Discussion:
Word of the Day
(too old to reply)
Internetado
2018-05-11 17:20:30 UTC
Permalink
Feynman diagram:
(physics) A pictorial representation of the interactions of subatomic
particles, showing their paths in space and time as lines, and their
interactions as points where lines meet.
<https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Feynman_diagram>
--
--

Internetado
www.alt119.net - Alternate NewsServer
Peter Young
2018-05-11 20:49:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by Internetado
(physics) A pictorial representation of the interactions of subatomic
particles, showing their paths in space and time as lines, and their
interactions as points where lines meet.
<https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Feynman_diagram>
That looks like two words to me.

Peter.
--
Peter Young, (BrE, RP), Consultant Anaesthetist, 1975-2004.
(US equivalent: Certified Anesthesiologist) (AUE Pt)
Cheltenham and Gloucester, UK. Now happily retired.
http://pnyoung.orpheusweb.co.uk
Whiskers
1970-01-01 00:00:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Young
Post by Internetado
(physics) A pictorial representation of the interactions of subatomic
particles, showing their paths in space and time as lines, and their
interactions as points where lines meet.
<https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Feynman_diagram>
That looks like two words to me.
Peter.
Yabbut they intersect.
--
^^^^^^^^^^
Whiskers
~~~~~~~~~~


----Android NewsGroup Reader----
http://usenet.sinaapp.com/
occam
2018-05-13 06:56:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by Whiskers
Post by Peter Young
Post by Internetado
(physics) A pictorial representation of the interactions of subatomic
particles, showing their paths in space and time as lines, and their
interactions as points where lines meet.
<https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Feynman_diagram>
That looks like two words to me.
Peter.
Yabbut they intersect.
At which point? Can you draw me a Feynman diagram?
Whiskers
1970-01-01 00:00:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by occam
Post by Whiskers
Post by Peter Young
Post by Internetado
(physics) A pictorial representation of the interactions of subatomic
particles, showing their paths in space and time as lines, and their
interactions as points where lines meet.
<https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Feynman_diagram>
That looks like two words to me.
Peter.
Yabbut they intersect.
At which point? Can you draw me a Feynman diagram?
It's done using visual imagination. There's a Feynman, holding a
pencil or a piece of chalk or a crayon or pen, and a surface upon
which the Feynman draws a diagram. Or there's just a Feynman who
waves his hands about and talks. Or there's a substitute
Feynman. Or there's a written description of the
foregoing.

There are also potential meta-Feynman diagrams, such as the lines
joining all the books in a libraray which discuss Feynman
diagrams. These can be sub-divided into 'static' and 'dynamic'
varieties depending on how they react when the books are moved.
Interactions take place in the vicinity of students and
researchers and librarians.

Then there are the paths of all the electrons and energy particles
involved in the transmission storage and distribution of
discussions such as this. These currently exist as a network (or
rather, a web) somewhat larger than this planet.
--
^^^^^^^^^^
Whiskers
~~~~~~~~~~


----Android NewsGroup Reader----
http://usenet.sinaapp.com/
J. J. Lodder
2018-05-13 15:33:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by Whiskers
Post by occam
Post by Whiskers
Post by Peter Young
Post by Internetado
(physics) A pictorial representation of the interactions of subatomic
particles, showing their paths in space and time as lines, and their
interactions as points where lines meet.
<https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Feynman_diagram>
That looks like two words to me.
Peter.
Yabbut they intersect.
At which point? Can you draw me a Feynman diagram?
It's done using visual imagination. There's a Feynman, holding a
pencil or a piece of chalk or a crayon or pen, and a surface upon
which the Feynman draws a diagram. Or there's just a Feynman who
waves his hands about and talks. Or there's a substitute
Feynman. Or there's a written description of the
None of the above. It's all about equations.
Feynman diagrams are no more than a convenient way
of keeping track of all the terms.

What is done next is actually writing those terms out,
and evaluating the corresponding integrals.
(using among other things the so-called Feynman tricks)
Actually a lot of hard work,
and a great many sheets of paper
covered with computations.

The real Feynman was quite contemptuous
about people who just wave their hands and talk,

Jan
Anders D. Nygaard
2018-05-18 21:31:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by Whiskers
Post by occam
Post by Whiskers
Post by Peter Young
Post by Internetado
(physics) A pictorial representation of the interactions of subatomic
particles, showing their paths in space and time as lines, and their
interactions as points where lines meet.
<https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Feynman_diagram>
That looks like two words to me.
Peter.
Yabbut they intersect.
At which point? Can you draw me a Feynman diagram?
It's done using visual imagination. There's a Feynman, holding a
pencil or a piece of chalk or a crayon or pen, and a surface upon
which the Feynman draws a diagram. Or there's just a Feynman who
waves his hands about and talks. Or there's a substitute
Feynman. Or there's a written description of the
None of the above. It's all about equations.
Feynman diagrams are no more than a convenient way
of keeping track of all the terms.
What is done next is actually writing those terms out,
and evaluating the corresponding integrals.
(using among other things the so-called Feynman tricks)
Actually a lot of hard work,
and a great many sheets of paper
covered with computations.
The real Feynman was quite contemptuous
about people who just wave their hands and talk,
He would probably want them also to particle their hands.

