Discussion:
the more pertinent image
(too old to reply)
Lazypierrot
2019-11-04 05:24:08 UTC
Permalink
I would like to know why "the" is used, not "a", in the phrase "the more pertinent image" in the first sentence of the second paragraph below. I wonder if there is something implied by using the definite article.

----------------------------------------
The idea that the humble chicken could become a savior of wildlife will seem
improbable to many environmentalists. We tend to equate poultry* production with
factory farms, downstream pollution and 50-piece McNugget buckets.
In much of the developing world, though, “a chicken in every pot” is "the more
pertinent image". It’s a tantalizing one for some conservationists because what’s
in the pot there these days is mostly trapped, snared or hunted wildlife ― also
called bushmeat ― from cane rats and brush-tailed porcupines to gorillas.



Cordially,

LP
Mark Brader
2019-11-04 06:00:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lazypierrot
I would like to know why "the" is used, not "a", in the phrase "the more
pertinent image" in the first sentence of the second paragraph below. I
wonder if there is something implied by using the definite article.
----------------------------------------
The idea that the humble chicken could become a savior of wildlife will
seem improbable to many environmentalists. We tend to equate poultry
production with
factory farms, downstream pollution and 50-piece McNugget buckets.
In much of the developing world, though, "a chicken in every pot"
is "the more pertinent image"...
It's *the* more pertinent of two images that have been identified:
(1) the one we tend to have in mind, and (2) the correcly relevant one.

Another expression of this kind is "I dialed the wrong number".
It's "the" wrong number of two -- the one you meant to dial and
the one you actually dialed. Similarly, "You have the wrong idea
about me." There are many possible wrong ideas, but only the
one that you have is relevant.
--
Mark Brader "He'll spend at least part of his life
Toronto in prison, or parliament, or both."
***@vex.net --Peter Moylan

My text in this article is in the public domain.
Jack
2019-11-04 06:06:57 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 3 Nov 2019 21:24:08 -0800 (PST), Lazypierrot
Post by Lazypierrot
I would like to know why "the" is used, not "a", in the phrase "the more pertinent image" in the first sentence of the second paragraph below. I wonder if there is something implied by using the definite article.
----------------------------------------
The idea that the humble chicken could become a savior of wildlife will seem
improbable to many environmentalists. We tend to equate poultry* production with
factory farms, downstream pollution and 50-piece McNugget buckets.
In much of the developing world, though, “a chicken in every pot” is "the more
pertinent image". It’s a tantalizing one for some conservationists because what’s
in the pot there these days is mostly trapped, snared or hunted wildlife ? also
called bushmeat ? from cane rats and brush-tailed porcupines to gorillas.
I don't think there's any difference between 'a' and 'the' in that
use.

May I suggest that you use some character other than a quotation mark
to mark your passage of interest? If you use an _underscore_ or
*asteriisk*, i
Lazypierrot
2019-11-04 07:54:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jack
May I suggest that you use some character other than a quotation mark
to mark your passage of interest? If you use an _underscore_ or
*asteriisk*, it won't be as confusing.
--
John
Thanks for your kind suggestion. But some other person told me not to use *asterisk* because it also causes cofusion.
I'd better use _underscore_ from now on.


Cordially,

LP
Peter T. Daniels
2019-11-04 12:57:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lazypierrot
Post by Jack
May I suggest that you use some character other than a quotation mark
to mark your passage of interest? If you use an _underscore_ or
*asteriisk*, it won't be as confusing.
--
John
Thanks for your kind suggestion. But some other person told me not to use *asterisk* because it also causes cofusion.
I'd better use _underscore_ from now on.
Please DON'T. Any such marks interfere with the interpretation of the
passage. You always clearly indicate what you are asking about.
CDB
2019-11-04 14:33:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lazypierrot
Post by Jack
May I suggest that you use some character other than a quotation
mark to mark your passage of interest? If you use an _underscore_
or *asteriisk*, it won't be as confusing.
Thanks for your kind suggestion. But some other person told me not
to use *asterisk* because it also causes cofusion. I'd better use
_underscore_ from now on.
Underscore would be fine; the asterisks were fine too. I agree with
John about the use of quotation marks -- I spend a second wondering if I
have missed the text being quoted, before I remember.

