Discussion:
[en-DE]"stationary"
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Stefan Ram
2019-11-02 17:21:38 UTC
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What's written on a sign in a department store
near the Berlin Alexander square (in German):

|Bitte bezahlen Sie unsere Süßwarenartikel nur an der
|Süßwarenkasse.

. What this means is (as translated by me):

|Please pay our sweets only at the candy checkout.

. What's written on their sign is:

|Confectionary has to be paid at our stationary cashpoint.

. "Stationary cashpoint" for the candy checkout?
Can "stationary" mean "candies"/"confectionery"?
Peter Young
2019-11-02 17:46:07 UTC
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Post by Stefan Ram
What's written on a sign in a department store
|Bitte bezahlen Sie unsere Süßwarenartikel nur an der
|Süßwarenkasse.
|Please pay our sweets only at the candy checkout.
|Confectionary has to be paid at our stationary cashpoint.
. "Stationary cashpoint" for the candy checkout?
Can "stationary" mean "candies"/"confectionery"?
Not in English. Did they mean "stationery? Unlikely.

The difference between there two words and their spelling does cause
confusion among some British.

"Stationary" = "Not moving.
"Stationery" = "Writing materials and so on".

ObAUE: In the school (primary school in BrE, taking children from ages
five to eleven) where my late wife used to do voluntary work, in one of
the classrooms there was a cupboard full of paper and so on. It was
labelled "Stationary cupboard". Underneath this someone had written "Well,
it hasn't moved yet".

