Discussion:
I was sure "communicade" was a word (is it not?)
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MWBradburne
2016-02-02 05:01:10 UTC
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I keep typing "communicade" in my missives, but the telltale red squiggle
chastises me for seemingly inadvertently making up the (Am) English word.

I was *sure* I had seen the word used so many times that it comes naturally
to the tips of my fingers as I type.

A quick google for "is communicade a word or not?", nets zilch.
https://duckduckgo.com/html?q=is+communicade+a+word+or+not%3F

Given that discrepancy between what *I* seem to inherently have stored in
my mental memory against the lack of any decent search hits, I must ask
you, the esteemed Gentlemen of English, whether it's *your* experience
that "communicade" is used as a term for "communication by text".

Have you seen "communicade" used as an (Am) English word?
Horace LaBadie
2016-02-02 05:20:32 UTC
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Permalink
Post by MWBradburne
I keep typing "communicade" in my missives, but the telltale red squiggle
chastises me for seemingly inadvertently making up the (Am) English word.
I was *sure* I had seen the word used so many times that it comes naturally
to the tips of my fingers as I type.
A quick google for "is communicade a word or not?", nets zilch.
https://duckduckgo.com/html?q=is+communicade+a+word+or+not%3F
Given that discrepancy between what *I* seem to inherently have stored in
my mental memory against the lack of any decent search hits, I must ask
you, the esteemed Gentlemen of English, whether it's *your* experience
that "communicade" is used as a term for "communication by text".
Have you seen "communicade" used as an (Am) English word?
communique, communicate but no communicade.
JD
2016-02-02 08:52:38 UTC
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Permalink
Post by MWBradburne
I keep typing "communicade" in my missives, but the telltale red squiggle
chastises me for seemingly inadvertently making up the (Am) English word.
I was *sure* I had seen the word used so many times that it comes naturally
to the tips of my fingers as I type.
A quick google for "is communicade a word or not?", nets zilch.
https://duckduckgo.com/html?q=is+communicade+a+word+or+not%3F
Given that discrepancy between what *I* seem to inherently have stored in
my mental memory against the lack of any decent search hits, I must ask
you, the esteemed Gentlemen of English, whether it's *your* experience
that "communicade" is used as a term for "communication by text".
Have you seen "communicade" used as an (Am) English word?
Incommunicado?
Whiskers
2016-02-02 14:08:33 UTC
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Permalink
Post by JD
Post by MWBradburne
I keep typing "communicade" in my missives, but the telltale red
squiggle chastises me for seemingly inadvertently making up the (Am)
English word.
I was *sure* I had seen the word used so many times that it comes
naturally to the tips of my fingers as I type.
A quick google for "is communicade a word or not?", nets zilch.
https://duckduckgo.com/html?q=is+communicade+a+word+or+not%3F
Given that discrepancy between what *I* seem to inherently have
stored in my mental memory against the lack of any decent search
hits, I must ask you, the esteemed Gentlemen of English, whether it's
*your* experience that "communicade" is used as a term for
"communication by text".
Have you seen "communicade" used as an (Am) English word?
Incommunicado?
Portmanteau of 'communicate' and 'parade'? I have heard 'communicate'
spoken with a d where the t should be - but more often with a glottal
stop or something similar.
--
-- ^^^^^^^^^^
-- Whiskers
-- ~~~~~~~~~~
Peter T. Daniels
2016-02-02 13:57:12 UTC
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Permalink
Post by MWBradburne
I keep typing "communicade" in my missives, but the telltale red squiggle
chastises me for seemingly inadvertently making up the (Am) English word.
I was *sure* I had seen the word used so many times that it comes naturally
to the tips of my fingers as I type.
A quick google for "is communicade a word or not?", nets zilch.
https://duckduckgo.com/html?q=is+communicade+a+word+or+not%3F
Given that discrepancy between what *I* seem to inherently have stored in
my mental memory against the lack of any decent search hits, I must ask
you, the esteemed Gentlemen of English, whether it's *your* experience
that "communicade" is used as a term for "communication by text".
Have you seen "communicade" used as an (Am) English word?
No.

I suppose it might be a clever invention in a humorist's essay, suggesting
a barrage of communications (as in "fusillade") or a barrier (as in
"stockade," "barricade").
Jerry Friedman
2016-02-02 15:48:11 UTC
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Permalink
Post by MWBradburne
I keep typing "communicade" in my missives, but the telltale red squiggle
chastises me for seemingly inadvertently making up the (Am) English word.
I was *sure* I had seen the word used so many times that it comes naturally
to the tips of my fingers as I type.
A quick google for "is communicade a word or not?", nets zilch.
https://duckduckgo.com/html?q=is+communicade+a+word+or+not%3F
Given that discrepancy between what *I* seem to inherently have stored in
my mental memory against the lack of any decent search hits, I must ask
you, the esteemed Gentlemen of English,
I suspect you're not going to get an answer from Helen or Janet or Joy or...
Post by MWBradburne
whether it's *your* experience
that "communicade" is used as a term for "communication by text".
Have you seen "communicade" used as an (Am) English word?
Nope, and it's not in the Oxford English Dictionary.
--
Jerry Friedman
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2016-02-02 15:52:14 UTC
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Permalink
Post by MWBradburne
I keep typing "communicade" in my missives, but the telltale red squiggle
chastises me for seemingly inadvertently making up the (Am) English word.
I was *sure* I had seen the word used so many times that it comes naturally
to the tips of my fingers as I type.
A quick google for "is communicade a word or not?", nets zilch.
https://duckduckgo.com/html?q=is+communicade+a+word+or+not%3F
Given that discrepancy between what *I* seem to inherently have stored in
my mental memory against the lack of any decent search hits, I must ask
you, the esteemed Gentlemen of English, whether it's *your* experience
that "communicade" is used as a term for "communication by text".
Have you seen "communicade" used as an (Am) English word?
No, never.
--
athel
Lewis
2016-02-02 21:42:08 UTC
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Post by MWBradburne
I keep typing "communicade" in my missives, but the telltale red squiggle
chastises me for seemingly inadvertently making up the (Am) English word.
I've never heard of this AmE English word. Doesn't look like a word to
me. Looks like marketing speak or some equally offal<1> jargon.

There appears to be a company named Communicade.
Post by MWBradburne
Given that discrepancy between what *I* seem to inherently have stored in
my mental memory against the lack of any decent search hits, I must ask
you, the esteemed Gentlemen of English, whether it's *your* experience
that "communicade" is used as a term for "communication by text".
Nope.
Post by MWBradburne
Have you seen "communicade" used as an (Am) English word?
Nope.

<1> This is intentional
--
I WAS NOT TOUCHED "THERE" BY AN ANGEL Bart chalkboard Ep. BABF14
Stan Brown
2016-02-02 23:39:04 UTC
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Post by MWBradburne
Have you seen "communicade" used as an (Am) English word?
No, never.
--
Stan Brown, Oak Road Systems, Tompkins County, New York, USA
http://BrownMath.com/
http://OakRoadSystems.com/
"The difference between the /almost right/ word and the
/right/ word is ... the difference between the lightning-bug
and the lightning." --Mark Twain
j***@gmail.com
2016-04-23 15:59:51 UTC
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Permalink
Post by MWBradburne
I keep typing "communicade" in my missives, but the telltale red squiggle
chastises me for seemingly inadvertently making up the (Am) English word.
I was *sure* I had seen the word used so many times that it comes naturally
to the tips of my fingers as I type.
A quick google for "is communicade a word or not?", nets zilch.
https://duckduckgo.com/html?q=is+communicade+a+word+or+not%3F
Given that discrepancy between what *I* seem to inherently have stored in
my mental memory against the lack of any decent search hits, I must ask
you, the esteemed Gentlemen of English, whether it's *your* experience
that "communicade" is used as a term for "communication by text".
Have you seen "communicade" used as an (Am) English word?
I am almost certain that communicade is indeed a word, though perhaps not considered American English. As I recall, it is another term for issuing a missive to one's followers. I am having as little luck as you finding any relevant source material online however. :P
Richard Tobin
2016-04-23 16:47:10 UTC
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Post by j***@gmail.com
Post by MWBradburne
Have you seen "communicade" used as an (Am) English word?
I am almost certain that communicade is indeed a word, though perhaps
not considered American English. As I recall, it is another term for
issuing a missive to one's followers. I am having as little luck as you
finding any relevant source material online however. :P
Are you perhaps thinking of "communique" (possibly with an accent)?
For example:

https://www.churchtimes.co.uk/articles/2016/22-january/news/uk/primates-issue-full-communiqu%C3%A9-which-includes-condemnation-of-homophobia

