Discussion:
What grammar video tutorial ?
(too old to reply)
Pat
2018-05-02 04:51:04 UTC
Permalink
I am looking for a completeVIDEO tutorial of English grammar,
from beginning to advanced levels. Very easy to use, only
practical topics.
I would prefer a whole course to download from the Internet
for free.
I need it for my private, individual use only.

Could anyone of you inform me about anything like this?
I would be very grateful.

Regards
Pat
Peter Moylan
2018-05-02 06:07:38 UTC
Permalink
I am looking for a completeVIDEO tutorial of English grammar, from
beginning to advanced levels. Very easy to use, only practical
topics. I would prefer a whole course to download from the Internet
for free. I need it for my private, individual use only.
Could anyone of you inform me about anything like this? I would be
very grateful.
From beginning to advanced levels? How many petabytes do you have free
on your hard drive?
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Pat
2018-05-02 06:24:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
I am looking for a completeVIDEO tutorial of English grammar, from
beginning to advanced levels. Very easy to use, only practical
topics. I would prefer a whole course to download from the Internet
for free. I need it for my private, individual use only.
Could anyone of you inform me about anything like this? I would be
very grateful.
From beginning to advanced levels? How many petabytes do you have free
on your hard drive?
I wrote : "only practical topics". I mean only topics regarding everyday
conversation, without deep scientific explanation.

If you know about such a course from beginning to intermediate level
and let me know where to find it, I'll be happy too.

I think I know basics of English grammar but I'd like to repeat it
from beginning to be sure that I did not miss any important topic.
Important from every day speaking point of view.

Regards
Pat
Whiskers
1970-01-01 00:00:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by Pat
Post by Peter Moylan
I am looking for a completeVIDEO tutorial of English grammar, from
beginning to advanced levels. Very easy to use, only practical
topics. I would prefer a whole course to download from the Internet
for free. I need it for my private, individual use only.
Could anyone of you inform me about anything like this? I would be
very grateful.
From beginning to advanced levels? How many petabytes do you have free
on your hard drive?
I wrote : "only practical topics". I mean only topics regarding everyday
conversation, without deep scientific explanation.
If you know about such a course from beginning to intermediate level
and let me know where to find it, I'll be happy too.
I think I know basics of English grammar but I'd like to repeat it
from beginning to be sure that I did not miss any important topic.
Important from every day speaking point of view.
Regards
Pat
<http://www.bbc.co.uk/learning/subjects/english.shtml>
<http://learnenglish.britishcouncil.org/en>
--
^^^^^^^^^^
Whiskers
~~~~~~~~~~


----Android NewsGroup Reader----
http://usenet.sinaapp.com/
Colonel Edmund J. Burke
2018-05-02 15:50:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by Pat
I am looking for a completeVIDEO tutorial of English grammar,
from beginning to advanced levels. Very easy to use, only
practical topics.
I would prefer a whole course to download from the Internet
for free.
I need it for my private, individual use only.
Could anyone of you inform me about anything like this?
I would be very grateful.
Regards
Pat
Pat?
Man or woman....or what?
Pat
2018-05-02 16:04:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by Colonel Edmund J. Burke
Post by Pat
I am looking for a completeVIDEO tutorial of English grammar,
from beginning to advanced levels. Very easy to use, only
practical topics.
I would prefer a whole course to download from the Internet
for free.
I need it for my private, individual use only.
Could anyone of you inform me about anything like this?
I would be very grateful.
Regards
Pat
Pat?
Man or woman....or what?
Is that important to you?
Just for your information - a woman, however it was tempting
to answer "what". :-)

Regards
Pat
Colonel Edmund J. Burke
2018-05-02 17:42:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by Pat
Post by Colonel Edmund J. Burke
Post by Pat
I am looking for a completeVIDEO tutorial of English grammar,
from beginning to advanced levels. Very easy to use, only
practical topics.
I would prefer a whole course to download from the Internet
for free.
I need it for my private, individual use only.
Could anyone of you inform me about anything like this?
I would be very grateful.
Regards
Pat
Pat?
Man or woman....or what?
Is that important to you?
Just for your information - a woman, however it was tempting
to answer "what". :-)
Regards
Pat
I just like to know who is who, Pat.
You needn't become hostile and cantankerous with this old warburd.
