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which wolves do not
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Lazypierrot
2021-01-30 06:17:00 UTC
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I would like to know the meaning of the phrase "which wolves do not" in the following sentence. I wonder if the relative clause means a)"wolves do not have the small muscle", or b)" wolves do not raise their inner eyebrow."

Dogs have a small muscle, which allows them to raise their inner eyebrow, which wolves do not.


Cordially,

LP
Jack
2021-01-30 06:44:06 UTC
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On Fri, 29 Jan 2021 22:17:00 -0800 (PST), Lazypierrot
Post by Lazypierrot
I would like to know the meaning of the phrase "which wolves do not" in the following sentence. I wonder if the relative clause means a)"wolves do not have the small muscle", or b)" wolves do not raise their inner eyebrow."
Dogs have a small muscle, which allows them to raise their inner eyebrow, which wolves do not.
It means a), as in:
Dogs have a small muscle, which wolves do not.

For it to mean b), it would need another word:
...which allows them to raise their inner eyebrow, which wolves do not
do.

--
Ja
Peter T. Daniels
2021-01-30 13:05:29 UTC
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Post by Jack
On Fri, 29 Jan 2021 22:17:00 -0800 (PST), Lazypierrot
Post by Lazypierrot
I would like to know the meaning of the phrase "which wolves do not" in the following sentence. I wonder if the relative clause means a)"wolves do not have the small muscle", or b)" wolves do not raise their inner eyebrow."
Dogs have a small muscle, which allows them to raise their inner eyebrow, which wolves do not.
Dogs have a small muscle, which wolves do not.
...which allows them to raise their inner eyebrow, which wolves do not
do.
In BrE. AmE doesn't use that hanging pro-verb "do."
Ross Clark
2021-01-30 07:05:48 UTC
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Post by Lazypierrot
I would like to know the meaning of the phrase "which wolves do not" in the following sentence. I wonder if the relative clause means a)"wolves do not have the small muscle", or b)" wolves do not raise their inner eyebrow."
Dogs have a small muscle, which allows them to raise their inner eyebrow, which wolves do not.
Cordially,
LP
I'd say that grammatically it could support either reading, but (a) is
the only likely one. If (b) was intended, the relative clause would seem
to be saying that wolves *could* raise their inner eyebrows, but choose
not to. But how could they raise it except by having this small muscle?
And starting by saying "Dogs have a small muscle..." and then comparing
them with wolves strongly suggests that this is a way dogs and wolves
differ. If it were the case that both species have this muscle but only
dogs actually use it (or maybe wolves use it for something else), the
sentence would have to be quite differently phrased to make this clear.
Kerr-Mudd,John
2021-01-30 10:33:43 UTC
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Post by Ross Clark
Post by Lazypierrot
I would like to know the meaning of the phrase "which wolves do not"
in the following sentence. I wonder if the relative clause means
a)"wolves do not have the small muscle", or b)" wolves do not raise
their inner eyebrow."
both, IMO.
Post by Ross Clark
Post by Lazypierrot
Dogs have a small muscle, which allows them to raise their inner
eyebrow, which wolves do not.
Cordially,
LP
I'd say that grammatically it could support either reading, but (a) is
the only likely one. If (b) was intended, the relative clause would
seem to be saying that wolves *could* raise their inner eyebrows, but
choose not to. But how could they raise it except by having this small
muscle? And starting by saying "Dogs have a small muscle..." and then
comparing them with wolves strongly suggests that this is a way dogs
and wolves differ. If it were the case that both species have this
muscle but only dogs actually use it (or maybe wolves use it for
something else), the sentence would have to be quite differently
phrased to make this clear.
Clearly (:-) dogs have a small muscle; thus inferring that wolves have a
large one; but wolves chose not (or some how are unable to use it) to
move their eyebrows. Or maybe wolves just can't move dog's eyebrow
(duh!).

So I agree a rewrite would be sensible

Dogs are able to raise their inner eyebrow using a small muscle. Wolves
lack this muscle and are unable to.
(Still not optimal)
--
Bah, and indeed, Humbug.
Paul Carmichael
2021-01-30 12:06:20 UTC
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Post by Lazypierrot
I would like to know the meaning of the phrase "which wolves do not" in the following sentence. I wonder if the relative clause means a)"wolves do not have the small muscle", or b)" wolves do not raise their inner eyebrow."
Dogs have a small muscle, which allows them to raise their inner eyebrow, which wolves do not.
The second clause "allows" is singular. So plural "wolves" does not match.