Peter.
--
Peter Young, (BrE, RP), Consultant Anaesthetist, 1975-2004.
(US equivalent: Certified Anesthesiologist) (AUE Hg)
Cheltenham and Gloucester, UK. Now happily retired.
http://pnyoung.orpheusweb.co.uk
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2019-11-02 18:12:30 UTC
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Post by Peter Young
Post by Stefan Ram
. "Stationary cashpoint" for the candy checkout?
Can "stationary" mean "candies"/"confectionery"?
Not in English. Did they mean "stationery? Unlikely.
The spelling "stationary" was my mistake when typing the
post. I tried to fix it using a Supersedes post. Sorry!
However, I take it from you post that "stationery cashpoint"
is not a possible designation for the checkout at which the
sweets are to be paid for.
OT: I see that I ended the above sentence with a preposition.
What do you think is wrong with that? There were worse things in your
post to worry about.
A visitor to Harvard asks a professor, "Excuse me, but would
you be good enough to tell me where the Harvard Library is at?"
"Sir," came the sneering reply, "at Harvard we do not end a
sentence with a preposition."
"Well, in that case, forgive me," said the visitor. "Permit me
to rephrase my question. Would you be good enough to tell me
where the Harvard Library is at, jackass?"
The same as it was the last time it was posted here.
--
athel
Ken Blake
2019-11-02 19:31:16 UTC
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Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Peter Young
Post by Stefan Ram
. "Stationary cashpoint" for the candy checkout?
Can "stationary" mean "candies"/"confectionery"?
Not in English. Did they mean "stationery? Unlikely.
The spelling "stationary" was my mistake when typing the
post. I tried to fix it using a Supersedes post. Sorry!
However, I take it from you post that "stationery cashpoint"
is not a possible designation for the checkout at which the
sweets are to be paid for.
OT: I see that I ended the above sentence with a preposition.
What do you think is wrong with that? There were worse things in your
post to worry about.
A visitor to Harvard asks a professor, "Excuse me, but would
you be good enough to tell me where the Harvard Library is at?"
"Sir," came the sneering reply, "at Harvard we do not end a
sentence with a preposition."
"Well, in that case, forgive me," said the visitor. "Permit me
to rephrase my question. Would you be good enough to tell me
where the Harvard Library is at, jackass?"
The same as it was the last time it was posted here.
But different from the way I heard it: it was on a NYC subway platform
asking where the train was at, and the last word was "asshole."
--
Ken
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2019-11-02 19:45:05 UTC
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Post by Ken Blake
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Peter Young
Post by Stefan Ram
. "Stationary cashpoint" for the candy checkout?
Can "stationary" mean "candies"/"confectionery"?
Not in English. Did they mean "stationery? Unlikely.
The spelling "stationary" was my mistake when typing the
post. I tried to fix it using a Supersedes post. Sorry!
However, I take it from you post that "stationery cashpoint"
is not a possible designation for the checkout at which the
sweets are to be paid for.
OT: I see that I ended the above sentence with a preposition.
What do you think is wrong with that? There were worse things in your
post to worry about.
A visitor to Harvard asks a professor, "Excuse me, but would
you be good enough to tell me where the Harvard Library is at?"
"Sir," came the sneering reply, "at Harvard we do not end a
sentence with a preposition."
"Well, in that case, forgive me," said the visitor. "Permit me
to rephrase my question. Would you be good enough to tell me
where the Harvard Library is at, jackass?"
The same as it was the last time it was posted here.
But different from the way I heard it: it was on a NYC subway platform
asking where the train was at, and the last word was "asshole."
That version may well exist, but the one I remember concerned Harvard
and a jackass.
--
athel
Peter Moylan
2019-11-02 21:49:19 UTC
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Post by Ken Blake
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Peter Young
. "Stationary cashpoint" for the candy checkout? Can
"stationary" mean "candies"/"confectionery"?
Not in English. Did they mean "stationery? Unlikely.
The spelling "stationary" was my mistake when typing the post. I
tried to fix it using a Supersedes post. Sorry!
However, I take it from you post that "stationery cashpoint" is
not a possible designation for the checkout at which the sweets
are to be paid for.
OT: I see that I ended the above sentence with a preposition.
What do you think is wrong with that? There were worse things in
your post to worry about.
A visitor to Harvard asks a professor, "Excuse me, but would you
be good enough to tell me where the Harvard Library is at?"
"Sir," came the sneering reply, "at Harvard we do not end a
sentence with a preposition."
"Well, in that case, forgive me," said the visitor. "Permit me to
rephrase my question. Would you be good enough to tell me where
the Harvard Library is at, jackass?"
The same as it was the last time it was posted here.
But different from the way I heard it: it was on a NYC subway
platform asking where the train was at, and the last word was
"asshole."
Agreed. In the world of jokes, Harvard is the place where they wash
their hands after urinating.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Madhu
2019-11-03 09:42:53 UTC
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Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Peter Young
. "Stationary cashpoint" for the candy checkout? Can
"stationary" mean "candies"/"confectionery"?
Not in English. Did they mean "stationery? Unlikely.
The spelling "stationary" was my mistake when typing the post. I
tried to fix it using a Supersedes post. Sorry!
However, I take it from you post that "stationery cashpoint" is
not a possible designation for the checkout at which the sweets
are to be paid for.
OT: I see that I ended the above sentence with a preposition.
What do you think is wrong with that? There were worse things in
your post to worry about.
A visitor to Harvard asks a professor, "Excuse me, but would you
be good enough to tell me where the Harvard Library is at?"
"Sir," came the sneering reply, "at Harvard we do not end a
sentence with a preposition."
"Well, in that case, forgive me," said the visitor. "Permit me to
rephrase my question. Would you be good enough to tell me where
the Harvard Library is at, jackass?"
The same as it was the last time it was posted here.
But different from the way I heard it: it was on a NYC subway
platform asking where the train was at, and the last word was
"asshole."
It was princeton in a.q

It was the first day of a new term at Princeton, and a Texas A&M freshman
was learning his way around the campus. Stopping a distinguished looking
upperclassman, he inquired,
"Say, buddy, can you tell me where the library is at?"
"My good fellow," came the reply, "at Princeton we do not end our
sentences with a preposition."
"All right," said the freshman, "can you tell me where the library
is at, asshole?"
%
Post by Peter Moylan
Agreed. In the world of jokes, Harvard is the place where they wash
their hands after urinating.
That was cmu

