You are wrong, as has been pointed out to you many times.
You can't have a word possibly meaning its opposite. Should we also start saying fast when we mean slow?
Peter T. Daniels
2020-01-08 15:45:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by Commander Kinsey
You can't have a word possibly meaning its opposite. Should we also start saying fast when we mean slow?
You don't know what "the bolt is stuck fast in the hole" means?
Peeler
2020-01-08 17:09:03 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 8 Jan 2020 07:45:06 -0800 (PST), Peter T. Daniels, the demented
Post by Peter T. Daniels
You don't know what "the bolt is stuck fast in the hole" means?
You STILL don't know that you are feeding a clinically insane TROLL, senile
idiot? Just HOW senile are you?
Commander Kinsey
2020-01-18 22:11:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Commander Kinsey
You can't have a word possibly meaning its opposite. Should we also start saying fast when we mean slow?
You don't know what "the bolt is stuck fast in the hole" means?
Clear from context. The word stuck is a big clue. But "off the pace" means what? It could be faster or slower.
b***@aol.com
2020-01-08 18:42:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by Commander Kinsey
Post by Lewis
Post by Commander Kinsey
Post by b***@aol.com
http://exercise.bizcalcs.com/Calculator.asp?Calc=Speed-To-Pace-Conversion
That is a ridiculous meaning of pace used by virtually nobody.
Seconds per mile indeed.
You are wrong, as has been pointed out to you many times.
You can't have a word possibly meaning its opposite.
Can't you?

---
Definition of contronym
: a word having two meanings that contradict one another

https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/contranym
---
Post by Commander Kinsey
Should we also start saying fast when we mean slow?
Why not, antiphrases aren't so rare.
Kerr-Mudd,John
2020-01-08 18:57:52 UTC
Permalink
Le mercredi 8 janvier 2020 00:42:26 UTC+1, Commander Kinsey a
On Tue, 07 Jan 2020 01:52:55 -0000, Lewis
Post by Lewis
Post by Commander Kinsey
Post by b***@aol.com
http://exercise.bizcalcs.com/Calculator.asp?Calc=Speed-To-Pace-Con
v
ersion
Post by Lewis
Post by Commander Kinsey
That is a ridiculous meaning of pace used by virtually nobody.
Seconds per mile indeed.
You are wrong, as has been pointed out to you many times.
You can't have a word possibly meaning its opposite.
Can't you?
---
Definition of contronym
: a word having two meanings that contradict one another
https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/contranym
---
Should we also start saying fast when we mean slow?
Cool! and when I say that I mean "red hot"!
Why not, antiphrases aren't so rare.
--
Bah, and indeed, Humbug.
Commander Kinsey
2020-01-18 22:10:51 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
Le mercredi 8 janvier 2020 00:42:26 UTC+1, Commander Kinsey a
On Tue, 07 Jan 2020 01:52:55 -0000, Lewis
Post by Lewis
Post by Commander Kinsey
http://exercise.bizcalcs.com/Calculator.asp?Calc=3DSpeed-To-Pace=
-Con
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
Post by Lewis
Post by Commander Kinsey
v
ersion
Post by Lewis
Post by Commander Kinsey
That is a ridiculous meaning of pace used by virtually nobody.
Seconds per mile indeed.
You are wrong, as has been pointed out to you many times.
You can't have a word possibly meaning its opposite.
Can't you?
---
Definition of contronym
: a word having two meanings that contradict one another
https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/contranym
---
Should we also start saying fast when we mean slow?
Cool! and when I say that I mean "red hot"!
As in gorgeous or liable to cause skin damage? At least with that you c=
an tell from context - a hot woman is likely to be the former. But "off=
the pace" apparently could mean slower or faster, so conveys zero infor=
mation.
Peeler
2020-01-08 20:31:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by b***@aol.com
Why not, antiphrases aren't so rare.
They can't be as rare as you two rare idiots! <tsk>
Commander Kinsey
2020-01-18 22:09:39 UTC
Permalink
Le mercredi 8 janvier 2020 00:42:26 UTC+1, Commander Kinsey a =E9crit =
Post by Commander Kinsey
Post by Lewis
Post by Commander Kinsey
http://exercise.bizcalcs.com/Calculator.asp?Calc=3DSpeed-To-Pace-=
Conversion
Post by Commander Kinsey
Post by Lewis
Post by Commander Kinsey
That is a ridiculous meaning of pace used by virtually nobody.
Seconds per mile indeed.
You are wrong, as has been pointed out to you many times.
You can't have a word possibly meaning its opposite.
Can't you?
---
Definition of contronym
: a word having two meanings that contradict one another
https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/contranym
---
You misunderstood me. I wasn't using "can't" in that manner. I meant a=
s in "You can't be doing that or you'll die" - can't meaning "shouldn't"=
.