But the sentence is rubbish.

How about "Thanks to a unique small muscle, dogs are able to raise their inner eyebrow".
It's unique, therefore wolves don't have it.
--
Paul.

https://paulc.es/elpatio
Lewis
2021-01-30 17:43:42 UTC
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Post by Paul Carmichael
Post by Lazypierrot
I would like to know the meaning of the phrase "which wolves do not" in the following sentence. I wonder if the relative clause means a)"wolves do not have the small muscle", or b)" wolves do not raise their inner eyebrow."
Dogs have a small muscle, which allows them to raise their inner eyebrow, which wolves do not.
The second clause "allows" is singular. So plural "wolves" does not match.
No, that is not correct.

Dogs have and wolves do not have, allows is for the muscles, not the
dogs or the wolves.
Post by Paul Carmichael
But the sentence is rubbish.
The commas certainly do not help.
Post by Paul Carmichael
How about "Thanks to a unique small muscle, dogs are able to raise their inner eyebrow".
It's unique, therefore wolves don't have it.
It's not unique based on the information we have, it is only unique
between dogs and wolves. For all we know all mammals but wolves have
this ability.
--
Something wonderful, if you took the long view, was about to happen.
If you took the short or medium view, something horrible was
about to happen. It's like the difference between seeing a
beautiful new star in the winter sky and actually being close to
the supernova. It's the difference between the beauty of morning
dew on a cobweb and actually being a fly. --Reaper Man
Paul Carmichael
2021-01-31 10:03:19 UTC
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Post by Lewis
Post by Paul Carmichael
Post by Lazypierrot
I would like to know the meaning of the phrase "which wolves do not" in the following sentence. I wonder if the relative clause means a)"wolves do not have the small muscle", or b)" wolves do not raise their inner eyebrow."
Dogs have a small muscle, which allows them to raise their inner eyebrow, which wolves do not.
The second clause "allows" is singular. So plural "wolves" does not match.
No, that is not correct.
How can you discuss "correct" versus "not correct" starting from such a nonsensical
outpouring as the above?

It's a bit like one of Yurui's questions:

Which is more correct "My hat smells green" or "My hat has cancer"?

Why did I comment? Good question. A break from music theory.
--
Paul.

https://paulc.es/elpatio
Peter Moylan
2021-01-31 10:46:40 UTC
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Post by Paul Carmichael
Post by Lewis
Post by Paul Carmichael
Post by Lazypierrot
I would like to know the meaning of the phrase "which wolves do
not" in the following sentence. I wonder if the relative clause
means a)"wolves do not have the small muscle", or b)" wolves do
not raise their inner eyebrow."
Dogs have a small muscle, which allows them to raise their
inner eyebrow, which wolves do not.
The second clause "allows" is singular. So plural "wolves" does not match.
No, that is not correct.
How can you discuss "correct" versus "not correct" starting from such
a nonsensical outpouring as the above?
Which is more correct "My hat smells green" or "My hat has cancer"?
Why did I comment? Good question. A break from music theory.
He's right, though. If we remove the parenthetical insertion then we
have "Dogs have a small muscle which wolves do not". (I'd add a "have"
at the end of that, but that's a separate question.) The "allows" is
irrelevant to that. It is singular because "muscle" is singular.

Of course it doesn't help that the original sentence is badly written
and confusing.
--
Peter Moylan Newcastle, NSW
Paul Carmichael
2021-01-31 12:41:11 UTC
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Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Paul Carmichael
Post by Lewis
Post by Paul Carmichael
Post by Lazypierrot
I would like to know the meaning of the phrase "which wolves do
not" in the following sentence. I wonder if the relative clause
means a)"wolves do not have the small muscle", or b)" wolves do
not raise their inner eyebrow."
Dogs have a small muscle, which allows them to raise their
inner eyebrow, which wolves do not.
The second clause "allows" is singular. So plural "wolves" does not match.
No, that is not correct.
How can you discuss "correct" versus "not correct" starting from such
a nonsensical outpouring as the above?
Which is more correct "My hat smells green" or "My hat has cancer"?
Why did I comment? Good question. A break from music theory.
He's right, though. If we remove the parenthetical insertion then we
have "Dogs have a small muscle which wolves do not". (I'd add a "have"
at the end of that, but that's a separate question.) The "allows" is
irrelevant to that. It is singular because "muscle" is singular.
Of course it doesn't help that the original sentence is badly written
and confusing.
But it gave me something to write in between various inversions of 7th chords.