Pat
2018-05-02 18:10:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by Colonel Edmund J. Burke
Post by Pat
Post by Colonel Edmund J. Burke
Post by Pat
I am looking for a completeVIDEO tutorial of English grammar,
from beginning to advanced levels. Very easy to use, only
practical topics.
I would prefer a whole course to download from the Internet
for free.
I need it for my private, individual use only.
Could anyone of you inform me about anything like this?
I would be very grateful.
Regards
Pat
Pat?
Man or woman....or what?
Is that important to you?
Just for your information - a woman, however it was tempting
to answer "what". :-)
Regards
Pat
I just like to know who is who, Pat.
You needn't become hostile and cantankerous with this old warburd.
What else?
Have you ever heard about emoticon like ":-)" ?

Pat
Colonel Edmund J. Burke
2018-05-02 20:06:51 UTC
Permalink
Post by Pat
Post by Colonel Edmund J. Burke
Post by Pat
Post by Colonel Edmund J. Burke
Post by Pat
I am looking for a completeVIDEO tutorial of English grammar,
from beginning to advanced levels. Very easy to use, only
practical topics.
I would prefer a whole course to download from the Internet
for free.
I need it for my private, individual use only.
Could anyone of you inform me about anything like this?
I would be very grateful.
Regards
Pat
Pat?
Man or woman....or what?
Is that important to you?
Just for your information - a woman, however it was tempting
to answer "what". :-)
Regards
Pat
I just like to know who is who, Pat.
You needn't become hostile and cantankerous with this old warburd.
What else?
Have you ever heard about emoticon like ":-)" ?
Pat
Yes, the happy face.
Colonel Edmund J. Burke
2018-05-02 20:18:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by Colonel Edmund J. Burke
Post by Pat
Post by Colonel Edmund J. Burke
Post by Pat
Post by Colonel Edmund J. Burke
Post by Pat
I am looking for a completeVIDEO tutorial of English grammar,
from beginning to advanced levels. Very easy to use, only
practical topics.
I would prefer a whole course to download from the Internet
for free.
I need it for my private, individual use only.
Could anyone of you inform me about anything like this?
I would be very grateful.
Regards
Pat
Pat?
Man or woman....or what?
Is that important to you?
Just for your information - a woman, however it was tempting
to answer "what". :-)
Regards
Pat
I just like to know who is who, Pat.
You needn't become hostile and cantankerous with this old warburd.
What else?
Have you ever heard about emoticon like ":-)" ?
Pat
Yes, the happy face.
By the way, Pat. The quotation marks are unnecessary.
Pat
2018-05-04 09:14:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by Colonel Edmund J. Burke
Post by Pat
Have you ever heard about emoticon like ":-)" ?
By the way, Pat. The quotation marks are unnecessary.
Well, if I had a tutorial of grammar, I would not make such mistakes.

Regards
Pat
jew pedophile Ron Jacobson (jew pedophile Baruch 'Barry' Shein's jew aliash)
2018-05-04 13:43:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by Pat
Post by Colonel Edmund J. Burke
Post by Pat
Have you ever heard about emoticon like ":-)" ?
By the way, Pat. The quotation marks are unnecessary.
Well, if I had a tutorial of grammar, I would not make such mistakes.
Regards
Pat
You don't need a tutorial with KKKoloon the illiterate moulignan here!

- -

" I don't even have the heart to tell him I've never infested
Arizona."
- Klaun Shittinb'ricks (1940 - ), acknowledging that he lied
from the very beginning, A jew scam, as expected

" My real name's McGill. The jew thing I just do for the homeboys.
They all want a pipe hitting member of the tribe, so to speak."
- Saul Goodman (Bob Odenkirk). "Better Call Saul" (2015)

"Die Juden sind unser Unglück!"
- Heinrich von Treitschke (1834 - 1896)

"But vhere vill ve be able to vatch gay jews taking black cock up ze
ass?"
- Klaun Shittinb'ricks (1940 - ), bemoaning the depletion of jews
in Hollyvood and the effect on his viewing preferences
Message-ID: <***@4ax.com>
David
2018-05-04 15:42:03 UTC
Permalink
war


"jew pedophile Ron Jacobson (jew pedophile Baruch 'Barry' Shein's jew
Post by Pat
U¿ytkownik "fake vet Scatboi Colon La Edmund J. Burke"
Post by Pat
Have you ever heard about emoticon like ":-)" ?