%
As part of an experimental exchange program, three guys from MIT,
Princeton, and Carnegie Mellon :-) are sent to a school on the West
Coast. The first night there they decide to go out to dinner and get to
know each other. As soon as dinner is over, coincidentally, all three
get up from the table and go to the restroom.
The student from MIT finishes first, goes to the sink, and washes his
hands with a vengeance, making sure the soap touches every bit of his
skin. He does this twice.
The Princeton man is next and he washes his hands quickly, barely
touching the soap.
So these two stand around waiting for the Carnegie Mellon guy to wash
up, and are shocked to see him walk right past the sink without giving
it a look!
After a few minutes back at the table, the MIT student can't resist,
and says: "You know, at MIT they teach us to do things thoroughly."
Picking up on his lead, the guy from Princeton says: "And at Princeton
they teach us to do things quickly." Not to be outdone, the third
responds: "Well, at Carnegie Mellon they teach us not to piss on our
hands!"
%



... and on the original topic there was the North Woods farm girl at the
general store

%
"Do you keep stationery?" he asked.
"Well," she giggled, "I do until the last few seconds, and
then I just go wild."
%
charles
2019-11-03 10:20:04 UTC
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Post by Madhu
It was the first day of a new term at Princeton,
[Snip]

It was the start of a new year at Cambridge, England (c1900). The new
student is asked by his tutor if he is setting in. Well, sir, I don't seem
to be able to find a bathroom (that's the room with a bath in it in the UK).
"Bath, boy? You're only here for 2 months. If you feel the need, there's
always the river."

Things have changed
--
from KT24 in Surrey, England
"I'd rather die of exhaustion than die of boredom" Thomas Carlyle
David Kleinecke
2019-11-03 18:38:09 UTC
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Post by charles
Post by Madhu
It was the first day of a new term at Princeton,
[Snip]
It was the start of a new year at Cambridge, England (c1900). The
new student is asked by his tutor if he is setting in. Well, sir, I
don't seem to be able to find a bathroom (that's the room with a bath
in it in the UK). "Bath, boy? You're only here for 2 months. If you
feel the need, there's always the river."
Things have changed
They might change back. The idea that one should wash every day is a
very new one. In my part of the world, and I suspect in a few other
parts of the world, we have now reached the point where many towns have
to have drinking water trucked in at great expense, and of course there
are severe restrictions on using this water for non-drinking purposes.
Since this promises to be a long-term problem, we might again get back
to a position where having a bath or shower is considered anti-social,
perhaps even illegal.
you must remember that Queen Elizabeth I 'had a bath once a year, whether
she needed it or not'.
I used to use that joke to explain why I never washed my car.
Quinn C
2019-11-04 22:55:05 UTC
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Post by Madhu
"Well, at Carnegie Mellon they teach us not to piss on our
hands!"
That version never convinced me, because urine is not the reason for
washing your hands. Now if you piss hands-free, that's another matter.
I've seen one of my colleagues do that, arms akimbo (but I don't know
what he did at the end of the process.)
--
The bee must not pass judgment on the hive. (Voxish proverb)
-- Robert C. Wilson, Vortex (novel), p.125
Peter T. Daniels
2019-11-05 15:07:59 UTC
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Post by Quinn C
Post by Madhu
"Well, at Carnegie Mellon they teach us not to piss on our
hands!"
That version never convinced me, because urine is not the reason for
washing your hands.
Really? Lots of people consider it "dirty."
Post by Quinn C
Now if you piss hands-free, that's another matter.
I've seen one of my colleagues do that, arms akimbo (but I don't know
what he did at the end of the process.)
Maybe a shimmy?
Anders D. Nygaard
2019-11-05 16:05:17 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Quinn C
Post by Madhu
"Well, at Carnegie Mellon they teach us not to piss on our
hands!"
That version never convinced me, because urine is not the reason for
washing your hands.
Really? Lots of people consider it "dirty."
Urine is essentially sterile.