-- Richard
Whiskers
2016-04-23 17:35:03 UTC
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Post by Richard Tobin
Post by j***@gmail.com
Post by MWBradburne
Have you seen "communicade" used as an (Am) English word?
I am almost certain that communicade is indeed a word, though perhaps
not considered American English. As I recall, it is another term for
issuing a missive to one's followers. I am having as little luck as you
finding any relevant source material online however. :P
Are you perhaps thinking of "communique" (possibly with an accent)?
https://www.churchtimes.co.uk/articles/2016/22-january/news/uk/primates-issue-full-communiqu%C3%A9-which-includes-condemnation-of-homophobia
-- Richard
From which the past tense verb communiquéed might be imagined. I've
never seen it in writing though, and don't expect to. But the sort of
people who communiqué are capable of all manner of things. The rest of
us manage to communicate without it.
--
-- ^^^^^^^^^^
-- Whiskers
-- ~~~~~~~~~~
Sam Plusnet
2016-04-23 17:44:39 UTC
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Post by Whiskers
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by j***@gmail.com
Post by MWBradburne
Have you seen "communicade" used as an (Am) English word?
I am almost certain that communicade is indeed a word, though perhaps
not considered American English. As I recall, it is another term for
issuing a missive to one's followers. I am having as little luck as you
finding any relevant source material online however. :P
Are you perhaps thinking of "communique" (possibly with an accent)?
https://www.churchtimes.co.uk/articles/2016/22-january/news/uk/primates-issue-full-communiqu%C3%A9-which-includes-condemnation-of-homophobia
-- Richard
From which the past tense verb communiquéed might be imagined. I've
never seen it in writing though, and don't expect to. But the sort of
people who communiqué are capable of all manner of things. The rest of
us manage to communicate without it.
A communicade must be a barricade formed when an organisation or system
sends so many outgoing messages that incoming messages stand no chance
of success.
Anton Shepelev
2016-04-23 17:47:03 UTC
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Have you seen "communicade" used as an (Am) En-
glish word?
If there be such a word, it must be a noun, like
'ambuscade', 'brigade', 'cascade', 'decade', 'es-
capade', 'facade', 'glissade', 'hexade', &c.
--
() ascii ribbon campaign - against html e-mail
/\ http://preview.tinyurl.com/qcy6mjc [archived]
Anton Shepelev
2016-04-23 17:48:15 UTC
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Permalink
Have you seen "communicade" used as an (Am) En-
glish word?
If there be such a word, it must be a noun, like
'ambuscade', 'brigade', 'cascade', 'decade', 'es-
capade', 'facade', 'glissade', 'hexade', &c.
What could it mean? A outburst of e-mail exchange?
I newsgroup thread?
--
() ascii ribbon campaign - against html e-mail
/\ http://preview.tinyurl.com/qcy6mjc [archived]
Robert Bannister
2016-04-23 22:41:03 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Anton Shepelev
Have you seen "communicade" used as an (Am) En-
glish word?
If there be such a word, it must be a noun, like
'ambuscade', 'brigade', 'cascade', 'decade', 'es-
capade', 'facade', 'glissade', 'hexade', &c.
I have only seen a "d" in the realm of communications used in the 'old
English' word "incommunicado".
--
Robert B. born England a long time ago;
Western Australia since 1972
Jerry Friedman
2016-04-24 15:42:26 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Anton Shepelev
Have you seen "communicade" used as an (Am) En-
glish word?
If there be such a word, it must be a noun, like
'ambuscade', 'brigade', 'cascade', 'decade', 'es-
capade', 'facade', 'glissade', 'hexade', &c.
Unless it's like "evade" and "pervade". Also, "ambuscade", "cascade",
and "glissade" can be verbs as well as nouns, as can various other words
with the suffix -ade.
--
Jerry Friedman
"No Trump" bridge-themed political shirts: cafepress.com/jerrysdesigns
Bumper stickers ditto: cafepress/jerrysstickers
Anton Shepelev
2016-04-25 08:19:33 UTC
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Post by Jerry Friedman
Have you seen "communicade" used as an (Am)
English word?
If there be such a word, it must be a noun, like
'ambuscade', 'brigade', 'cascade', 'decade',
'escapade', 'facade', 'glissade', 'hexade', &c.
Unless it's like "evade" and "pervade".
In those 'ade' is part of the Latin root 'vade(re)'.
Post by Jerry Friedman
Also, "ambuscade", "cascade", and "glissade" can
be verbs as well as nouns, as can various other
words with the suffix -ade.
I think these are verbed nouns in which 'ade' is a
proper suffix, i.e. it was a suffix in the original
word. Am I wrong?
--
() ascii ribbon campaign - against html e-mail
/\ http://preview.tinyurl.com/qcy6mjc [archived]
Jerry Friedman
2016-04-25 18:32:08 UTC
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Post by Anton Shepelev
Post by Jerry Friedman
Have you seen "communicade" used as an (Am)
English word?
If there be such a word, it must be a noun, like
'ambuscade', 'brigade', 'cascade', 'decade',
'escapade', 'facade', 'glissade', 'hexade', &c.
Unless it's like "evade" and "pervade".
In those 'ade' is part of the Latin root 'vade(re)'.
Well, I knew it was part of some Latin root.
Post by Anton Shepelev
Post by Jerry Friedman
Also, "ambuscade", "cascade", and "glissade" can
be verbs as well as nouns, as can various other
words with the suffix -ade.
I think these are verbed nouns in which 'ade' is a
proper suffix, i.e. it was a suffix in the original
word. Am I wrong?
Nope.
--
Jerry Friedman
David Kleinecke
2016-04-27 21:06:47 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Anton Shepelev
Post by Jerry Friedman
Have you seen "communicade" used as an (Am)
English word?
If there be such a word, it must be a noun, like
'ambuscade', 'brigade', 'cascade', 'decade',
'escapade', 'facade', 'glissade', 'hexade', &c.
Unless it's like "evade" and "pervade".
In those 'ade' is part of the Latin root 'vade(re)'.
Well, I knew it was part of some Latin root.
Post by Anton Shepelev
Post by Jerry Friedman
Also, "ambuscade", "cascade", and "glissade" can
be verbs as well as nouns, as can various other
words with the suffix -ade.
I think these are verbed nouns in which 'ade' is a
proper suffix, i.e. it was a suffix in the original
word. Am I wrong?
Nope.
--
Jerry Friedman
I think "communicade" has the sense of "parade" or "cavalcade".
A long series of communications.
A***@alum.wpi.edu
2016-04-27 22:52:15 UTC
Reply
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Post by David Kleinecke
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Anton Shepelev
Post by Jerry Friedman
Have you seen "communicade" used as an (Am)
English word?
If there be such a word, it must be a noun, like
'ambuscade', 'brigade', 'cascade', 'decade',
'escapade', 'facade', 'glissade', 'hexade', &c.
Unless it's like "evade" and "pervade".
In those 'ade' is part of the Latin root 'vade(re)'.
Well, I knew it was part of some Latin root.
Post by Anton Shepelev
Post by Jerry Friedman
Also, "ambuscade", "cascade", and "glissade" can
be verbs as well as nouns, as can various other
words with the suffix -ade.
I think these are verbed nouns in which 'ade' is a
proper suffix, i.e. it was a suffix in the original
word. Am I wrong?
Nope.
--
Jerry Friedman
I think "communicade" has the sense of "parade" or "cavalcade".
A long series of communications.
I hear that, but I also hear echos of the Canuckistani "parkade" and of "blockade," a penning-up of communication.

AN "There's a bear in the Communicade!" McC
bill van
2016-04-28 06:36:08 UTC
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Post by David Kleinecke
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Anton Shepelev
Post by Jerry Friedman
Have you seen "communicade" used as an (Am)
English word?
If there be such a word, it must be a noun, like
'ambuscade', 'brigade', 'cascade', 'decade',
'escapade', 'facade', 'glissade', 'hexade', &c.
Unless it's like "evade" and "pervade".
In those 'ade' is part of the Latin root 'vade(re)'.
Well, I knew it was part of some Latin root.
Post by Anton Shepelev
Post by Jerry Friedman
Also, "ambuscade", "cascade", and "glissade" can
be verbs as well as nouns, as can various other
words with the suffix -ade.
I think these are verbed nouns in which 'ade' is a
proper suffix, i.e. it was a suffix in the original
word. Am I wrong?
Nope.
I think "communicade" has the sense of "parade" or "cavalcade".
A long series of communications.
Can you point to some examples of that usage in the wild? I searched for
it a few days ago, and found only commercial brand names and
misspellings. I don't believe it is a word with usage in the real world.
--
bill
A***@alum.wpi.edu
2016-04-28 06:50:46 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by bill van
Post by David Kleinecke
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Anton Shepelev
Post by Jerry Friedman
Have you seen "communicade" used as an (Am)
English word?
If there be such a word, it must be a noun, like
'ambuscade', 'brigade', 'cascade', 'decade',
'escapade', 'facade', 'glissade', 'hexade', &c.
Unless it's like "evade" and "pervade".
In those 'ade' is part of the Latin root 'vade(re)'.
Well, I knew it was part of some Latin root.
Post by Anton Shepelev
Post by Jerry Friedman
Also, "ambuscade", "cascade", and "glissade" can
be verbs as well as nouns, as can various other
words with the suffix -ade.
I think these are verbed nouns in which 'ade' is a
proper suffix, i.e. it was a suffix in the original
word. Am I wrong?
Nope.
I think "communicade" has the sense of "parade" or "cavalcade".
A long series of communications.
Can you point to some examples of that usage in the wild? I searched for
it a few days ago, and found only commercial brand names and
misspellings. I don't believe it is a word with usage in the real world.
I didn't think he was necessarily pointing out real-world usage,
but rather the impression it suggested. What your first guess
would be if you heard it cold.