By the way, Pat. The quotation marks are unnecessary.
Well, if I had a tutorial of grammar, I would not make such mistakes.
Regards
Pat
You don't need a tutorial with KKKoloon the illiterate moulignan here!

- -

" I don't even have the heart to tell him I've never infested
Arizona."
- Klaun Shittinb'ricks (1940 - ), acknowledging that he lied
from the very beginning, A jew scam, as expected

" My real name's McGill. The jew thing I just do for the homeboys.
They all want a pipe hitting member of the tribe, so to speak."
- Saul Goodman (Bob Odenkirk). "Better Call Saul" (2015)

"Die Juden sind unser Unglück!"
- Heinrich von Treitschke (1834 - 1896)

"But vhere vill ve be able to vatch gay jews taking black cock up ze
ass?"
- Klaun Shittinb'ricks (1940 - ), bemoaning the depletion of jews
in Hollyvood and the effect on his viewing preferences
Message-ID: <***@4ax.com>
Colonel Edmund J. Burke
2018-05-04 17:26:43 UTC
Permalink
war
Irrelevant!
David
2018-05-04 17:41:57 UTC
Permalink
war
Irrelevant!

it’s a vent, I ventalize when that happens.
Peeler
2018-05-04 17:21:30 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 04 May 2018 06:43:31 -0700, serbian bitch Razovic, the resident
psychopath of sci and scj and Usenet's famous sexual cripple, making an ass
of herself as "jew pedophile Ron Jacobson (jew pedophile Baruch 'Barry'
Post by jew pedophile Ron Jacobson (jew pedophile Baruch 'Barry' Shein's jew aliash)
Post by Pat
Post by Colonel Edmund J. Burke
By the way, Pat. The quotation marks are unnecessary.
Well, if I had a tutorial of grammar, I would not make such mistakes.
Regards
Pat
You don't need a tutorial with KKKoloon the illiterate moulignan here!
She certainly would need it to understand your serbian
Pidgin-English-Retardese, Razovic!
--
serb bitch Razovic, our resident psychopath and "WASP" wannabe correcting
British posters' CORRECT English over at uk.rec.cars.maintenance:
"There's no such word as 'impending'. Something is either imminent or
pending but not 'impending'."
MID: <***@4ax.com>
David
2018-05-04 17:24:28 UTC
Permalink
"Peeler" wrote in message news:zE0HC.83483$***@fx43.am4...

On Fri, 04 May 2018 06:43:31 -0700, serbian bitch Razovic, the resident
psychopath of sci and scj and Usenet's famous sexual cripple, making an ass
of herself as "jew pedophile Ron Jacobson (jew pedophile Baruch 'Barry'
Post by jew pedophile Ron Jacobson (jew pedophile Baruch 'Barry' Shein's jew aliash)
Post by Pat
Post by Colonel Edmund J. Burke
By the way, Pat. The quotation marks are unnecessary.
Well, if I had a tutorial of grammar, I would not make such mistakes.
Regards
Pat
You don't need a tutorial with KKKoloon the illiterate moulignan here!
She certainly would need it to understand your serbian
Pidgin-English-Retardese, Razovic!
--
serb bitch Razovic, our resident psychopath and "WASP" wannabe correcting
British posters' CORRECT English over at uk.rec.cars.maintenance:
"There's no such word as 'impending'. Something is either imminent or
pending but not 'impending'."
MID: <***@4ax.com>

where is the noun?
Colonel Edmund J. Burke
2018-05-04 17:26:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by jew pedophile Ron Jacobson (jew pedophile Baruch 'Barry' Shein's jew aliash)
Post by Pat
Post by Colonel Edmund J. Burke
Post by Pat
Have you ever heard about emoticon like ":-)" ?
By the way, Pat. The quotation marks are unnecessary.
Well, if I had a tutorial of grammar, I would not make such mistakes.
Regards
Pat
Suddenly, in pops Miss Recktum, green (once again) with envy...