Actually I regret saying it now, I had a go at an Irish builder once. H=
e was a contractor at my place of work. I walked through part of the wo=
rksite (I worked in the building in IT, he was just doing an extension j=
ob). I required to go through a corridor he was renovating to check on =
a server. He got very annoyed because I'm an atheist and don't believe =
in health and softy - I hadn't put on their silly hi vis jackets and hel=
mets. He said "You can't be in here". I said "Obviously I can, as I am=
, you mean I'm not supposed to be". When I asked how many bloody safety=
officers they had, he said they all were. So I said perhaps if they sp=
ent more time building and less time watching each other the job would h=
ave been completed on time.
Post by Commander Kinsey
Should we also start saying fast when we mean slow?
Why not, antiphrases aren't so rare.
So I say "my car is faster than yours", and you accept that I could be m=
eaning faster or slower? So all you know is they operate at different s=
peeds. Not very useful.
Lewis
2020-01-09 22:03:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by Commander Kinsey
Post by Lewis
Post by Commander Kinsey
Post by b***@aol.com
http://exercise.bizcalcs.com/Calculator.asp?Calc=Speed-To-Pace-Conversion
That is a ridiculous meaning of pace used by virtually nobody.
Seconds per mile indeed.
You are wrong, as has been pointed out to you many times.
You can't have a word possibly meaning its opposite.
Of course you can. Not only can you, it is quite common.
--
"Are you pondering what I'm pondering?"
"Uh, I think so, Brain--but after eating newspaper all day, do I
really need the extra fiber?"
Peeler
2020-01-09 22:32:25 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 9 Jan 2020 22:03:28 -0000 (UTC), Lewis, another absolutely brain
Post by Lewis
Of course you can. Not only can you, it is quite common.
All he can do is bait all you senile, driveling idiots for attention. And
he's obviously VERY good at it, at least in this group.
Commander Kinsey
2020-01-10 01:44:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lewis
Post by Commander Kinsey
Post by Lewis
Post by Commander Kinsey
Post by b***@aol.com
http://exercise.bizcalcs.com/Calculator.asp?Calc=Speed-To-Pace-Conversion
That is a ridiculous meaning of pace used by virtually nobody.
Seconds per mile indeed.
You are wrong, as has been pointed out to you many times.
You can't have a word possibly meaning its opposite.
Of course you can. Not only can you, it is quite common.
But you shouldn't, especially when it's only idiot commentators that use it.
Lewis
2020-01-12 05:43:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by Commander Kinsey
Post by Lewis
Post by Commander Kinsey
Post by Lewis
Post by Commander Kinsey
Post by b***@aol.com
http://exercise.bizcalcs.com/Calculator.asp?Calc=Speed-To-Pace-Conversion
That is a ridiculous meaning of pace used by virtually nobody.
Seconds per mile indeed.
You are wrong, as has been pointed out to you many times.
You can't have a word possibly meaning its opposite.
Of course you can. Not only can you, it is quite common.
But you shouldn't, especially when it's only idiot commentators that use it.
Perhaps you should learn something, anything at all, about English?
--
A bartender is just a pharmacist with a limited inventory.
Peeler
2020-01-12 08:49:22 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 12 Jan 2020 05:43:19 -0000 (UTC), Lewis, another absolutely brain
Post by Lewis
Perhaps you should learn something, anything at all, about English?
Perhaps YOU should learn NOT to feed a PROVEN clinically insane trolling
asshole, every time it wants to be fed, senile asshole!
Commander Kinsey
2020-01-12 23:53:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lewis
Post by Commander Kinsey
Post by Lewis
Post by Commander Kinsey
Post by Lewis
Post by Commander Kinsey
Post by b***@aol.com
http://exercise.bizcalcs.com/Calculator.asp?Calc=Speed-To-Pace-Conversion
That is a ridiculous meaning of pace used by virtually nobody.
Seconds per mile indeed.
You are wrong, as has been pointed out to you many times.
You can't have a word possibly meaning its opposite.
Of course you can. Not only can you, it is quite common.
But you shouldn't, especially when it's only idiot commentators that use it.
Perhaps you should learn something, anything at all, about English?