ANMcC
David Kleinecke
2016-04-28 16:32:32 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by A***@alum.wpi.edu
Post by bill van
Post by David Kleinecke
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Anton Shepelev
Post by Jerry Friedman
Have you seen "communicade" used as an (Am)
English word?
If there be such a word, it must be a noun, like
'ambuscade', 'brigade', 'cascade', 'decade',
'escapade', 'facade', 'glissade', 'hexade', &c.
Unless it's like "evade" and "pervade".
In those 'ade' is part of the Latin root 'vade(re)'.
Well, I knew it was part of some Latin root.
Post by Anton Shepelev
Post by Jerry Friedman
Also, "ambuscade", "cascade", and "glissade" can
be verbs as well as nouns, as can various other
words with the suffix -ade.
I think these are verbed nouns in which 'ade' is a
proper suffix, i.e. it was a suffix in the original
word. Am I wrong?
Nope.
I think "communicade" has the sense of "parade" or "cavalcade".
A long series of communications.
Can you point to some examples of that usage in the wild? I searched for
it a few days ago, and found only commercial brand names and
misspellings. I don't believe it is a word with usage in the real world.
I didn't think he was necessarily pointing out real-world usage,
but rather the impression it suggested. What your first guess
would be if you heard it cold.
Bingo. I am waiting for a good place to actually use it.
bill van
2016-04-28 17:24:43 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by David Kleinecke
Post by A***@alum.wpi.edu
Post by bill van
Post by David Kleinecke
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Anton Shepelev
Post by Jerry Friedman
Have you seen "communicade" used as an (Am)
English word?
If there be such a word, it must be a noun, like
'ambuscade', 'brigade', 'cascade', 'decade',
'escapade', 'facade', 'glissade', 'hexade', &c.
Unless it's like "evade" and "pervade".
In those 'ade' is part of the Latin root 'vade(re)'.
Well, I knew it was part of some Latin root.
Post by Anton Shepelev
Post by Jerry Friedman
Also, "ambuscade", "cascade", and "glissade" can
be verbs as well as nouns, as can various other
words with the suffix -ade.
I think these are verbed nouns in which 'ade' is a
proper suffix, i.e. it was a suffix in the original
word. Am I wrong?
Nope.
I think "communicade" has the sense of "parade" or "cavalcade".
A long series of communications.
Can you point to some examples of that usage in the wild? I searched for
it a few days ago, and found only commercial brand names and
misspellings. I don't believe it is a word with usage in the real world.
I didn't think he was necessarily pointing out real-world usage,
but rather the impression it suggested. What your first guess
would be if you heard it cold.
Bingo. I am waiting for a good place to actually use it.
As in: Usenet might be dying, but some newsgroups, including aue, still
get their daily communicade of posts?
--
bill
David Kleinecke
2016-04-28 17:36:19 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by bill van
Post by David Kleinecke
Post by A***@alum.wpi.edu
Post by bill van
Post by David Kleinecke
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Anton Shepelev
Post by Jerry Friedman
Have you seen "communicade" used as an (Am)
English word?
If there be such a word, it must be a noun, like
'ambuscade', 'brigade', 'cascade', 'decade',
'escapade', 'facade', 'glissade', 'hexade', &c.
Unless it's like "evade" and "pervade".
In those 'ade' is part of the Latin root 'vade(re)'.
Well, I knew it was part of some Latin root.
Post by Anton Shepelev
Post by Jerry Friedman
Also, "ambuscade", "cascade", and "glissade" can
be verbs as well as nouns, as can various other
words with the suffix -ade.
I think these are verbed nouns in which 'ade' is a
proper suffix, i.e. it was a suffix in the original
word. Am I wrong?
Nope.
I think "communicade" has the sense of "parade" or "cavalcade".
A long series of communications.
Can you point to some examples of that usage in the wild? I searched for
it a few days ago, and found only commercial brand names and
misspellings. I don't believe it is a word with usage in the real world.
I didn't think he was necessarily pointing out real-world usage,
but rather the impression it suggested. What your first guess
would be if you heard it cold.
Bingo. I am waiting for a good place to actually use it.
As in: Usenet might be dying, but some newsgroups, including aue, still
get their daily communicade of posts?
--
bill
Danke Schoen
Peter Moylan
2016-04-24 00:32:55 UTC
Reply
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Post by j***@gmail.com
Post by MWBradburne
Have you seen "communicade" used as an (Am) English word?
I am almost certain that communicade is indeed a word, though perhaps not considered American English. As I recall, it is another term for issuing a missive to one's followers. I am having as little luck as you finding any relevant source material online however. :P
Is it possible that you have both been confused by the fact that many
AmE speakers do not make a clear distinction between /d/ and /t/?
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Peter T. Daniels
2016-04-24 03:46:09 UTC
Reply
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Post by Peter Moylan
Post by j***@gmail.com
Post by MWBradburne
Have you seen "communicade" used as an (Am) English word?
I am almost certain that communicade is indeed a word, though perhaps not considered American English. As I recall, it is another term for issuing a missive to one's followers. I am having as little luck as you finding any relevant source material online however. :P
Is it possible that you have both been confused by the fact that many
AmE speakers do not make a clear distinction between /d/ and /t/?
The distinction is perfectly clear. It simply doesn't correspond with _your_
version of the distinction.
Richard Bollard
2016-04-28 05:29:11 UTC
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On Sun, 24 Apr 2016 10:32:55 +1000, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by j***@gmail.com
Post by MWBradburne
Have you seen "communicade" used as an (Am) English word?
I am almost certain that communicade is indeed a word, though perhaps not considered American English. As I recall, it is another term for issuing a missive to one's followers. I am having as little luck as you finding any relevant source material online however. :P
Is it possible that you have both been confused by the fact that many
AmE speakers do not make a clear distinction between /d/ and /t/?
Coincidentally this morning on the radio I heard an American use a D
sound for a T. Made me think of "pardner" - same consonant. Not sure
which variety of USian she was speaking.
--
Richard Bollard
Canberra Australia

To email, I'm at AMT not spAMT.
bill van
2016-04-24 05:45:47 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by j***@gmail.com
Post by MWBradburne
I keep typing "communicade" in my missives, but the telltale red squiggle
chastises me for seemingly inadvertently making up the (Am) English word.
I was *sure* I had seen the word used so many times that it comes naturally
to the tips of my fingers as I type.
A quick google for "is communicade a word or not?", nets zilch.
https://duckduckgo.com/html?q=is+communicade+a+word+or+not%3F
Given that discrepancy between what *I* seem to inherently have stored in
my mental memory against the lack of any decent search hits, I must ask
you, the esteemed Gentlemen of English, whether it's *your* experience
that "communicade" is used as a term for "communication by text".
Have you seen "communicade" used as an (Am) English word?
I am almost certain that communicade is indeed a word, though perhaps not
considered American English. As I recall, it is another term for issuing a
missive to one's followers. I am having as little luck as you finding any
relevant source material online however. :P
It's not there, and I am certain it is not a real word. It is the name
of several companies involved in communication-related industries, and
the next most common occurrence is as an obvious misspelling. There are
no dictionary definitions of "communicade" to be found. If you are
"almost certain" it is a word, you need to produce some evidence that I
think is not there to be found.
--
bill
Dr. Jai Maharaj
2016-04-23 18:08:12 UTC
Reply
Permalink
In alt.usage.english, in article
I was sure "communicade" was a word (is it not?) >
I keep typing "communicade" in my missives, but the
telltale red squiggle chastises me for seemingly
inadvertently making up the (Am) English word.
I was *sure* I had seen the word used so many times that
it comes naturally to the tips of my fingers as I type.
A quick google for "is communicade a word or not?", nets
zilch.
https://duckduckgo.com/html?q=is+communicade+a+word+or+not%3F
Given that discrepancy between what *I* seem to
inherently have stored in my mental memory against the
lack of any decent search hits, I must ask you, the
esteemed Gentlemen of English, whether it's *your*
experience that "communicade" is used as a term for
"communication by text".
Have you seen "communicade" used as an (Am) English word?
There are thousands of search results for "communicade":

https://www.google.com/search?q=communicade&oq=communicade

English has become a DIY language. And when the use of a
new word becomes popular then dictionaries include it.

Jai Maharaj, Jyotishi
Om Shanti

http://bit.do/jaimaharaj
Dingbat
2016-04-24 05:56:20 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by MWBradburne
I keep typing "communicade" in my missives, but the telltale red squiggle
chastises me for seemingly inadvertently making up the (Am) English word.
Communicate is what you do to cease to be incommunicado.
a***@gmail.com
2016-07-15 22:35:30 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by MWBradburne
I keep typing "communicade" in my missives, but the telltale red squiggle
chastises me for seemingly inadvertently making up the (Am) English word.
I was *sure* I had seen the word used so many times that it comes naturally
to the tips of my fingers as I type.
A quick google for "is communicade a word or not?", nets zilch.
https://duckduckgo.com/html?q=is+communicade+a+word+or+not%3F
Given that discrepancy between what *I* seem to inherently have stored in
my mental memory against the lack of any decent search hits, I must ask
you, the esteemed Gentlemen of English, whether it's *your* experience
that "communicade" is used as a term for "communication by text".
Have you seen "communicade" used as an (Am) English word?
Although my only technical expertise comes in the use of the English language and nothing more, I do know that words are not added to the dictionary each year without having been used before, by many people. And many words do not make it, because the "favorites", the most popular, or the most news-worthy words are selected. That doesn't mean there are many other words floating out there in word "purgatory"...alive in the space between spoken and recognized.

So although the pervasive response has been that the word is illegitimate, I feel that simply using "communicade" lends to its legitimacy because that's how languages work. All languages. Since the dawn of time. Let's keep the rich, artful history of language alive, and grant "communicade" (and its users) a little latitude. Thank you very much.
CDB
2016-07-16 13:53:49 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by a***@gmail.com
Post by MWBradburne
I keep typing "communicade" in my missives, but the telltale red
squiggle chastises me for seemingly inadvertently making up the
(Am) English word.
I was *sure* I had seen the word used so many times that it comes
naturally to the tips of my fingers as I type.
A quick google for "is communicade a word or not?", nets zilch.
https://duckduckgo.com/html?q=is+communicade+a+word+or+not%3F
Given that discrepancy between what *I* seem to inherently have
stored in my mental memory against the lack of any decent search
hits, I must ask you, the esteemed Gentlemen of English, whether
it's *your* experience that "communicade" is used as a term for
"communication by text".
Have you seen "communicade" used as an (Am) English word?
Not much. There was a Black newspaper by that name in the '90s,
according to GoogleBooks, and the legitimate (ie "dictionary") word
"incommunicado" may make the form seem familiar.