Post by jew pedophile Ron Jacobson (jew pedophile Baruch 'Barry' Shein's jew aliash)
You don't need a tutorial with KKKoloon the illiterate moulignan here!
jew pedophile Ron Jacobson (jew pedophile Baruch 'Barry' Shein's jew aliash)
2018-05-04 17:52:23 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 4 May 2018 10:26:15 -0700, "fake vet Scatboi Colon La Edmund
Post by Colonel Edmund J. Burke
Post by jew pedophile Ron Jacobson (jew pedophile Baruch 'Barry' Shein's jew aliash)
Post by Pat
Post by Colonel Edmund J. Burke
Post by Pat
Have you ever heard about emoticon like ":-)" ?
By the way, Pat. The quotation marks are unnecessary.
Well, if I had a tutorial of grammar, I would not make such mistakes.
Regards
Pat
Suddenly, in pops Miss Recktum, green (once again) with envy...
Post by jew pedophile Ron Jacobson (jew pedophile Baruch 'Barry' Shein's jew aliash)
You don't need a tutorial with KKKoloon the illiterate moulignan here!
And there in turn, pops in KKKoloon, black (once again) with moulery!

- -

" I don't even have the heart to tell him I've never infested
Arizona."
- Klaun Shittinb'ricks (1940 - ), acknowledging that he lied
from the very beginning, A jew scam, as expected

" My real name's McGill. The jew thing I just do for the homeboys.
They all want a pipe hitting member of the tribe, so to speak."
- Saul Goodman (Bob Odenkirk). "Better Call Saul" (2015)

"Die Juden sind unser Unglück!"
- Heinrich von Treitschke (1834 - 1896)

"But vhere vill ve be able to vatch gay jews taking black cock up ze
ass?"
- Klaun Shittinb'ricks (1940 - ), bemoaning the depletion of jews
in Hollyvood and the effect on his viewing preferences
Message-ID: <***@4ax.com>
Peeler
2018-05-04 19:25:31 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 04 May 2018 10:52:23 -0700, serbian bitch Razovic, the resident
psychopath of sci and scj and Usenet's famous sexual cripple, making an ass
of herself as "jew pedophile Ron Jacobson (jew pedophile Baruch 'Barry'
Post by jew pedophile Ron Jacobson (jew pedophile Baruch 'Barry' Shein's jew aliash)
Post by Colonel Edmund J. Burke
Suddenly, in pops Miss Recktum, green (once again) with envy...
Post by jew pedophile Ron Jacobson (jew pedophile Baruch 'Barry' Shein's jew aliash)
You don't need a tutorial with KKKoloon the illiterate moulignan here!
And there in turn, pops in KKKoloon, black (once again) with moulery!
BTW, serb peasant: peddled any used satellite dishes on Usenet lately? LOL
--
serb peasant Razovic trying to peddle used satellite dishes on Usenet LOL:
"If you are in London or nearby, please e-mail me (***@callnetuk.com) - I
may have one available."
Colonel Edmund J. Burke
2018-05-05 14:14:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peeler
On Fri, 04 May 2018 10:52:23 -0700, serbian bitch Razovic, the resident
psychopath of sci and scj and Usenet's famous sexual cripple, making an ass
of herself as "jew pedophile Ron Jacobson (jew pedophile Baruch 'Barry'
Post by jew pedophile Ron Jacobson (jew pedophile Baruch 'Barry' Shein's jew aliash)
Post by Colonel Edmund J. Burke
Suddenly, in pops Miss Recktum, green (once again) with envy...
Post by jew pedophile Ron Jacobson (jew pedophile Baruch 'Barry' Shein's jew aliash)
You don't need a tutorial with KKKoloon the illiterate moulignan here!
And there in turn, pops in KKKoloon, black (once again) with moulery!
BTW, serb peasant: peddled any used satellite dishes on Usenet lately? LOL
Hahahaha! Your girl charms wearing off on the Navy, Miss Recktum?
Trying hard to earn an honest dollar?
LOL
Colonel Edmund J. Burke
2018-05-05 14:18:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by jew pedophile Ron Jacobson (jew pedophile Baruch 'Barry' Shein's jew aliash)
Post by Pat
Post by Colonel Edmund J. Burke
Post by Pat
Have you ever heard about emoticon like ":-)" ?
By the way, Pat. The quotation marks are unnecessary.
Well, if I had a tutorial of grammar, I would not make such mistakes.
Regards
Pat
You don't need a tutorial with KKKoloon the illiterate moulignan here!
I was once known as The Armchair Grammarian, and I have a tome of grammar right here at Sunset Chateau.