/Anders, Denmark.
Peter T. Daniels
2019-11-05 16:32:43 UTC
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Post by Anders D. Nygaard
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Quinn C
Post by Madhu
"Well, at Carnegie Mellon they teach us not to piss on our
hands!"
That version never convinced me, because urine is not the reason for
washing your hands.
Really? Lots of people consider it "dirty."
Urine is essentially sterile.
Nonetheless, lots of people consider it "dirty" and the reason for
hand-washing in that circumstance.
Tony Cooper
2019-11-05 20:07:07 UTC
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On Tue, 5 Nov 2019 08:32:43 -0800 (PST), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Anders D. Nygaard
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Quinn C
Post by Madhu
"Well, at Carnegie Mellon they teach us not to piss on our
hands!"
That version never convinced me, because urine is not the reason for
washing your hands.
Really? Lots of people consider it "dirty."
Urine is essentially sterile.
Nonetheless, lots of people consider it "dirty" and the reason for
hand-washing in that circumstance.
It is not the urine that is dirty, it's what the urine comes out of
that's "dirty" bacteria-wise. That which it comes out of is a
closed-in (clothed-in, too) bacteria breeding ground.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
RH Draney
2019-11-05 17:24:50 UTC
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Post by Anders D. Nygaard
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Quinn C
Post by Madhu
"Well, at Carnegie Mellon they teach us not to piss on our
hands!"
That version never convinced me, because urine is not the reason for
washing your hands.
Really? Lots of people consider it "dirty."
Urine is essentially sterile.
Don't make me sing at you!



....r
Peter Young
2019-11-05 18:18:54 UTC
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Post by Anders D. Nygaard
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Quinn C
Post by Madhu
"Well, at Carnegie Mellon they teach us not to piss on our
hands!"
That version never convinced me, because urine is not the reason for
washing your hands.
Really? Lots of people consider it "dirty."
Urine is essentially sterile.
Unless it's infected, clearly.

Peter.
--
Peter Young, (BrE, RP), Consultant Anaesthetist, 1975-2004.
(US equivalent: Certified Anesthesiologist) (AUE Hg)
Cheltenham and Gloucester, UK. Now happily retired.
http://pnyoung.orpheusweb.co.uk
Quinn C
2019-11-05 17:35:56 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Quinn C
Post by Madhu
"Well, at Carnegie Mellon they teach us not to piss on our
hands!"
That version never convinced me, because urine is not the reason for
washing your hands.
Really? Lots of people consider it "dirty."
OK, better: ... is not the reason why you *should* wash your hands.

The story seems like a holdover from before we knew about those little
buggers called bacteria. Thinking urine is the only or even the most
dirty thing about the process isn't based in science, so not an
endorsement for an academic.
--
Java is kind of like kindergarten. There are lots of rules you
have to remember. If you don't follow them, the compiler makes
you sit in the corner until you do.
Don Raab
CDB
2019-11-03 11:15:09 UTC
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Post by Ken Blake
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Peter Young
. "Stationary cashpoint" for the candy checkout? Can
"stationary" mean "candies"/"confectionery"?
Not in English. Did they mean "stationery? Unlikely.
The spelling "stationary" was my mistake when typing the post. I
tried to fix it using a Supersedes post. Sorry!
However, I take it from you post that "stationery cashpoint" is
not a possible designation for the checkout at which the sweets
are to be paid for.
OT: I see that I ended the above sentence with a preposition.
What do you think is wrong with that? There were worse things in
your post to worry about.
A visitor to Harvard asks a professor, "Excuse me, but would you
be good enough to tell me where the Harvard Library is at?"
"Sir," came the sneering reply, "at Harvard we do not end a
sentence with a preposition."
"Well, in that case, forgive me," said the visitor. "Permit me to
rephrase my question. Would you be good enough to tell me where
the Harvard Library is at, jackass?"
The same as it was the last time it was posted here.
But different from the way I heard it: it was on a NYC subway
platform asking where the train was at, and the last word was
"asshole."
The version I heard featured two Southern women, a rural accent (maybe
AAVE) for the question, and a very superior accent for the reproof.

"Ah'm from a paht of the country, wheah we do not end ouah sentences,
with prepositions?"