Two places to look for this kind of information are GoogleBooks and
OneLook, at these URLs:

https://books.google.ca/bkshp?hl=en&tab=wp

http://www.onelook.com/
Post by a***@gmail.com
Although my only technical expertise comes in the use of the English
language and nothing more, I do know that words are not added to the
dictionary each year without having been used before, by many people.
And many words do not make it, because the "favorites", the most
popular, or the most news-worthy words are selected. That doesn't
mean there are many other words floating out there in word
"purgatory"...alive in the space between spoken and recognized.
So although the pervasive response has been that the word is
illegitimate, I feel that simply using "communicade" lends to its
legitimacy because that's how languages work. All languages. Since
the dawn of time. Let's keep the rich, artful history of language
alive, and grant "communicade" (and its users) a little latitude.
Thank you very much.
What do you want the word to mean? Is it a variant form, or perhaps a
replacement, for "communicate"? I could see it meaning "a series of
communiqués", on the pattern of "cavalcade", but that feels like a
nonce-word.
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2016-07-16 15:30:35 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by CDB
Post by a***@gmail.com
Post by MWBradburne
I keep typing "communicade" in my missives, but the telltale red
squiggle chastises me for seemingly inadvertently making up the
(Am) English word.
I was *sure* I had seen the word used so many times that it comes
naturally to the tips of my fingers as I type.
A quick google for "is communicade a word or not?", nets zilch.
https://duckduckgo.com/html?q=is+communicade+a+word+or+not%3F
Given that discrepancy between what *I* seem to inherently have
stored in my mental memory against the lack of any decent search
hits, I must ask you, the esteemed Gentlemen of English, whether
it's *your* experience that "communicade" is used as a term for
"communication by text".
Have you seen "communicade" used as an (Am) English word?
Not much. There was a Black newspaper by that name in the '90s,
according to GoogleBooks, and the legitimate (ie "dictionary") word
"incommunicado" may make the form seem familiar.
There was (is?) a business with that name:
http://www.bloomberg.com/research/stocks/private/snapshot.asp?privcapId=90394

As of May 2001, Communicade was acquired by Seneca Investments LLC.
Omnicom transferred all employees and holdings of its Communicade
unit to Seneca Investments LLC, a joint venture between Omnicom and
Pegasus Investments. Communicade is a division of Omnicom Group that
focuses on interactive and digital marketing services companies,
while also providing assistance to other Omnicom Group units in the
development of their digital strategies. It owns and manages
investments in a group of market leaders involved in helping clients
build their businesses in the digital economy. Communicade is based
in New York, New York.

Founded in 1996
Post by CDB
Two places to look for this kind of information are GoogleBooks and
https://books.google.ca/bkshp?hl=en&tab=wp
http://www.onelook.com/
Post by a***@gmail.com
Although my only technical expertise comes in the use of the English
language and nothing more, I do know that words are not added to the
dictionary each year without having been used before, by many people.
And many words do not make it, because the "favorites", the most
popular, or the most news-worthy words are selected. That doesn't
mean there are many other words floating out there in word
"purgatory"...alive in the space between spoken and recognized.
So although the pervasive response has been that the word is
illegitimate, I feel that simply using "communicade" lends to its
legitimacy because that's how languages work. All languages. Since
the dawn of time. Let's keep the rich, artful history of language
alive, and grant "communicade" (and its users) a little latitude.
Thank you very much.
What do you want the word to mean? Is it a variant form, or perhaps a
replacement, for "communicate"? I could see it meaning "a series of
communiqués", on the pattern of "cavalcade", but that feels like a
nonce-word.
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
n***@yahoo.com
2016-07-29 19:06:01 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by CDB
Post by a***@gmail.com
Post by MWBradburne
I keep typing "communicade" in my missives, but the telltale red
squiggle chastises me for seemingly inadvertently making up the
(Am) English word.
I was *sure* I had seen the word used so many times that it comes
naturally to the tips of my fingers as I type.
A quick google for "is communicade a word or not?", nets zilch.
https://duckduckgo.com/html?q=is+communicade+a+word+or+not%3F
Given that discrepancy between what *I* seem to inherently have
stored in my mental memory against the lack of any decent search
hits, I must ask you, the esteemed Gentlemen of English, whether
it's *your* experience that "communicade" is used as a term for
"communication by text".
Have you seen "communicade" used as an (Am) English word?
Not much. There was a Black newspaper by that name in the '90s,
according to GoogleBooks, and the legitimate (ie "dictionary") word
"incommunicado" may make the form seem familiar.
http://www.bloomberg.com/research/stocks/private/snapshot.asp?privcapId=90394
As of May 2001, Communicade was acquired by Seneca Investments LLC.
Omnicom transferred all employees and holdings of its Communicade
unit to Seneca Investments LLC, a joint venture between Omnicom and
Pegasus Investments. Communicade is a division of Omnicom Group that
focuses on interactive and digital marketing services companies,
while also providing assistance to other Omnicom Group units in the
development of their digital strategies. It owns and manages
investments in a group of market leaders involved in helping clients
build their businesses in the digital economy. Communicade is based
in New York, New York.
Founded in 1996
Post by CDB
Two places to look for this kind of information are GoogleBooks and
https://books.google.ca/bkshp?hl=en&tab=wp
http://www.onelook.com/
Post by a***@gmail.com
Although my only technical expertise comes in the use of the English
language and nothing more, I do know that words are not added to the
dictionary each year without having been used before, by many people.
And many words do not make it, because the "favorites", the most
popular, or the most news-worthy words are selected. That doesn't
mean there are many other words floating out there in word
"purgatory"...alive in the space between spoken and recognized.
So although the pervasive response has been that the word is
illegitimate, I feel that simply using "communicade" lends to its
legitimacy because that's how languages work. All languages. Since
the dawn of time. Let's keep the rich, artful history of language
alive, and grant "communicade" (and its users) a little latitude.
Thank you very much.
What do you want the word to mean? Is it a variant form, or perhaps a
replacement, for "communicate"? I could see it meaning "a series of
communiqués", on the pattern of "cavalcade", but that feels like a
nonce-word.
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
It came from Star Trek.
m***@gmail.com
2016-11-01 17:42:46 UTC
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Permalink
I have heard it used on TV, like in the context of an agency sending a (possibly confidential) message. Shows like The Man from Uncle, or maybe a James Bond film.
CDB
2016-11-01 18:03:26 UTC
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Permalink
Post by m***@gmail.com
I have heard it used on TV, like in the context of an agency sending
a (possibly confidential) message. Shows like The Man from Uncle, or
maybe a James Bond film.
Even Google couldn't find the word for me. I think you must have
been hearing "communiqué":

"an official announcement about a usually very important piece of news".

http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/communiqué

That's not an exact match for what you describe, but the word is French
for "something communicated", so it might have been considered close enough.
Rich Ulrich
2016-11-02 05:56:09 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by CDB
Post by m***@gmail.com
I have heard it used on TV, like in the context of an agency sending
a (possibly confidential) message. Shows like The Man from Uncle, or
maybe a James Bond film.
Even Google couldn't find the word for me. I think you must have
"an official announcement about a usually very important piece of news".
http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/communiqué
That's not an exact match for what you describe, but the word is French
for "something communicated", so it might have been considered close enough.
Somewhere around that context of receiving messages or /not/,
could you have heard, "incommunicado"?
--
Rich Ulrich
Dingbat
2016-11-02 07:37:39 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by MWBradburne
I keep typing "communicade" in my missives,
If you were to fire them with arrows, they might be communcades:-)
Post by MWBradburne
but the telltale red squiggle
chastises me for seemingly inadvertently making up the (Am) English word.
m***@gmail.com
2017-03-28 03:32:37 UTC
Reply
Permalink
I've not seen it in use but have definitely heard it - seriously I believe they used it on Star Trek where there would be a communicade from the crew who had beamed down onto a planet. I guess Star Trek could have coined it but I always assumed it was quasi-military speak. I was online also looking for it to see if I could use it in written communication, but can find no definition.
Peter Moylan
2017-03-28 05:00:17 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by m***@gmail.com
I've not seen it in use but have definitely heard it - seriously I believe they used it on Star Trek where there would be a communicade from the crew who had beamed down onto a planet. I guess Star Trek could have coined it but I always assumed it was quasi-military speak. I was online also looking for it to see if I could use it in written communication, but can find no definition.
Didn't I see an almost identical posting years ago? Look up that thread
and I think you'll find the consensus: communicade is not a word.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Mark Brader
2017-03-28 10:52:04 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by m***@gmail.com
I've not seen it in use but have definitely heard it - seriously I
believe they used it on Star Trek where there would be a communicade
from the crew who had beamed down onto a planet...
No, they didn't.
Post by Peter Moylan
Didn't I see an almost identical posting years ago?
No, but you saw the same subject line. Actually it was only just
over a year ago.
Post by Peter Moylan
communicade is not a word.
Yes.

It might be a confusion with the word "communique", which is taken from
French and ends in the sound "kay" (not "kade").
--
Mark Brader, Toronto | "The truth will set you free,
***@vex.net | but first it will make you miserable."

My text in this article is in the public domain.
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2017-03-28 11:28:06 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Mark Brader
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by m***@gmail.com
I've not seen it in use but have definitely heard it - seriously I
believe they used it on Star Trek where there would be a communicade
from the crew who had beamed down onto a planet...
No, they didn't.
Post by Peter Moylan
Didn't I see an almost identical posting years ago?
No, but you saw the same subject line. Actually it was only just
over a year ago.
Post by Peter Moylan
communicade is not a word.
Yes.
It might be a confusion with the word "communique", which is taken from
French and ends in the sound "kay" (not "kade").
I wouldn't myself use "communiqué" as a verb, but some people might, in
which case the past participle would be "communiquéd" or "communiquéed".
--
athel
Peter Moylan
2017-03-31 04:42:28 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Mark Brader
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by m***@gmail.com
I've not seen it in use but have definitely heard it - seriously I
believe they used it on Star Trek where there would be a communicade
from the crew who had beamed down onto a planet...
No, they didn't.
Post by Peter Moylan
Didn't I see an almost identical posting years ago?
No, but you saw the same subject line. Actually it was only just
over a year ago.
Post by Peter Moylan
communicade is not a word.
Yes.
It might be a confusion with the word "communique", which is taken from
French and ends in the sound "kay" (not "kade").
I wouldn't myself use "communiqué" as a verb, but some people might, in
which case the past participle would be "communiquéd" or "communiquéed".
Hmm. You've just added a -ed to a French past participle to turn it into
an English past participle, and the result looks ugly in both languages.