/Anders, Denmark.

Athel Cornish-Bowden
2018-05-12 08:03:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Young
Post by Internetado
(physics) A pictorial representation of the interactions of subatomic
particles, showing their paths in space and time as lines, and their
interactions as points where lines meet.
<https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Feynman_diagram>
That looks like two words to me.
To me too, but when Time, for example, announces its Word of the Year,
there are often, it seems to me, more than of word.

In this case I was more concerned with "of the day". Feynman diagrams
have been around for decades, and even if Internetado has only come
across them today that doesn't make them words of the day. Words of his
day, perhaps.
Post by Peter Young
--
athel
Madrigal Gurneyhalt
2018-05-12 10:49:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Peter Young
Post by Internetado
(physics) A pictorial representation of the interactions of subatomic
particles, showing their paths in space and time as lines, and their
interactions as points where lines meet.
<https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Feynman_diagram>
That looks like two words to me.
To me too, but when Time, for example, announces its Word of the Year,
there are often, it seems to me, more than of word.
In this case I was more concerned with "of the day". Feynman diagrams
have been around for decades, and even if Internetado has only come
across them today that doesn't make them words of the day. Words of his
day, perhaps.
Hypercritical or what? It simply means it's the word that the site is
featuring that day. Would you also complain if the Dish of the Day
at a restaurant was something for which the recipe had been around
for 50 years?
CDB
2018-05-12 13:16:51 UTC
Permalink
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Peter Young
Feynman diagram: (physics) A pictorial representation of the
interactions of subatomic particles, showing their paths in
space and time as lines, and their interactions as points where
lines meet. <https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Feynman_diagram>
That looks like two words to me.
To me too, but when Time, for example, announces its Word of the
Year, there are often, it seems to me, more than of word.
In this case I was more concerned with "of the day". Feynman
diagrams have been around for decades, and even if Internetado has
only come across them today that doesn't make them words of the
day. Words of his day, perhaps.
I wonder if the last part of his nym is the French "ado".
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Hypercritical or what? It simply means it's the word that the site
is featuring that day. Would you also complain if the Dish of the
Day at a restaurant was something for which the recipe had been
around for 50 years?
Which site is that?
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2018-05-12 13:38:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by CDB
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Peter Young
Feynman diagram: (physics) A pictorial representation of the
interactions of subatomic particles, showing their paths in
space and time as lines, and their interactions as points where
lines meet. <https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Feynman_diagram>
That looks like two words to me.
To me too, but when Time, for example, announces its Word of the
Year, there are often, it seems to me, more than of word.
In this case I was more concerned with "of the day". Feynman
diagrams have been around for decades, and even if Internetado has
only come across them today that doesn't make them words of the
day. Words of his day, perhaps.
I wonder if the last part of his nym is the French "ado".
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Hypercritical or what? It simply means it's the word that the site
is featuring that day. Would you also complain if the Dish of the
Day at a restaurant was something for which the recipe had been
around for 50 years?
Which site is that?
Initially I thought Madrigal might have a point, but then I looked at
various sites discussing "the word of the year", such as

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2017/dec/18/word-of-the-year-2017-oxford-dictionaries-youthquake