I know more than the idiot commentators. I can be easily understood. Using a word to mean the opposite of what it does to most of the population is monumentally stupid.
Lewis
2020-01-13 03:13:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by Commander Kinsey
Post by Lewis
Post by Commander Kinsey
Post by Lewis
Post by Commander Kinsey
Post by Lewis
Post by Commander Kinsey
Post by b***@aol.com
http://exercise.bizcalcs.com/Calculator.asp?Calc=Speed-To-Pace-Conversion
That is a ridiculous meaning of pace used by virtually nobody.
Seconds per mile indeed.
You are wrong, as has been pointed out to you many times.
You can't have a word possibly meaning its opposite.
Of course you can. Not only can you, it is quite common.
But you shouldn't, especially when it's only idiot commentators that use it.
Perhaps you should learn something, anything at all, about English?
I know more than the idiot commentators.
Not based on the comments you've made repeatedly in this thread.
Post by Commander Kinsey
I can be easily understood. Using a word to mean the opposite of what
it does to most of the population is monumentally stupid.
You seem to be the only person confused by this while other English
speakers have had no problem with this concept for many hundreds of
years.
--
And she was drifting through the backyard And she was taking off her
dress And she was moving very slowly Rising up above the earth
Peeler
2020-01-13 10:53:56 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 13 Jan 2020 03:13:58 -0000 (UTC), Lewis, another absolutely brain
Post by Lewis
You seem to be the only person confused by this while other English
speakers have had no problem with this concept for many hundreds of
years.
YOU seem to be one of the VERY few persons who refuse to acknowledge what
the matter is with that sociopathic trolling attention whore! Must have to
do with the degree of your senility!
Commander Kinsey
2020-01-18 22:04:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lewis
Post by Commander Kinsey
Post by Lewis
Post by Commander Kinsey
Post by Lewis
Post by Commander Kinsey
Post by Lewis
Post by Commander Kinsey
Post by b***@aol.com
http://exercise.bizcalcs.com/Calculator.asp?Calc=Speed-To-Pace-Conversion
That is a ridiculous meaning of pace used by virtually nobody.
Seconds per mile indeed.
You are wrong, as has been pointed out to you many times.
You can't have a word possibly meaning its opposite.
Of course you can. Not only can you, it is quite common.
But you shouldn't, especially when it's only idiot commentators that use it.
Perhaps you should learn something, anything at all, about English?
I know more than the idiot commentators.
Not based on the comments you've made repeatedly in this thread.
"I'm running at a faster pace than you". Pace obviously means speed. To mean it to use the exact opposite is moronic.
Post by Lewis
Post by Commander Kinsey
I can be easily understood. Using a word to mean the opposite of what
it does to most of the population is monumentally stupid.
You seem to be the only person confused by this while other English
speakers have had no problem with this concept for many hundreds of
years.
People are confused all the time when it's unclear what the other person means by a particular word.
Lewis
2020-01-18 23:13:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by Commander Kinsey
Post by Lewis
Post by Commander Kinsey
Post by Lewis
Post by Commander Kinsey
Post by Lewis
Post by Commander Kinsey
Post by Lewis
Post by Commander Kinsey
Post by b***@aol.com
http://exercise.bizcalcs.com/Calculator.asp?Calc=Speed-To-Pace-Conversion
That is a ridiculous meaning of pace used by virtually nobody.
Seconds per mile indeed.
You are wrong, as has been pointed out to you many times.
You can't have a word possibly meaning its opposite.
Of course you can. Not only can you, it is quite common.
But you shouldn't, especially when it's only idiot commentators that use it.
Perhaps you should learn something, anything at all, about English?
I know more than the idiot commentators.
Not based on the comments you've made repeatedly in this thread.
"I'm running at a faster pace than you". Pace obviously means speed.
To mean it to use the exact opposite is moronic.
"Cleave obviously means to split apart, to use it to join together is
moronic."