The usual process of importing a French verb into English would give us
"communicate"; but if instead we import the noun we would get
"communication". Now, if somebody wants to verb that, the past
participle would be "communicationed".
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2017-03-28 11:54:45 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Mark Brader
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by m***@gmail.com
I've not seen it in use but have definitely heard it - seriously I
believe they used it on Star Trek where there would be a communicade
from the crew who had beamed down onto a planet...
No, they didn't.
Post by Peter Moylan
Didn't I see an almost identical posting years ago?
No, but you saw the same subject line. Actually it was only just
over a year ago.
Post by Peter Moylan
communicade is not a word.
Yes.
It might be a confusion with the word "communique", which is taken from
French and ends in the sound "kay" (not "kade").
Communicade is used in a specialist context. It seem to be used to mena
"advertising" or the organising of advertising.

http://adage.com/article/news/omnicom-s-communicade-crew/341/

Omnicom's Communicade crew

The page contains details of a number of advertising egencies, etc.

The page was "Published on March 10, 1997".

I guess that the word is constructed from "communic(ate/ation)" and the
suffix "-ade".

OED:

-ade, suffix

Origin: Of multiple origins. Partly a borrowing from French. Partly
a borrowing from Occitan. Etymons: French -ade; Occitan -ada,
Spanish -ada, Italian -ata.
Etymology: < French -ade... (Show More)

1. Forming nouns denoting an action or activity (esp. a protracted
one), and freq. by extension a body concerned with this, or in some
cases denoting the result of an activity or having collective force,
as blockade n., cannonade n., masquerade n.

A cannonade is:

a. A continued discharge of cannon,...

There might have been a lurking pun in "communicade": "communicaid",
based on the idea that communicade agencies "aid" their clients to
communicate with the public.

LinkedIn has an entry for
https://www.linkedin.com/company/communicade-consulting-ltd

Communicade Consulting Ltd is a Marketing and Advertising company
located in 24309 U St, Ocean Park, Washington, United States.

There was, in the UK,
https://beta.companieshouse.gov.uk/company/07188114

COMMUNICADE LIMITED

In New Zealand there was short-lived magazine named Communicade.
http://www.upthepunks.co.nz/wiki/index.php?title=Communicade

Communicade

Produced by members of the Hutt Valley punk band Compos Mentis,
Communicade lasted only three issues from 1985 before tensions
within the band led both the zine and the group to split in 1986.
Featuring contributions from Craig, David, Grant, Heather and Simon,
Communicade covered the New Zealand underground punk scene as well
as printing reports, interviews and articles on Australia, the UK,
Italy and the USA from an anarcho-punk perspective.
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Robert Bannister
2017-03-28 23:04:36 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by Mark Brader
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by m***@gmail.com
I've not seen it in use but have definitely heard it - seriously I
believe they used it on Star Trek where there would be a communicade
from the crew who had beamed down onto a planet...
No, they didn't.
Post by Peter Moylan
Didn't I see an almost identical posting years ago?
No, but you saw the same subject line. Actually it was only just
over a year ago.
Post by Peter Moylan
communicade is not a word.
Yes.
It might be a confusion with the word "communique", which is taken from
French and ends in the sound "kay" (not "kade").
Communicade is used in a specialist context. It seem to be used to mena
"advertising" or the organising of advertising.
http://adage.com/article/news/omnicom-s-communicade-crew/341/
Omnicom's Communicade crew
The page contains details of a number of advertising egencies, etc.
The page was "Published on March 10, 1997".
I guess that the word is constructed from "communic(ate/ation)" and the
suffix "-ade".
-ade, suffix
Origin: Of multiple origins. Partly a borrowing from French. Partly
a borrowing from Occitan. Etymons: French -ade; Occitan -ada,
Spanish -ada, Italian -ata.
Etymology: < French -ade... (Show More)
1. Forming nouns denoting an action or activity (esp. a protracted
one), and freq. by extension a body concerned with this, or in some
cases denoting the result of an activity or having collective force,
as blockade n., cannonade n., masquerade n.
a. A continued discharge of cannon,...
There might have been a lurking pun in "communicade": "communicaid",
based on the idea that communicade agencies "aid" their clients to
communicate with the public.
LinkedIn has an entry for
https://www.linkedin.com/company/communicade-consulting-ltd
Communicade Consulting Ltd is a Marketing and Advertising company
located in 24309 U St, Ocean Park, Washington, United States.
There was, in the UK,
https://beta.companieshouse.gov.uk/company/07188114
COMMUNICADE LIMITED
In New Zealand there was short-lived magazine named Communicade.
http://www.upthepunks.co.nz/wiki/index.php?title=Communicade
Communicade
Produced by members of the Hutt Valley punk band Compos Mentis,
Communicade lasted only three issues from 1985 before tensions
within the band led both the zine and the group to split in 1986.
Featuring contributions from Craig, David, Grant, Heather and Simon,
Communicade covered the New Zealand underground punk scene as well
as printing reports, interviews and articles on Australia, the UK,
Italy and the USA from an anarcho-punk perspective.
But not really like lemonade, orangeade, raspberryade...
--
Robert B. born England a long time ago;
Western Australia since 1972
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2017-03-29 09:38:52 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Wed, 29 Mar 2017 07:04:36 +0800, Robert Bannister
Post by Robert Bannister
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by Mark Brader
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by m***@gmail.com
I've not seen it in use but have definitely heard it - seriously I
believe they used it on Star Trek where there would be a communicade
from the crew who had beamed down onto a planet...
No, they didn't.
Post by Peter Moylan
Didn't I see an almost identical posting years ago?
No, but you saw the same subject line. Actually it was only just
over a year ago.
Post by Peter Moylan
communicade is not a word.
Yes.
It might be a confusion with the word "communique", which is taken from
French and ends in the sound "kay" (not "kade").
Communicade is used in a specialist context. It seem to be used to mena
"advertising" or the organising of advertising.
http://adage.com/article/news/omnicom-s-communicade-crew/341/
Omnicom's Communicade crew
The page contains details of a number of advertising egencies, etc.
The page was "Published on March 10, 1997".
I guess that the word is constructed from "communic(ate/ation)" and the
suffix "-ade".
-ade, suffix
Origin: Of multiple origins. Partly a borrowing from French. Partly
a borrowing from Occitan. Etymons: French -ade; Occitan -ada,
Spanish -ada, Italian -ata.
Etymology: < French -ade... (Show More)
1. Forming nouns denoting an action or activity (esp. a protracted
one), and freq. by extension a body concerned with this, or in some
cases denoting the result of an activity or having collective force,
as blockade n., cannonade n., masquerade n.
a. A continued discharge of cannon,...
There might have been a lurking pun in "communicade": "communicaid",
based on the idea that communicade agencies "aid" their clients to
communicate with the public.
LinkedIn has an entry for
https://www.linkedin.com/company/communicade-consulting-ltd
Communicade Consulting Ltd is a Marketing and Advertising company
located in 24309 U St, Ocean Park, Washington, United States.
There was, in the UK,
https://beta.companieshouse.gov.uk/company/07188114
COMMUNICADE LIMITED
In New Zealand there was short-lived magazine named Communicade.
http://www.upthepunks.co.nz/wiki/index.php?title=Communicade
Communicade
Produced by members of the Hutt Valley punk band Compos Mentis,
Communicade lasted only three issues from 1985 before tensions
within the band led both the zine and the group to split in 1986.
Featuring contributions from Craig, David, Grant, Heather and Simon,
Communicade covered the New Zealand underground punk scene as well
as printing reports, interviews and articles on Australia, the UK,
Italy and the USA from an anarcho-punk perspective.
But not really like lemonade, orangeade, raspberryade...
Indeed. The OED lists those separately from the other -ades.
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Whiskers
2017-03-28 12:30:15 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Mark Brader
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by m***@gmail.com
I've not seen it in use but have definitely heard it - seriously I
believe they used it on Star Trek where there would be a communicade
from the crew who had beamed down onto a planet...
No, they didn't.
Post by Peter Moylan
Didn't I see an almost identical posting years ago?
No, but you saw the same subject line. Actually it was only just
over a year ago.
If that; here it is, last November:
<https://groups.google.com/forum/#!topicsearchin/alt.usage.english/subject$3Acommunicade$20AND$20before$3A2017$2F03$2F01>
<http://preview.tinyurl.com/jwrdqh9>

(Hey! A Google Groups search that worked - after I'd specified a
'before' date; it only found today's thread without that).
Post by Mark Brader
Post by Peter Moylan
communicade is not a word.
Yes.
It might be a confusion with the word "communique", which is taken from
French and ends in the sound "kay" (not "kade").
Or hearing a speaker with a weak or dropped 't' in 'communicated'.
--
-- ^^^^^^^^^^
-- Whiskers
-- ~~~~~~~~~~
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2017-03-28 11:38:50 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by m***@gmail.com
I've not seen it in use but have definitely heard it - seriously I believe
they used it on Star Trek where there would be a communicade from the crew
who had beamed down onto a planet.
Maybe something like this: After they received the communiqué doc said ..."
Post by m***@gmail.com
I guess Star Trek could have coined it b
ut I always assumed it was quasi-military speak. I was online also looking
for it to see if I could use it in written communication, but can find no d
efinition.
--
athel
p***@yahoo.com
2018-02-17 00:51:40 UTC
Reply
Permalink
You are thinking of the French "Communiqué", which is in fact a written memo. I have had exactly e same dilemma as you with "Communicade"...I think I picked it up from some WWII book or film, because in my mind it was a word relating to military or state written communications. Considering the relations between France, England and America during WWII, one can certainly imagine how an American officer or operative my have picked up and used an Anglicized version of the word.
Stefan Ram
2018-02-17 01:11:50 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by p***@yahoo.com
"Communicade"
There is "incommunicado".
CDB
2018-02-18 08:22:24 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On 2/16/2018 7:51 PM, ***@yahoo.com wrote:

