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Peter T. Daniels
2021-04-03 14:50:29 UTC
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Which of these two sentences says that the description _does_ apply?

"There is no question that the clicks are among the most ear-catching
of all sound-elements found around the world."

"There is no question but that the clicks are among the most ear-catching
of all sound-elements found around the world."
Jerry Friedman
2021-04-03 15:16:03 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Which of these two sentences says that the description _does_ apply?
"There is no question that the clicks are among the most ear-catching
of all sound-elements found around the world."
"There is no question but that the clicks are among the most ear-catching
of all sound-elements found around the world."
Both, and without any doubt there are unquestionably better ways to say it.
And what are the other most ear-catching sounds, and does ear-catchingness
depend on foreignness to the listener?
--
Jerry Friedman
Peter T. Daniels
2021-04-03 17:45:27 UTC
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Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Which of these two sentences says that the description _does_ apply?
"There is no question that the clicks are among the most ear-catching
of all sound-elements found around the world."
"There is no question but that the clicks are among the most ear-catching
of all sound-elements found around the world."
Both, and without any doubt there are unquestionably better ways to say it.
Without any doubt! Good idea!
Post by Jerry Friedman
And what are the other most ear-catching sounds, and does ear-catchingness
depend on foreignness to the listener?
Well, Maddieson says there are some consonants with whistled co-articulation
that doesn't relate to ill-fitting dentures. And up north, in Niger-Congo there
seem to be some labio-dental flaps.

In this case I'd say prominence in the speech stream -- when you listen
to Miriam Makeba, don't they just pop out at you?

This is for the introductory chapter in a book on Literacy in Africa, subsection
introducing the languages, so the audience is psychologists and educationists,
and it's a bit shocking how little exposure they've had to any linguistics at all.
So, no technical terminology! (Zulu and Xhosa don't come in until the next
subsubsection, and they use Roman letters for the clicks.) The one "Khoisan"
language I know to have a standard written form, Nama (cf. "Namibia"), uses
the IPA letters in its orthography, ǀ ǁ ǂ ǃ .
Jerry Friedman
2021-04-03 18:22:05 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Which of these two sentences says that the description _does_ apply?
"There is no question that the clicks are among the most ear-catching
of all sound-elements found around the world."
"There is no question but that the clicks are among the most ear-catching
of all sound-elements found around the world."
Both, and without any doubt there are unquestionably better ways to say it.
Without any doubt! Good idea!
I was hoping one of my suggestions would be useful to you.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Jerry Friedman
And what are the other most ear-catching sounds, and does ear-catchingness
depend on foreignness to the listener?
Well, Maddieson says there are some consonants with whistled co-articulation
that doesn't relate to ill-fitting dentures. And up north, in Niger-Congo there
seem to be some labio-dental flaps.
OK, the whistled ones would probably catch my ear.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
In this case I'd say prominence in the speech stream -- when you listen
to Miriam Makeba, don't they just pop out at you?
...

Sure, and I imagine they would at 99+% of people hearing her, but that may be
just because we're unfamiliar with them. Maybe they're not ear-catching to
southern Africans who grew up with them. Just a point for you to consider
addressing or not.
--
Jerry Friedman
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