https://tinyurl.com/y85xtxxt
Post by CDB
“Selecting one word each year that embodies the previous 12 months is a
difficult task, which is one reason we surround it with a diverse
shortlist of friends.”
There is no way the "word of the year" (a silly idea anyway, but one
that appeals to journalists) would be a word that has been well known
for 50 years.
--
athel
Madrigal Gurneyhalt
2018-05-12 23:22:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by CDB
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Peter Young
Feynman diagram: (physics) A pictorial representation of the
interactions of subatomic particles, showing their paths in
space and time as lines, and their interactions as points where
lines meet. <https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Feynman_diagram>
That looks like two words to me.
To me too, but when Time, for example, announces its Word of the
Year, there are often, it seems to me, more than of word.
In this case I was more concerned with "of the day". Feynman
diagrams have been around for decades, and even if Internetado has
only come across them today that doesn't make them words of the
day. Words of his day, perhaps.
I wonder if the last part of his nym is the French "ado".
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Hypercritical or what? It simply means it's the word that the site
is featuring that day. Would you also complain if the Dish of the
Day at a restaurant was something for which the recipe had been
around for 50 years?
Which site is that?
Initially I thought Madrigal might have a point, but then I looked at
various sites discussing "the word of the year", such as
https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2017/dec/18/word-of-the-year-2017-oxford-dictionaries-youthquake
https://tinyurl.com/y85xtxxt
Post by CDB
“Selecting one word each year that embodies the previous 12 months is a
difficult task, which is one reason we surround it with a diverse
shortlist of friends.”
There is no way the "word of the year" (a silly idea anyway, but one
that appeals to journalists) would be a word that has been well known
for 50 years.
I hesitate to point out the obvious difference between day and year!
Might I suggest revision of the roots of 'ephemeral'?
CDB
2018-05-13 11:58:50 UTC
Permalink
[Richard Feynman and the Word of the Day]
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by CDB
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Hypercritical or what? It simply means it's the word that the
site is featuring that day. Would you also complain if the Dish
of the Day at a restaurant was something for which the recipe
had been around for 50 years?
Which site is that?
Initially I thought Madrigal might have a point, but then I looked
at various sites discussing "the word of the year", such as
https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2017/dec/18/word-of-the-year-2017-oxford-dictionaries-youthquake
https://tinyurl.com/y85xtxxt
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by CDB
“Selecting one word each year that embodies the previous 12
months is a difficult task, which is one reason we surround it
with a diverse shortlist of friends.”
There is no way the "word of the year" (a silly idea anyway, but
one that appeals to journalists) would be a word that has been well
known for 50 years.
I hesitate to point out the obvious difference between day and year!
Might I suggest revision of the roots of 'ephemeral'?
Eheu fugaces labuntur omnes.
Snidely
2018-05-15 08:28:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by CDB
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Peter Young
Feynman diagram: (physics) A pictorial representation of the
interactions of subatomic particles, showing their paths in
space and time as lines, and their interactions as points where
lines meet. <https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Feynman_diagram>
That looks like two words to me.
To me too, but when Time, for example, announces its Word of the
Year, there are often, it seems to me, more than of word.
In this case I was more concerned with "of the day". Feynman
diagrams have been around for decades, and even if Internetado has
only come across them today that doesn't make them words of the
day. Words of his day, perhaps.
I wonder if the last part of his nym is the French "ado".
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Hypercritical or what? It simply means it's the word that the site
is featuring that day. Would you also complain if the Dish of the
Day at a restaurant was something for which the recipe had been
around for 50 years?
Which site is that?
Initially I thought Madrigal might have a point, but then I looked at various
sites discussing "the word of the year", such as
https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2017/dec/18/word-of-the-year-2017-oxford-dictionaries-youthquake
https://tinyurl.com/y85xtxxt
Post by CDB
“Selecting one word each year that embodies the previous 12 months is a
difficult task, which is one reason we surround it with a diverse shortlist
of friends.”
There is no way the "word of the year" (a silly idea anyway, but one that
appeals to journalists) would be a word that has been well known for 50
years.
Why so? We've seen discussion of the OED and M-W word-of-the-year
entries, and I'm pretty sure that on occasion each of them has picked a
familiar word that has had a sudden increase in activity. The
increase of activity is the key, not the age.

/dps
--
Maybe C282Y is simply one of the hangers-on, a groupie following a
future guitar god of the human genome: an allele with undiscovered
virtuosity, currently soloing in obscurity in Mom's garage.
Bradley Wertheim, theAtlantic.com, Jan 10 2013
J. J. Lodder
2018-05-12 11:10:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Peter Young
Post by Internetado
(physics) A pictorial representation of the interactions of subatomic
particles, showing their paths in space and time as lines, and their
interactions as points where lines meet.
<https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Feynman_diagram>
That looks like two words to me.
To me too, but when Time, for example, announces its Word of the Year,
there are often, it seems to me, more than of word.
In this case I was more concerned with "of the day". Feynman diagrams
have been around for decades, and even if Internetado has only come
across them today that doesn't make them words of the day. Words of his
day, perhaps.
Feynman 1948, so 70 years ago this year.
Don't know if there is a date of creation,
but the publication date was 1 April 1948,

Jan
Quinn C
2018-05-15 17:28:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Young
Post by Internetado
(physics) A pictorial representation of the interactions of subatomic
particles, showing their paths in space and time as lines, and their
interactions as points where lines meet.
<https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Feynman_diagram>
That looks like two words to me.
May I have a word with you?
--
Democracy means government by the uneducated,
while aristocracy means government by the badly educated.
-- G. K. Chesterton
s***@gmail.com
2018-05-17 21:16:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Young
Post by Internetado
(physics) A pictorial representation of the interactions of subatomic
particles, showing their paths in space and time as lines, and their
interactions as points where lines meet.
<https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Feynman_diagram>
That looks like two words to me.
Peter.
Meanwhile, Merriam-Webster suggests "otiose".

<quote>
Otiose was first used in English in the late-18th century
to describe things producing no useful result.
By mid-19th century, it was being used in keeping
with its Latin source otiosus, meaning "at leisure."
There is also the noun form otiosity, which predates otiose
by approximately three centuries.
That noun is rarely found in writing today,
but it makes an appearance on the occasional spelling bee word list.
</quote>
<URL:https://www.merriam-webster.com/word-of-the-day/otiose-2018-05-11>

with an example usage that seems rather wet.

/dps "previously, it was 'slumgullion'"
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