[Re: I was sure "communicade" was a word (is it not?)]
Post by p***@yahoo.com
You are thinking of the French "Communiqué", which is in fact a
written memo. I have had exactly e same dilemma as you with
"Communicade"...I think I picked it up from some WWII book or film,
because in my mind it was a word relating to military or state
written communications. Considering the relations between France,
England and America during WWII, one can certainly imagine how an
American officer or operative my have picked up and used an
Anglicized version of the word.
FWIW, the Spanish equivalent of "communiqué" is "comunicado".

http://www.wordreference.com/es/en/translation.asp?spen=comunicado
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2018-02-18 12:05:45 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by p***@yahoo.com
You are thinking of the French "Communiqué", which is in fact a written memo. I have had exactly e same dilemma as you with "Communicade"...I think I picked it up from some WWII book or film, because in my mind it was a word relating to military or state written communications. Considering the relations between France, England and America during WWII, one can certainly imagine how an American officer or operative my have picked up and used an Anglicized version of the word.
We had a discussion on this two years ago. My contribution was:

<quote>
Communicade is used in a specialist context. It seem to be used to mena
"advertising" or the organising of advertising.

http://adage.com/article/news/omnicom-s-communicade-crew/341/

Omnicom's Communicade crew

The page contains details of a number of advertising egencies, etc.

The page was "Published on March 10, 1997".

I guess that the word is constructed from "communic(ate/ation)" and the
suffix "-ade".

OED:

-ade, suffix

Origin: Of multiple origins. Partly a borrowing from French. Partly
a borrowing from Occitan. Etymons: French -ade; Occitan -ada,
Spanish -ada, Italian -ata.
Etymology: < French -ade... (Show More)

1. Forming nouns denoting an action or activity (esp. a protracted
one), and freq. by extension a body concerned with this, or in some
cases denoting the result of an activity or having collective force,
as blockade n., cannonade n., masquerade n.

A cannonade is:

a. A continued discharge of cannon,...

There might have been a lurking pun in "communicade": "communicaid",
based on the idea that communicade agencies "aid" their clients to
communicate with the public.

LinkedIn has an entry for
https://www.linkedin.com/company/communicade-consulting-ltd

Communicade Consulting Ltd is a Marketing and Advertising company
located in 24309 U St, Ocean Park, Washington, United States.

There was, in the UK,
https://beta.companieshouse.gov.uk/company/07188114

COMMUNICADE LIMITED

In New Zealand there was short-lived magazine named Communicade.
http://www.upthepunks.co.nz/wiki/index.php?title=Communicade

Communicade

Produced by members of the Hutt Valley punk band Compos Mentis,
Communicade lasted only three issues from 1985 before tensions
within the band led both the zine and the group to split in 1986.
Featuring contributions from Craig, David, Grant, Heather and Simon,
Communicade covered the New Zealand underground punk scene as well
as printing reports, interviews and articles on Australia, the UK,
Italy and the USA from an anarcho-punk perspective.

<endquote>

The suffix "ade" in fruit drinks is different.

Forming nouns denoting drinks made from the fruit, etc., denoted by
the first element, as orangeade n., gingerade n., cherryade n.
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Peter T. Daniels
2018-02-18 13:08:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by p***@yahoo.com
You are thinking of the French "Communiqué", which is in fact a written memo. I have had exactly e same dilemma as you with "Communicade"...I think I picked it up from some WWII book or film, because in my mind it was a word relating to military or state written communications. Considering the relations between France, England and America during WWII, one can certainly imagine how an American officer or operative my have picked up and used an Anglicized version of the word.
The thread was started on February 2, 2016, and probably holds the record for being revived
(not quite Lazarized) -- there are a number of gaps of several months within the 53 messages.
Ken Blake
2018-02-18 18:11:39 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sun, 18 Feb 2018 12:05:45 +0000, "Peter Duncanson [BrE]"
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
The suffix "ade" in fruit drinks is different.
Forming nouns denoting drinks made from the fruit, etc., denoted by
the first element, as orangeade n., gingerade n., cherryade n.
Gingerade? Made from a fruit?

And of course, that only works with some fruits. I've never heard of
tomatoade, zucchiniade (courgetteade, if you prefer),
butternutsquashade, or even watermelonade, canteloupeade,
blueberryade, etc.
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2018-02-18 20:14:19 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Ken Blake
On Sun, 18 Feb 2018 12:05:45 +0000, "Peter Duncanson [BrE]"
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
The suffix "ade" in fruit drinks is different.
Forming nouns denoting drinks made from the fruit, etc., denoted by
the first element, as orangeade n., gingerade n., cherryade n.
Gingerade? Made from a fruit?
Apparently. Ginger is not a fruit, but gingerade seems to be a gingered
fruit juice: Lemon, Lime, Apple, for example.

So the OED definition is partly right and party wrong. Gingerade is made
from fruit, but the first element of the word does not denote the fruit.

There is a recipe for Turmeric Gingerade which contains:

6-7 cups fresh apple juice...
1-3 tablespoons fresh turmeric root...
1/8 cup – 1/4 cup, unpeeled ginger root
3/4 cup fresh lemon juice...

https://www.feastingathome.com/turmeric-gingerade/
Post by Ken Blake
And of course, that only works with some fruits. I've never heard of
tomatoade, zucchiniade (courgetteade, if you prefer),
butternutsquashade, or even watermelonade, canteloupeade,
blueberryade, etc.
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Peter T. Daniels
2018-02-18 20:39:22 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by Ken Blake
On Sun, 18 Feb 2018 12:05:45 +0000, "Peter Duncanson [BrE]"
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
The suffix "ade" in fruit drinks is different.
Forming nouns denoting drinks made from the fruit, etc., denoted by
the first element, as orangeade n., gingerade n., cherryade n.
Gingerade? Made from a fruit?
Apparently. Ginger is not a fruit, but gingerade seems to be a gingered
fruit juice: Lemon, Lime, Apple, for example.
So the OED definition is partly right and party wrong. Gingerade is made
from fruit, but the first element of the word does not denote the fruit.
6-7 cups fresh apple juice...
1-3 tablespoons fresh turmeric root...
1/8 cup – 1/4 cup, unpeeled ginger root
3/4 cup fresh lemon juice...
https://www.feastingathome.com/turmeric-gingerade/
I wonder what "gingerade" is called Over Here. I've never heard that term.
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2018-02-18 21:25:42 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sun, 18 Feb 2018 12:39:22 -0800 (PST), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by Ken Blake
On Sun, 18 Feb 2018 12:05:45 +0000, "Peter Duncanson [BrE]"
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
The suffix "ade" in fruit drinks is different.
Forming nouns denoting drinks made from the fruit, etc., denoted by
the first element, as orangeade n., gingerade n., cherryade n.
Gingerade? Made from a fruit?
Apparently. Ginger is not a fruit, but gingerade seems to be a gingered
fruit juice: Lemon, Lime, Apple, for example.
So the OED definition is partly right and party wrong. Gingerade is made
from fruit, but the first element of the word does not denote the fruit.
6-7 cups fresh apple juice...
1-3 tablespoons fresh turmeric root...
1/8 cup – 1/4 cup, unpeeled ginger root
3/4 cup fresh lemon juice...
https://www.feastingathome.com/turmeric-gingerade/
I wonder what "gingerade" is called Over Here. I've never heard that term.
You are between where I am and where the author of that website and
recipe is. She says:

Welcome to Feasting at Home! I’m Sylvia Fountaine, former
restaurant owner, caterer and chef living in the Pacific Northwest –
sharing healthy, plant-forward recipes, grounded in the seasons.
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Tony Cooper
2018-02-18 21:52:56 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sun, 18 Feb 2018 20:14:19 +0000, "Peter Duncanson [BrE]"
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by Ken Blake
On Sun, 18 Feb 2018 12:05:45 +0000, "Peter Duncanson [BrE]"
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
The suffix "ade" in fruit drinks is different.
Forming nouns denoting drinks made from the fruit, etc., denoted by
the first element, as orangeade n., gingerade n., cherryade n.
Gingerade? Made from a fruit?
Apparently. Ginger is not a fruit, but gingerade seems to be a gingered
fruit juice: Lemon, Lime, Apple, for example.
Some fast-food restaurants in this area have soda dispensers that
allow one to mix products or to add a flavoring to a product.

When I put my cup in one of those, and push "Diet Coke", the cup fills
with Diet Coke as long as I hold the button down. If I release the
button when the cup is partially full, I can add vanilla-, orange-,
lime-, or lemon-flavored Diet Coke to the cup. (Or, I can fill the
cup with any of those flavored Diet Cokes.

I add about a half-inch of lemon-flavored Diet Coke to my cup after
filling it partially with unflavored Diet Coke.