David
2018-05-05 15:57:57 UTC
Permalink
"Colonel Edmund J. Burke" wrote in message news:73jHC.146525$***@fx05.iad...

On 5/4/2018 6:43 AM, jew pedophile Ron Jacobson (jew pedophile Baruch
Post by jew pedophile Ron Jacobson (jew pedophile Baruch 'Barry' Shein's jew aliash)
Post by Pat
U¿ytkownik "fake vet Scatboi Colon La Edmund J. Burke"
Post by Pat
Have you ever heard about emoticon like ":-)" ?
By the way, Pat. The quotation marks are unnecessary.
Well, if I had a tutorial of grammar, I would not make such mistakes.
Regards
Pat
You don't need a tutorial with KKKoloon the illiterate moulignan here!
I was once known as The Armchair Grammarian, and I have a tome of grammar
right here at Sunset Chateau.

I have been doing a couple of things to them.
Anton Shepelev
2018-05-04 11:34:50 UTC
Permalink
I am looking for a complete VIDEO tutorial of En-
glish grammar, from beginning to advanced levels.
Very easy to use, only practical topics. I would
prefer a whole course to download from the Internet
for free. I need it for my private, individual use
only.
Could anyone of you inform me about anything like
this? I would be very grateful.
Videos may be useful for such things as car repair
or guitar lessons, but for grammar they make no
sense. I suggest that you study grammar from good
books. I recommend the following:

1. Grammar of English Grammars by Goold Brown:
https://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/11615

2. An English Grammar by Baskervill and Sewell:
https://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/14006

3. A Manual of English Grammar and Compostion by
J.C. Nesfield
( I can share an electronic copy )

4. Practical English Usage by Michael Swan -- an
oft-recommented modern book, but too primitive
to my taste. I can send you an electronic
copy if it is not against your moral princi-
ples.
--
() ascii ribbon campaign - against html e-mail
/\ http://preview.tinyurl.com/qcy6mjc [archived]
Pat
2018-05-04 12:22:03 UTC
Permalink
Thank you for your answer and advice.
Post by Anton Shepelev
Videos may be useful for such things as car repair
or guitar lessons, but for grammar they make no
sense.
That is not true. I have some videos on grammar items
and they are very useful. However I managed to download
only a few such videos and they do not present a short
but complete information. I was not able to find them more.
Post by Anton Shepelev
I suggest that you study grammar from good
https://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/11615
https://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/14006
Maybe the books are good. I looked at their .html form
only. But they present the attitude that I wanted to avoid.
I do not want to study English grammar.
I want to learn the most important rules as quickly and
simply as possibly and be able to use them in conversation.
It should cover all important topics. Important to understand
what native speaker say and to be understood by native
speakers. I prefer British English however it is no a requirement.
Post by Anton Shepelev
3. A Manual of English Grammar and Compostion by
J.C. Nesfield
( I can share an electronic copy )
Thanks for your offer to share the copy but I am afraid that it
is kind of book like the previous two. If not, please let me know.
Post by Anton Shepelev
4. Practical English Usage by Michael Swan -- an
oft-recommented modern book, but too primitive
to my taste. I can send you an electronic
copy if it is not against your moral principles.
I have the book, it is a new paper edition of it. It is a very good
book but useful only when you are looking for an explanation
for any specific subject. It is not a tutorial nor handbook nor course.

I am still loking for a complete but a concise, short and easy
to use video tutorial.

Regards
Pat
Peter T. Daniels
2018-05-04 12:40:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by Pat
Thank you for your answer and advice.
Post by Anton Shepelev
Videos may be useful for such things as car repair
or guitar lessons, but for grammar they make no
sense.
That is not true. I have some videos on grammar items
and they are very useful. However I managed to download
only a few such videos and they do not present a short
but complete information. I was not able to find them more.
Post by Anton Shepelev
I suggest that you study grammar from good
https://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/11615
https://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/14006
Maybe the books are good. I looked at their .html form
only. But they present the attitude that I wanted to avoid.
I do not want to study English grammar.
I want to learn the most important rules as quickly and
simply as possibly and be able to use them in conversation.
It should cover all important topics. Important to understand
what native speaker say and to be understood by native
speakers. I prefer British English however it is no a requirement.