Should have started younger.

I know, I should go where my sort are tolerated.
--
Paul.

https://paulc.es/elpatio
Ross Clark
2021-01-31 23:23:30 UTC
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Post by Paul Carmichael
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Paul Carmichael
Post by Lewis
Post by Paul Carmichael
Post by Lazypierrot
I would like to know the meaning of the phrase "which wolves do
not" in the following sentence. I wonder if the relative clause
means a)"wolves do not have the small muscle", or b)" wolves do
not raise their inner eyebrow."
Dogs have a small muscle, which allows them to raise their
inner eyebrow, which wolves do not.
The second clause "allows" is singular. So plural "wolves" does not match.
No, that is not correct.
How can you discuss "correct" versus "not correct" starting from such
a nonsensical outpouring as the above?
Which is more correct "My hat smells green" or "My hat has cancer"?
Why did I comment? Good question. A break from music theory.
He's right, though. If we remove the parenthetical insertion then we
have "Dogs have a small muscle which wolves do not". (I'd add a "have"
at the end of that, but that's a separate question.) The "allows" is
irrelevant to that. It is singular because "muscle" is singular.
Of course it doesn't help that the original sentence is badly written
and confusing.
But it gave me something to write in between various inversions of 7th chords.
Should have started younger.
I know, I should go where my sort are tolerated.
Maybe whatever part of your brain wanted to connect "wolves" as subject
with "allows" as verb was imagining that those mean wolves, for selfish
reasons, would not allow dogs to raise their inner eyebrows?

I admit it's a reading that never occurred to me until now. But I think
grammatically it would work, despite the number discrepancy you pointed
out, and a slight shift in the sense of "allow".
Lewis
2021-01-31 14:39:45 UTC
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Post by Paul Carmichael
Post by Lewis
Post by Paul Carmichael
Post by Lazypierrot
I would like to know the meaning of the phrase "which wolves do not" in the following sentence. I wonder if the relative clause means a)"wolves do not have the small muscle", or b)" wolves do not raise their inner eyebrow."
Dogs have a small muscle, which allows them to raise their inner eyebrow, which wolves do not.
The second clause "allows" is singular. So plural "wolves" does not match.
No, that is not correct.
How can you discuss "correct" versus "not correct" starting from such a nonsensical
outpouring as the above?
Because the comment about "allows" was incorrect.
--
'It is always useful to face an enemy who is prepared to die for his
country,' he read. 'This means that both you and he have exactly
the same aim in mind.'
Jerry Friedman
2021-01-31 16:06:59 UTC
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Post by Paul Carmichael
Post by Lazypierrot
I would like to know the meaning of the phrase "which wolves do not" in the following sentence. I wonder if the relative clause means a)"wolves do not have the small muscle", or b)" wolves do not raise their inner eyebrow."
Dogs have a small muscle, which allows them to raise their inner eyebrow, which wolves do not.
The second clause "allows" is singular. So plural "wolves" does not match.
But the sentence is rubbish.
How about "Thanks to a unique small muscle, dogs are able to raise their inner eyebrow".
It's unique, therefore wolves don't have it.
Maybe "Dogs can raise their inner eyebrows by using a small muscle that wolves
do not have."
--
Jerry Friedman
CDB
2021-02-01 13:57:33 UTC
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Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Paul Carmichael
Post by Lazypierrot
I would like to know the meaning of the phrase "which wolves do
not" in the following sentence. I wonder if the relative clause
means a)"wolves do not have the small muscle", or b)" wolves do
not raise their inner eyebrow."
Dogs have a small muscle, which allows them to raise their inner
eyebrow, which wolves do not.
The second clause "allows" is singular. So plural "wolves" does not match.
But the sentence is rubbish.
How about "Thanks to a unique small muscle, dogs are able to raise
their inner eyebrow". It's unique, therefore wolves don't have it.
Maybe "Dogs can raise their inner eyebrows by using a small muscle
that wolves do not have."
Or, making minimal changes, "Dogs have a small muscle which allows them
to raise their inner eyebrows, as wolves cannot/have not".

Ken Blake
2021-01-30 14:55:42 UTC
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Post by Lazypierrot
I would like to know the meaning of the phrase "which wolves do not" in the following sentence. I wonder if the relative clause means a)"wolves do not have the small muscle", or b)" wolves do not raise their inner eyebrow."
Dogs have a small muscle, which allows them to raise their inner eyebrow, which wolves do not.
In my opinion, it's a very poor sentence, which could be read either way.
--
Ken
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