The machines recently changed to "GingerLemon" instead of just Lemon.
I didn't notice if the flavors are now "Gingerxxxx".
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Peter T. Daniels
2018-02-19 04:24:39 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Tony Cooper
On Sun, 18 Feb 2018 20:14:19 +0000, "Peter Duncanson [BrE]"
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by Ken Blake
On Sun, 18 Feb 2018 12:05:45 +0000, "Peter Duncanson [BrE]"
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
The suffix "ade" in fruit drinks is different.
Forming nouns denoting drinks made from the fruit, etc., denoted by
the first element, as orangeade n., gingerade n., cherryade n.
Gingerade? Made from a fruit?
Apparently. Ginger is not a fruit, but gingerade seems to be a gingered
fruit juice: Lemon, Lime, Apple, for example.
Some fast-food restaurants in this area have soda dispensers that
allow one to mix products or to add a flavoring to a product.
When I put my cup in one of those, and push "Diet Coke", the cup fills
with Diet Coke as long as I hold the button down. If I release the
button when the cup is partially full, I can add vanilla-, orange-,
lime-, or lemon-flavored Diet Coke to the cup. (Or, I can fill the
cup with any of those flavored Diet Cokes.
In fact you can add any product at all offered anywhere in the machine.

I usually do about 3/4 Diet Coke and 1/4 Diet Dr Pepper.
Post by Tony Cooper
I add about a half-inch of lemon-flavored Diet Coke to my cup after
filling it partially with unflavored Diet Coke.
The machines recently changed to "GingerLemon" instead of just Lemon.
I didn't notice if the flavors are now "Gingerxxxx".
I'll look for that, but the syrups added to the diet varieties contain sugar.
David Kleinecke
2018-02-19 05:56:21 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Tony Cooper
On Sun, 18 Feb 2018 20:14:19 +0000, "Peter Duncanson [BrE]"
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by Ken Blake
On Sun, 18 Feb 2018 12:05:45 +0000, "Peter Duncanson [BrE]"
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
The suffix "ade" in fruit drinks is different.
Forming nouns denoting drinks made from the fruit, etc., denoted by
the first element, as orangeade n., gingerade n., cherryade n.
Gingerade? Made from a fruit?
Apparently. Ginger is not a fruit, but gingerade seems to be a gingered
fruit juice: Lemon, Lime, Apple, for example.
Some fast-food restaurants in this area have soda dispensers that
allow one to mix products or to add a flavoring to a product.
When I put my cup in one of those, and push "Diet Coke", the cup fills
with Diet Coke as long as I hold the button down. If I release the
button when the cup is partially full, I can add vanilla-, orange-,
lime-, or lemon-flavored Diet Coke to the cup. (Or, I can fill the
cup with any of those flavored Diet Cokes.
In fact you can add any product at all offered anywhere in the machine.
I usually do about 3/4 Diet Coke and 1/4 Diet Dr Pepper.
Post by Tony Cooper
I add about a half-inch of lemon-flavored Diet Coke to my cup after
filling it partially with unflavored Diet Coke.
The machines recently changed to "GingerLemon" instead of just Lemon.
I didn't notice if the flavors are now "Gingerxxxx".
I'll look for that, but the syrups added to the diet varieties contain sugar.
The only place I ever see belly wash these days is at Costco
where it comes free with my Polish Sausage in the "Food Court".
Fortunately they offer lemonade.
Ken Blake
2018-02-18 22:55:17 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sun, 18 Feb 2018 20:14:19 +0000, "Peter Duncanson [BrE]"
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by Ken Blake
On Sun, 18 Feb 2018 12:05:45 +0000, "Peter Duncanson [BrE]"
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
The suffix "ade" in fruit drinks is different.
Forming nouns denoting drinks made from the fruit, etc., denoted by
the first element, as orangeade n., gingerade n., cherryade n.
Gingerade? Made from a fruit?
Apparently. Ginger is not a fruit
Right.
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
but gingerade seems to be a gingered
fruit juice: Lemon, Lime, Apple, for example.
Those are all new to me. Never seen them.
Madrigal Gurneyhalt
2018-02-18 21:02:26 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Ken Blake
On Sun, 18 Feb 2018 12:05:45 +0000, "Peter Duncanson [BrE]"
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
The suffix "ade" in fruit drinks is different.
Forming nouns denoting drinks made from the fruit, etc., denoted by
the first element, as orangeade n., gingerade n., cherryade n.
Gingerade? Made from a fruit?
No it's made from etc.
Post by Ken Blake
And of course, that only works with some fruits. I've never heard of
tomatoade, zucchiniade (courgetteade, if you prefer),
butternutsquashade, or even watermelonade, canteloupeade,
blueberryade, etc.
Er ... ok!
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2018-02-18 21:36:23 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sun, 18 Feb 2018 13:02:26 -0800 (PST), Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Ken Blake
On Sun, 18 Feb 2018 12:05:45 +0000, "Peter Duncanson [BrE]"
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
The suffix "ade" in fruit drinks is different.
Forming nouns denoting drinks made from the fruit, etc., denoted by
the first element, as orangeade n., gingerade n., cherryade n.
Gingerade? Made from a fruit?
No it's made from etc.
Post by Ken Blake
And of course, that only works with some fruits. I've never heard of
tomatoade, zucchiniade (courgetteade, if you prefer),
butternutsquashade, or even watermelonade, canteloupeade,
blueberryade, etc.
Blueberryade exists with a space or a hyphen:
https://recipes.sparkpeople.com/recipe-detail.asp?recipe=1516409

Blueberry-Ade

Introduction
A drink using blueberry juice instead of lemon juice.
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Er ... ok!
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Snidely
2018-02-20 08:11:47 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by p***@yahoo.com
You are thinking of the French "Communiqué", which is in fact a written
memo. I have had exactly e same dilemma as you with "Communicade"...I think
I picked it up from some WWII book or film, because in my mind it was a word
relating to military or state written communications. Considering the
relations between France, England and America during WWII, one can certainly
imagine how an American officer or operative my have picked up and used an
Anglicized version of the word.
11 months ago for your post that you quote.
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
<quote>
Communicade is used in a specialist context. It seem to be used to mena
"advertising" or the organising of advertising.
http://adage.com/article/news/omnicom-s-communicade-crew/341/
Omnicom's Communicade crew
The page contains details of a number of advertising egencies, etc.
The page was "Published on March 10, 1997".
I guess that the word is constructed from "communic(ate/ation)" and the
suffix "-ade".
-ade, suffix
Origin: Of multiple origins. Partly a borrowing from French. Partly
a borrowing from Occitan. Etymons: French -ade; Occitan -ada,
Spanish -ada, Italian -ata.
Etymology: < French -ade... (Show More)
1. Forming nouns denoting an action or activity (esp. a protracted
one), and freq. by extension a body concerned with this, or in some
cases denoting the result of an activity or having collective force,
as blockade n., cannonade n., masquerade n.
a. A continued discharge of cannon,...
There might have been a lurking pun in "communicade": "communicaid",
based on the idea that communicade agencies "aid" their clients to
communicate with the public.
LinkedIn has an entry for
https://www.linkedin.com/company/communicade-consulting-ltd
Communicade Consulting Ltd is a Marketing and Advertising company
located in 24309 U St, Ocean Park, Washington, United States.
There was, in the UK,
https://beta.companieshouse.gov.uk/company/07188114
COMMUNICADE LIMITED
In New Zealand there was short-lived magazine named Communicade.
http://www.upthepunks.co.nz/wiki/index.php?title=Communicade
Communicade
Produced by members of the Hutt Valley punk band Compos Mentis,
Communicade lasted only three issues from 1985 before tensions
within the band led both the zine and the group to split in 1986.
Featuring contributions from Craig, David, Grant, Heather and Simon,
Communicade covered the New Zealand underground punk scene as well
as printing reports, interviews and articles on Australia, the UK,
Italy and the USA from an anarcho-punk perspective.
<endquote>
The suffix "ade" in fruit drinks is different.
Forming nouns denoting drinks made from the fruit, etc., denoted by
the first element, as orangeade n., gingerade n., cherryade n.
/dps
--
But happiness cannot be pursued; it must ensue. One must have a reason
to 'be happy.'"
Viktor Frankl
p***@yahoo.com
2018-02-17 01:42:50 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by MWBradburne
I keep typing "communicade" in my missives, but the telltale red squiggle
chastises me for seemingly inadvertently making up the (Am) English word.
I was *sure* I had seen the word used so many times that it comes naturally
to the tips of my fingers as I type.
A quick google for "is communicade a word or not?", nets zilch.
https://duckduckgo.com/html?q=is+communicade+a+word+or+not%3F
Given that discrepancy between what *I* seem to inherently have stored in
my mental memory against the lack of any decent search hits, I must ask
you, the esteemed Gentlemen of English, whether it's *your* experience
that "communicade" is used as a term for "communication by text".
Have you seen "communicade" used as an (Am) English word?
I had the same delemma, believe it or not. I believe you are thinking of the French "Communiqué" which in fact is a written message. I also got stumped with "communicade" some time back and believed it to be an English word. In my mind it was a military or state related written communication. I think I must have picked it up from some WWII era book or film. Considering he close relations between France, England and America, one can imagine an American or English operative anglicizing the word or simply borrowing it while stationed overseas.
l***@gmail.com
2018-05-19 13:02:00 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Communicade. I used it in a screenplay The Lawbots.

If not a word it should be. How to define use of:

I needed dialog referring to that the word communication was weak to use.

So this was important to clearly show impact
that this is from a high command controlling communication
with its army followers.

here is the dialog below, if I used communication, it would not have the needed impact, it would sound sissy, it's a supernatural thriller, so I needed it, it also refers to their minds are one in cultic evil power.

like motorcade or a army barricade.

ROB's dialog in screenplay, it has been building up to this point.

Their minds are in communicade with the rounds of the Controller. They project laws that capture souls in prison, they slain our sons and daughters with their lawless Controller.

Maybe even use it like this: He and his army were in divine commuicade with the creator.

Really not needing speech or code, but as one knowing: like Christ knew his Father's Will. A real bonding of heart, mind and soul, knowing someone so great, you know their thoughts and will.