cleave1 | kliv |
split or sever (something), especially along a natural line or grain:
the large axe his father used to cleave wood for the fire. • split (a
molecule) by breaking a particular chemical bond. • [no object] Biology
(of a cell) divide: the egg cleaves to form a mulberry-shaped cluster of
cells.

cleave2 | kliv |
verb [no object] (cleave to) literary
stick fast to: Rose's mouth was dry, her tongue cleaving to the roof of
her mouth. • adhere strongly to (a particular pursuit or belief): part
of why we cleave to sports is that excellence is so measurable. •
become very strongly involved with or emotionally attached to (someone):
it was his choice to cleave to the Brownings.

Welcome to English, enjoy your stay.
--
'Where do shadows come from? That's where the wind is blowing!'
--Colour of Magic
Peeler
2020-01-18 23:43:42 UTC
Permalink
On Sat, 18 Jan 2020 23:13:41 -0000 (UTC), Lewis, another absolutely brain
Post by Lewis
"Cleave obviously means to split apart, to use it to join together is
moronic."
cleave1 | kliv |
Just what the fuck is wrong with you, you absolutely brain-dead
troll-feeding senile asshole?
Lewis
2020-01-19 08:59:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lewis
Post by Commander Kinsey
Post by Lewis
Post by Commander Kinsey
Post by Lewis
Post by Commander Kinsey
Post by Lewis
Post by Commander Kinsey
Post by Lewis
Post by Commander Kinsey
Post by b***@aol.com
http://exercise.bizcalcs.com/Calculator.asp?Calc=Speed-To-Pace-Conversion
That is a ridiculous meaning of pace used by virtually nobody.
Seconds per mile indeed.
You are wrong, as has been pointed out to you many times.
You can't have a word possibly meaning its opposite.
Of course you can. Not only can you, it is quite common.
But you shouldn't, especially when it's only idiot commentators that use it.
Perhaps you should learn something, anything at all, about English?
I know more than the idiot commentators.
Not based on the comments you've made repeatedly in this thread.
"I'm running at a faster pace than you". Pace obviously means speed.
To mean it to use the exact opposite is moronic.
"Cleave obviously means to split apart, to use it to join together is
moronic."
cleave1 | kliv |
the large axe his father used to cleave wood for the fire. • split (a
molecule) by breaking a particular chemical bond. • [no object] Biology
(of a cell) divide: the egg cleaves to form a mulberry-shaped cluster of
cells.
cleave2 | kliv |
verb [no object] (cleave to) literary
stick fast to: Rose's mouth was dry, her tongue cleaving to the roof of
her mouth. • adhere strongly to (a particular pursuit or belief): part
of why we cleave to sports is that excellence is so measurable. •
it was his choice to cleave to the Brownings.
Welcome to English, enjoy your stay.
I would never use meaning 2, I'd say adhere, stick, etc. The first is
the common one, as in a meat cleaver.
The verb to cleave is used in both senses.
--
'We get that in here some nights, when someone's had a few. Cosmic
speculation about whether the gods exist. Next thing, there's a
bolt of lightning through the door with a note wrapped round it
saying, "Yes, we do" and a pair of sandals with smoke coming
out.' (Small Gods)
Peeler
2020-01-19 11:06:44 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 19 Jan 2020 08:59:52 -0000 (UTC), Lewis, another absolutely brain
Post by Lewis
The verb to cleave is used in both senses.
You are definitely an asshole, in ALL senses of the word, senile idiot!
Commander Kinsey
2020-01-19 18:23:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lewis
Post by Lewis
Post by Commander Kinsey
I know more than the idiot commentators.
Not based on the comments you've made repeatedly in this thread.
"I'm running at a faster pace than you". Pace obviously means spee=
d.
Post by Lewis
To mean it to use the exact opposite is moronic.
"Cleave obviously means to split apart, to use it to join together i=
s
Post by Lewis
moronic."
cleave1 | kliv |
split or sever (something), especially along a natural line or grain=
the large axe his father used to cleave wood for the fire. =E2=80=A2=
split (a
Post by Lewis
molecule) by breaking a particular chemical bond. =E2=80=A2 [no obj=
ect] Biology
Post by Lewis
(of a cell) divide: the egg cleaves to form a mulberry-shaped cluste=
r of
Post by Lewis
cells.
cleave2 | kliv |
verb [no object] (cleave to) literary
stick fast to: Rose's mouth was dry, her tongue cleaving to the roof=
of
Post by Lewis
her mouth. =E2=80=A2 adhere strongly to (a particular pursuit or be=
lief): part
Post by Lewis
of why we cleave to sports is that excellence is so measurable. =E2=
=80=A2
Post by Lewis
become very strongly involved with or emotionally attached to (someo=
it was his choice to cleave to the Brownings.
Welcome to English, enjoy your stay.
I would never use meaning 2, I'd say adhere, stick, etc. The first i=
s
Post by Lewis
the common one, as in a meat cleaver.
The verb to cleave is used in both senses.
Not in my experience. I'd say meaning one is used 100 times more often =
than meaning two.

And by the way, why do people feel the need to put "to" in front of a ve=
rb when talking about it? You could have said "The verb cleave is used =
in both senses."