I wouldn't have complained about the asterisks, myself. These are your
posts, and you are under no obligation to submit to the arbitrary
bullying of some other person.
Peter T. Daniels
2019-11-04 15:36:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by CDB
Post by Lazypierrot
Post by Jack
May I suggest that you use some character other than a quotation
mark to mark your passage of interest? If you use an _underscore_
or *asteriisk*, it won't be as confusing.
Thanks for your kind suggestion. But some other person told me not
to use *asterisk* because it also causes cofusion. I'd better use
_underscore_ from now on.
Underscore would be fine; the asterisks were fine too. I agree with
John about the use of quotation marks -- I spend a second wondering if I
have missed the text being quoted, before I remember.
I wouldn't have complained about the asterisks, myself. These are your
posts, and you are under no obligation to submit to the arbitrary
bullying of some other person.
You never found the erroneous emphasis distracting? It's unCanadian of
you to bully.
CDB
2019-11-04 20:34:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by CDB
Post by Lazypierrot
Post by Jack
May I suggest that you use some character other than a quotation
mark to mark your passage of interest? If you use an _underscore_
or *asteriisk*, it won't be as confusing.
Thanks for your kind suggestion. But some other person told me not
to use *asterisk* because it also causes cofusion. I'd better use
_underscore_ from now on.
Underscore would be fine; the asterisks were fine too. I agree with
John about the use of quotation marks -- I spend a second wondering if I
have missed the text being quoted, before I remember.
I wouldn't have complained about the asterisks, myself. These are your
posts, and you are under no obligation to submit to the arbitrary
bullying of some other person.
You never found the erroneous emphasis distracting? It's unCanadian of
you to bully.
You must be thinking of some other other person.

Peter T. Daniels
2019-11-04 12:56:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jack
On Sun, 3 Nov 2019 21:24:08 -0800 (PST), Lazypierrot
Post by Lazypierrot
I would like to know why "the" is used, not "a", in the phrase "the more pertinent image" in the first sentence of the second paragraph below. I wonder if there is something implied by using the definite article.
----------------------------------------
The idea that the humble chicken could become a savior of wildlife will seem
improbable to many environmentalists. We tend to equate poultry* production with
factory farms, downstream pollution and 50-piece McNugget buckets.
In much of the developing world, though, “a chicken in every pot” is "the more
pertinent image". It’s a tantalizing one for some conservationists because what’s
in the pot there these days is mostly trapped, snared or hunted wildlife ? also
called bushmeat ? from cane rats and brush-tailed porcupines to gorillas.
I don't think there's any difference between 'a' and 'the' in that
use.
May I suggest that you use some character other than a quotation mark
to mark your passage of interest? If you use an _underscore_ or
*asteriisk*, it won't be as confusing.
After all these years, I JUST got her to stop marking the word of interest
with asterisks -- it can only be read as emphasis and throws off interpre-
tation of the passage.
Jack
2019-11-04 14:35:53 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 4 Nov 2019 04:56:32 -0800 (PST), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Jack
On Sun, 3 Nov 2019 21:24:08 -0800 (PST), Lazypierrot
Post by Lazypierrot
I would like to know why "the" is used, not "a", in the phrase "the more pertinent image" in the first sentence of the second paragraph below. I wonder if there is something implied by using the definite article.
----------------------------------------
The idea that the humble chicken could become a savior of wildlife will seem
improbable to many environmentalists. We tend to equate poultry* production with
factory farms, downstream pollution and 50-piece McNugget buckets.
In much of the developing world, though, “a chicken in every pot” is "the more
pertinent image". It’s a tantalizing one for some conservationists because what’s
in the pot there these days is mostly trapped, snared or hunted wildlife ? also
called bushmeat ? from cane rats and brush-tailed porcupines to gorillas.
I don't think there's any difference between 'a' and 'the' in that
use.
May I suggest that you use some character other than a quotation mark
to mark your passage of interest? If you use an _underscore_ or
*asteriisk*, it won't be as confusing.
After all these years, I JUST got her to stop marking the word of interest
with asterisks -- it can only be read as emphasis and throws off interpre-
tation of the passage.
Not as much as quotes, whic
Loading...