"Oh. Oh. Uh, wheh' y'all from, bitch?"
--
Some punctuation used for rhetorical effect
Ken Blake
2019-11-03 17:06:07 UTC
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Post by CDB
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Peter Young
. "Stationary cashpoint" for the candy checkout? Can
"stationary" mean "candies"/"confectionery"?
Not in English. Did they mean "stationery? Unlikely.
The spelling "stationary" was my mistake when typing the post. I
tried to fix it using a Supersedes post. Sorry!
However, I take it from you post that "stationery cashpoint" is
not a possible designation for the checkout at which the sweets
are to be paid for.
OT: I see that I ended the above sentence with a preposition.
What do you think is wrong with that? There were worse things in
your post to worry about.
A visitor to Harvard asks a professor, "Excuse me, but would you
be good enough to tell me where the Harvard Library is at?"
"Sir," came the sneering reply, "at Harvard we do not end a
sentence with a preposition."
"Well, in that case, forgive me," said the visitor. "Permit me to
rephrase my question. Would you be good enough to tell me where
the Harvard Library is at, jackass?"
The same as it was the last time it was posted here.
But different from the way I heard it: it was on a NYC subway
platform asking where the train was at, and the last word was
"asshole."
The version I heard featured two Southern women, a rural accent (maybe
AAVE) for the question, and a very superior accent for the reproof.
"Ah'm from a paht of the country, wheah we do not end ouah sentences,
with prepositions?"
"Oh. Oh. Uh, wheh' y'all from, bitch?"
Like many jokes, it comes with regional variations.
--
Ken
Peter T. Daniels
2019-11-02 23:12:44 UTC
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Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Peter Young
Post by Stefan Ram
. "Stationary cashpoint" for the candy checkout?
Can "stationary" mean "candies"/"confectionery"?
Not in English. Did they mean "stationery? Unlikely.
The spelling "stationary" was my mistake when typing the
post. I tried to fix it using a Supersedes post. Sorry!
However, I take it from you post that "stationery cashpoint"
is not a possible designation for the checkout at which the
sweets are to be paid for.
Why couldn't they have one kiosk at which both candy and stationery
are sold?

Where, however, did you get "stationary" or "stationery" from?
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
OT: I see that I ended the above sentence with a preposition.
What do you think is wrong with that? There were worse things in your
post to worry about.
A visitor to Harvard asks a professor, "Excuse me, but would
you be good enough to tell me where the Harvard Library is at?"
"Sir," came the sneering reply, "at Harvard we do not end a
sentence with a preposition."
"Well, in that case, forgive me," said the visitor. "Permit me
to rephrase my question. Would you be good enough to tell me
where the Harvard Library is at, jackass?"
The same as it was the last time it was posted here.
That doesn't seem like something Charles Osgood of CBS Radio (and later,
CBS Sunday Morning) would say. It might conceivably have been Garrison
Keillor, but he would have ended the sentence with a different vocative.
Mark Brader
2019-11-03 04:06:40 UTC
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Post by Stefan Ram
What's written on a sign in a department store
|Bitte bezahlen Sie unsere Süßwarenartikel nur an der
|Süßwarenkasse.
|Please pay our sweets only at the candy checkout.
Pay *for* our candies. (Or sweets, if you're British, but there's
no reason to use a different word the second time.)
Post by Stefan Ram
|Confectionary has to be paid at our stationary cashpoint.
. "Stationary cashpoint" for the candy checkout?
It's an error, probably the result of somehow confusing "stationery"
with "confectionery". "Paid" without "for" is also an error here.
Post by Stefan Ram
Can "stationary" mean "candies"/"confectionery"?
No, and "confectionary", with an A, does not exist. As you have it,
it's "confectionery", with an E.
--
Mark Brader "Do YOU trust US?"
Toronto "YES!! Well, we try to."
***@vex.net -- A Walk in the Woods, by Lee Blessing
Quinn C
2019-11-04 19:59:23 UTC
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Post by Mark Brader
Post by Stefan Ram
Can "stationary" mean "candies"/"confectionery"?
No, and "confectionary", with an A, does not exist. As you have it,
it's "confectionery", with an E.
I wondered about that, too, but the dictionaries say it does.

| 5. (uncountable, rare) Candy, sweets, taken collectively; confectionery.
<https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/confectionary>

Still, "confectionery" would be better, not being rare and
semi-obsolete.
--
The need of a personal pronoun of the singular number and common
gender is so desperate, urgent, imperative, that ... it should long
since have grown on our speech -- The Atlantic Monthly (1878)
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