Kerr-Mudd,John
2020-01-10 09:24:00 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 09 Jan 2020 22:03:28 GMT, Lewis
Post by Lewis
On Tue, 07 Jan 2020 01:52:55 -0000, Lewis
Post by Lewis
Post by Commander Kinsey
Post by b***@aol.com
http://exercise.bizcalcs.com/Calculator.asp?Calc=Speed-To-Pace-Conv
ersion
That is a ridiculous meaning of pace used by virtually nobody.
Seconds per mile indeed.
You are wrong, as has been pointed out to you many times.
You can't have a word possibly meaning its opposite.
Of course you can. Not only can you, it is quite common.
"Yeah, right"

oh, and PDFTT.
--
Bah, and indeed, Humbug.
Commander Kinsey
2020-01-11 01:41:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
On Thu, 09 Jan 2020 22:03:28 GMT, Lewis
Post by Lewis
On Tue, 07 Jan 2020 01:52:55 -0000, Lewis
Post by Lewis
Post by Commander Kinsey
Post by b***@aol.com
http://exercise.bizcalcs.com/Calculator.asp?Calc=Speed-To-Pace-Conv
ersion
That is a ridiculous meaning of pace used by virtually nobody.
Seconds per mile indeed.
You are wrong, as has been pointed out to you many times.
You can't have a word possibly meaning its opposite.
Of course you can. Not only can you, it is quite common.
"Yeah, right"
That's called sarcasm an is clear from the intonation.
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
oh, and PDFTT.
Oh and stop using acronyms you stupid FIUSJCVU!
Peeler
2020-01-04 20:49:55 UTC
Permalink
On Sat, 4 Jan 2020 20:08:20 -0000 (UTC), Lewis, another mentally challenged,
Post by Lewis
Post by Commander Kinsey
Ah, so it's actually the whole sports community that have it wrong.
No, it is a specialize use.
Nope, senile idiot, it's just another bait! <tsk>
Tony Cooper
2020-01-04 23:16:00 UTC
Permalink
On Sat, 4 Jan 2020 10:02:28 -0800 (PST), Jerry Friedman
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Commander Kinsey
I was rather irritated the other day watching slalom skiing.
Mr Smith goes down and gets 1m30s.
Mr Jones goes down and gets 1m29s.
Clearly Mr Jones is better, faster, less time, the winner.
But the commentator says "Mr Jones got 1 second off the pace".
Pace means speed. "Off the pace" would mean LESS speed.
But he didn't have less speed, he had MORE. He had less TIME.
How can a professional commentator get speed and time mixed up?!
Speed = distance/time while pace = time/distance, so Mr Jones did get
1 second off the pace.
I don't think I've ever heard or seen that meaning for "pace". As
far as I know, it just means "speed".
I think it's common to sports, but the speech of
sportswriters/announcers are as deprecated in this group as a Patricia
Cornwell novel.

If the Red Sox are 50 wins/55 losses at a particular point in the
season they are "off the pace" compared to last year at the same time
when they had 60 wins/45 losses. I wouldn't stumble a bit over that.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Commander Kinsey
2020-01-04 23:22:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tony Cooper
On Sat, 4 Jan 2020 10:02:28 -0800 (PST), Jerry Friedman
Post by Jerry Friedman
Le samedi 4 janvier 2020 16:47:25 UTC+1, Commander Kinsey a =E9crit =
Post by Commander Kinsey
I was rather irritated the other day watching slalom skiing.
Mr Smith goes down and gets 1m30s.
Mr Jones goes down and gets 1m29s.
Clearly Mr Jones is better, faster, less time, the winner.
But the commentator says "Mr Jones got 1 second off the pace".
Pace means speed. "Off the pace" would mean LESS speed.
But he didn't have less speed, he had MORE. He had less TIME.
How can a professional commentator get speed and time mixed up?!
Speed =3D distance/time while pace =3D time/distance, so Mr Jones di=
d get
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Jerry Friedman
1 second off the pace.
I don't think I've ever heard or seen that meaning for "pace". As
far as I know, it just means "speed".
I think it's common to sports, but the speech of
sportswriters/announcers are as deprecated in this group as a Patricia=
Cornwell novel.
Because they're morons.
Post by Tony Cooper
If the Red Sox are 50 wins/55 losses at a particular point in the
season they are "off the pace" compared to last year at the same time
when they had 60 wins/45 losses. I wouldn't stumble a bit over that.
That example makes sense. It's the speed at which they're approaching a=
n overall win. If I'm wrong, it's because I have no fucking idea how th=
e scoring works in that silly game.
Peeler
2020-01-04 19:01:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by b***@aol.com
Speed = distance/time while pace = time/distance, so Mr Jones did get
1 second off the pace.
Mr Hucker will jerk off at least once today thinking of his latest
successful bait on aue, you troll-feeding, mentally deficient Google groper!
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