Post by Anton Shepelev
3. A Manual of English Grammar and Compostion by
J.C. Nesfield
( I can share an electronic copy )
Thanks for your offer to share the copy but I am afraid that it
is kind of book like the previous two. If not, please let me know.
Post by Anton Shepelev
4. Practical English Usage by Michael Swan -- an
oft-recommented modern book, but too primitive
to my taste. I can send you an electronic
copy if it is not against your moral principles.
I have the book, it is a new paper edition of it. It is a very good
book but useful only when you are looking for an explanation
for any specific subject. It is not a tutorial nor handbook nor course.
I am still loking for a complete but a concise, short and easy
to use video tutorial.
If you don't understand that your demands are utterly contradictory, there
is no hope for you.

You cannot have both "short" and "complete."

You cannot have both "video" and "comprehensive."

I've no idea what an "easy to use" video about conversational English
could possibly be.
Pat
2018-05-04 13:09:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Pat
Post by Anton Shepelev
4. Practical English Usage by Michael Swan -- an
oft-recommented modern book, but too primitive
to my taste. I can send you an electronic
copy if it is not against your moral princi-
ples.
DO NOT FOLLOW ANY OF THOSE RECOMMENDATIONS.
UNLESS YOU WANT TO SOUND LIKE YOU LEARNED ENGLISH
IN THE 18TH CENTURY.
I do not agry with you that the above book contains the English
language from the 18th century.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Pat
I am still loking for a complete but a concise, short and easy
to use video tutorial.
You cannot have both "short" and "complete."
It is a matter of definition of the term "complete".
I used the word not to demand everything on English grammar.
By the way, I think that such work does not exist at all, even very,
very long.
I am looking for "complete" grammar in this sense of the word "complete"
that no basic rule is omitted. Of course without details, exceptions, etc.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
You cannot have both "video" and "comprehensive."
I did not use the word "comprehensive". It is your understanding of my
text.

Regards
Pat
Peter T. Daniels
2018-05-04 14:30:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by Pat
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Pat
Post by Anton Shepelev
4. Practical English Usage by Michael Swan -- an
oft-recommented modern book, but too primitive
to my taste. I can send you an electronic
copy if it is not against your moral princi-
ples.
DO NOT FOLLOW ANY OF THOSE RECOMMENDATIONS.
UNLESS YOU WANT TO SOUND LIKE YOU LEARNED ENGLISH
IN THE 18TH CENTURY.
I do not agry with you that the above book contains the English
language from the 18th century.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Pat
I am still loking for a complete but a concise, short and easy
to use video tutorial.
You cannot have both "short" and "complete."
It is a matter of definition of the term "complete".
I used the word not to demand everything on English grammar.
By the way, I think that such work does not exist at all, even very,
very long.
There are two candidates: Quirk et al., A Comprehensive Grammar of the
English Language (1985), and Huddleston, Pullum, et al., The Cambridge
Grammar of the English Language (2002). Both are immense and authoritative.
Post by Pat
I am looking for "complete" grammar in this sense of the word "complete"
that no basic rule is omitted. Of course without details, exceptions, etc.
The faulty presupposition is that there are such things as "rules" to be
memorized.
Post by Pat
Post by Peter T. Daniels
You cannot have both "video" and "comprehensive."
I did not use the word "comprehensive". It is your understanding of my
text.
Pat
2018-05-04 15:10:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
There are two candidates: Quirk et al., A Comprehensive Grammar of the
English Language (1985), and Huddleston, Pullum, et al., The Cambridge
Grammar of the English Language (2002). Both are immense and authoritative.
Thanks but, as I said, I do not want to study English grammar,
esspecially from immense sources.
I just want to learn it to be able to communicate efficiently.

Regards
Pat
Pat
2018-05-04 15:17:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by Pat
Post by Peter T. Daniels
There are two candidates: Quirk et al., A Comprehensive Grammar of the
English Language (1985), and Huddleston, Pullum, et al., The Cambridge
Grammar of the English Language (2002). Both are immense and authoritative.
Thanks but, as I said, I do not want to study English grammar,
esspecially from immense sources.
I just want to learn it to be able to communicate efficiently.
Sorry, it was misunderstanding. I thought it was your answer to my later
news.