SunnyFilms.World
e***@gmail.com
2019-08-13 15:13:11 UTC
Reply
Permalink
I use it regularly, but was surprised when it wouldn't properly spellcheck just now. So, led to this discussion as I tried to confirm.
bill van
2019-08-13 18:29:44 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by e***@gmail.com
I use it regularly, but was surprised when it wouldn't properly
spellcheck just now. So, led to this discussion as I tried to confirm.
I'd venture that there is no such word, but it could easily be based on
a mishearing
of "communiqué" meaning an official communication. Your use of it wouldn't
raise eyebrows because people would hear it as communiqué.

bill, but didn't we do this just a few months ago?
Ken Blake
2019-08-13 19:28:55 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by bill van
Post by e***@gmail.com
I use it regularly, but was surprised when it wouldn't properly
spellcheck just now. So, led to this discussion as I tried to confirm.
I'd venture that there is no such word, but it could easily be based on
a mishearing
of "communiqué" meaning an official communication. Your use of it wouldn't
raise eyebrows because people would hear it as communiqué.
Or perhaps he was misspelling "communicate."
bill van
2019-08-14 00:19:22 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Ken Blake
Post by bill van
I use it regularly, but was surprised when it wouldn't properly>>
spellcheck just now. So, led to this discussion as I tried to confirm.
I'd venture that there is no such word, but it could easily be based
on>a mishearing
of "communiqué" meaning an official communication. Your use of it wouldn't
raise eyebrows because people would hear it as communiqué.
Or perhaps he was misspelling "communicate."
I don't know. In my CanE, words ending in "ate" tend not have the "t"
sounded as a "d".

bill
Ross
2019-08-14 00:50:17 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by bill van
Post by e***@gmail.com
I use it regularly, but was surprised when it wouldn't properly
spellcheck just now. So, led to this discussion as I tried to confirm.
I'd venture that there is no such word, but it could easily be based on
a mishearing
of "communiqué" meaning an official communication. Your use of it wouldn't
raise eyebrows because people would hear it as communiqué.
bill, but didn't we do this just a few months ago?
Maybe, but I didn't follow it very far. Apologies if this is not a new
idea, but...
Nouns like this are, I think, sometimes used as verbs: I memo'd the director,
I messaged her, ?etc. Could the OP have heard someone say "I communiqué'd
the staff" and creatively misunderstood it as this non-word?
bill van
2019-08-14 05:30:32 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Ross
Post by bill van
I use it regularly, but was surprised when it wouldn't properly> >
spellcheck just now. So, led to this discussion as I tried to confirm.
I'd venture that there is no such word, but it could easily be based
on> a mishearing
of "communiqué" meaning an official communication. Your use of it wouldn't
raise eyebrows because people would hear it as communiqué.
bill, but didn't we do this just a few months ago?
Maybe, but I didn't follow it very far. Apologies if this is not a new
idea, but...
Nouns like this are, I think, sometimes used as verbs: I memo'd the director,
I messaged her, ?etc. Could the OP have heard someone say "I
communiqué'dthe staff" and creatively misunderstood it as this non-word?
Of course that's possible, but I'm not aware of any evidence. Googling on
"communicade" draws some 43,000 hits, but judging from the first few
results pages, there is no pattern, although several of the top hits stem
from previous discussion of the topic on aue. There are some punk
publications and music titles, a few companies trying to coin a hip brand
name, and then there's a gradual drift to similar but different spellings
with equally vague meanings. There are a few hits for communiqued as in
your example, and then off we go into pages and pages of French-language
results with communiqué in them. I don't see any substance.

bill
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2019-08-14 03:46:15 UTC
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Post by bill van
Post by e***@gmail.com
I use it regularly, but was surprised when it wouldn't properly
spellcheck just now. So, led to this discussion as I tried to confirm.
I'd venture that there is no such word, but it could easily be based on
a mishearing
of "communiqué" meaning an official communication. Your use of it wouldn't
raise eyebrows because people would hear it as communiqué.
bill, but didn't we do this just a few months ago?
February 2016
--
athel
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2019-08-14 10:05:09 UTC
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Post by bill van
Post by e***@gmail.com
I use it regularly, but was surprised when it wouldn't properly
spellcheck just now. So, led to this discussion as I tried to confirm.
I'd venture that there is no such word, but it could easily be based on
a mishearing
of "communiqué" meaning an official communication. Your use of it wouldn't
raise eyebrows because people would hear it as communiqué.
bill, but didn't we do this just a few months ago?
This first came up in 2016. The topic was revived last year.
This what I wrot in February 2018:

We had a discussion on this two years ago. My contribution was:

<quoting my post from 2016>
Communicade is used in a specialist context. It seem to be used to mena
"advertising" or the organising of advertising.

http://adage.com/article/news/omnicom-s-communicade-crew/341/

Omnicom's Communicade crew

The page contains details of a number of advertising egencies, etc.

The page was "Published on March 10, 1997".

I guess that the word is constructed from "communic(ate/ation)" and the
suffix "-ade".

OED:

-ade, suffix

Origin: Of multiple origins. Partly a borrowing from French. Partly
a borrowing from Occitan. Etymons: French -ade; Occitan -ada,
Spanish -ada, Italian -ata.
Etymology: < French -ade... (Show More)

1. Forming nouns denoting an action or activity (esp. a protracted
one), and freq. by extension a body concerned with this, or in some
cases denoting the result of an activity or having collective force,
as blockade n., cannonade n., masquerade n.

A cannonade is:

a. A continued discharge of cannon,...

There might have been a lurking pun in "communicade": "communicaid",
based on the idea that communicade agencies "aid" their clients to
communicate with the public.

LinkedIn has an entry for
https://www.linkedin.com/company/communicade-consulting-ltd

Communicade Consulting Ltd is a Marketing and Advertising company
located in 24309 U St, Ocean Park, Washington, United States.

There was, in the UK,
https://beta.companieshouse.gov.uk/company/07188114

COMMUNICADE LIMITED

In New Zealand there was short-lived magazine named Communicade.
http://www.upthepunks.co.nz/wiki/index.php?title=Communicade

Communicade

Produced by members of the Hutt Valley punk band Compos Mentis,
Communicade lasted only three issues from 1985 before tensions
within the band led both the zine and the group to split in 1986.
Featuring contributions from Craig, David, Grant, Heather and Simon,
Communicade covered the New Zealand underground punk scene as well
as printing reports, interviews and articles on Australia, the UK,
Italy and the USA from an anarcho-punk perspective.

<endquote>

The suffix "ade" in fruit drinks is different.

Forming nouns denoting drinks made from the fruit, etc., denoted by
the first element, as orangeade n., gingerade n., cherryade n.
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Jack
2019-08-14 02:10:06 UTC
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Post by e***@gmail.com
I use it regularly, but was surprised when it wouldn't properly spellcheck just now. So, led to this discussion as I tried to confirm.
You could make it one, after the pattern of palisade, cavalcade,
cannonade. motorcade. It would mean a succession of related
c
c***@gmail.com
2020-01-13 02:21:11 UTC
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Post by MWBradburne
I keep typing "communicade" in my missives, but the telltale red squiggle
chastises me for seemingly inadvertently making up the (Am) English word.
I was *sure* I had seen the word used so many times that it comes naturally
to the tips of my fingers as I type.
A quick google for "is communicade a word or not?", nets zilch.
https://duckduckgo.com/html?q=is+communicade+a+word+or+not%3F
Given that discrepancy between what *I* seem to inherently have stored in
my mental memory against the lack of any decent search hits, I must ask
you, the esteemed Gentlemen of English, whether it's *your* experience
that "communicade" is used as a term for "communication by text".
Have you seen "communicade" used as an (Am) English word?
I always believed 'Communicade' was a word, as in "We just telegraphed a communicade to headquarters." But dang, I guess its not a word. Swear, I seen/heard actors say that in film.
Tony Cooper
2020-01-13 02:37:20 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by c***@gmail.com
Post by MWBradburne
I keep typing "communicade" in my missives, but the telltale red squiggle
chastises me for seemingly inadvertently making up the (Am) English word.
I was *sure* I had seen the word used so many times that it comes naturally
to the tips of my fingers as I type.
A quick google for "is communicade a word or not?", nets zilch.
https://duckduckgo.com/html?q=is+communicade+a+word+or+not%3F
Given that discrepancy between what *I* seem to inherently have stored in
my mental memory against the lack of any decent search hits, I must ask
you, the esteemed Gentlemen of English, whether it's *your* experience
that "communicade" is used as a term for "communication by text".
Have you seen "communicade" used as an (Am) English word?
I always believed 'Communicade' was a word, as in "We just telegraphed a communicade to headquarters." But dang, I guess its not a word. Swear, I seen/heard actors say that in film.
That would be a communiqué: an official bulletin or communication
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Jerry Friedman
2020-01-13 03:16:01 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by c***@gmail.com
Post by MWBradburne
I keep typing "communicade" in my missives, but the telltale red squiggle
chastises me for seemingly inadvertently making up the (Am) English word.
I was *sure* I had seen the word used so many times that it comes naturally
to the tips of my fingers as I type.
A quick google for "is communicade a word or not?", nets zilch.
https://duckduckgo.com/html?q=is+communicade+a+word+or+not%3F
Given that discrepancy between what *I* seem to inherently have stored in
my mental memory against the lack of any decent search hits, I must ask
you, the esteemed Gentlemen of English, whether it's *your* experience
that "communicade" is used as a term for "communication by text".
Have you seen "communicade" used as an (Am) English word?
I always believed 'Communicade' was a word, as in "We just telegraphed a communicade to headquarters." But dang, I guess its not a word. Swear, I seen/heard actors say that in film.
Just in case you see this, the word you heard was probably "communiqué".
--
Jerry Friedman
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