Regards
Pat
Peter T. Daniels
2018-05-04 15:31:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by Pat
Post by Peter T. Daniels
There are two candidates: Quirk et al., A Comprehensive Grammar of the
English Language (1985), and Huddleston, Pullum, et al., The Cambridge
Grammar of the English Language (2002). Both are immense and authoritative.
Thanks but, as I said, I do not want to study English grammar,
esspecially from immense sources.
I just want to learn it to be able to communicate efficiently.
I was answering your assertion. The one you deleted.

Incidentally, your communication here is perfectly efficient.
Pat
2018-05-04 15:40:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Pat
I just want to learn it to be able to communicate efficiently.
I was answering your assertion. The one you deleted.
Yes, I know. Now.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Incidentally, your communication here is perfectly efficient.
Thanks, but it is easier when I have time to think
and check in a lot of books around me.

Regards
Pat
Janet
2018-05-04 16:30:46 UTC
Permalink
In article <5aec77ce$0$618$***@news.neostrada.pl>, ***@stop.com
says...
Post by Pat
Post by Peter T. Daniels
There are two candidates: Quirk et al., A Comprehensive Grammar of the
English Language (1985), and Huddleston, Pullum, et al., The Cambridge
Grammar of the English Language (2002). Both are immense and authoritative.
Thanks but, as I said, I do not want to study English grammar,
esspecially from immense sources.
I just want to learn it to be able to communicate efficiently.
It appears from your posts that you already know enough English and
enough grammar to communicate efficiently.

Janet.

---
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
http://www.avg.com
Pat
2018-05-04 16:44:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by Janet
Post by Pat
I just want to learn it to be able to communicate efficiently.
It appears from your posts that you already know enough English and
enough grammar to communicate efficiently.
Thank you, but it is only in writing. My speaking is very pour
and it is not a problem with my pronunciation (I think it is not
very bad) and not because I am shy. It is problem that I do
not trust myself, my grammar mainly. I have a lot of doubts
and I think about the doubts while I speak.
I have to learn the rules and use them without any hasitating.

Regards
Pat
Cheryl
2018-05-04 18:49:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by Pat
Post by Pat
I just want to learn it to be able to communicate efficiently.
  It appears from your posts that you already know enough English and
enough grammar to communicate efficiently.
Thank you, but it is only in writing. My speaking is very pour
and it is not a problem with my pronunciation (I think it is not
very bad) and not because I am shy. It is problem that I do
not trust myself, my grammar mainly. I have a lot of doubts
and I think about the doubts while I speak.
I have to learn the rules and use them without any hasitating.
I think the best way to improve speaking skills is to speak, not to
study grammar rules. Ideally, this means live conversations with a
native speaker, but holding conversations with people who are fluent in
English as a second language will also help. In many parts of the world,
there are courses or clubs or conversation groups to help people with
exactly that skill in a language that isn't spoken locally.
--
Cheryl
Tony Cooper
2018-05-04 16:34:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by Pat
Post by Peter T. Daniels
There are two candidates: Quirk et al., A Comprehensive Grammar of the
English Language (1985), and Huddleston, Pullum, et al., The Cambridge
Grammar of the English Language (2002). Both are immense and authoritative.
Thanks but, as I said, I do not want to study English grammar,
esspecially from immense sources.
I just want to learn it to be able to communicate efficiently.
Just to help you on your way to your goal, you might want to look up
"immense". Writing about an "immense source" suggests a source that
is very large in physical size. You could say a book is "immense",
but what you probably mean is "extensive". "Extensive" describes what
is covered in the book.

Definitions can be tricky because there are both definitions and
connotations to a word.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Pat
2018-05-04 18:06:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Pat
Thanks but, as I said, I do not want to study English grammar,
esspecially from immense sources.
I just want to learn it to be able to communicate efficiently.
Just to help you on your way to your goal, you might want to look up
"immense". Writing about an "immense source" suggests a source that
is very large in physical size. You could say a book is "immense",
but what you probably mean is "extensive". "Extensive" describes what
is covered in the book.
Definitions can be tricky because there are both definitions and
connotations to a word.
Thank you very much. I realise that word combination is also one
of my problems.

Regards
Pat
Whiskers
1970-01-01 00:00:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by Pat
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Pat
Thanks but, as I said, I do not want to study English grammar,
esspecially from immense sources.
I just want to learn it to be able to communicate efficiently.
Just to help you on your way to your goal, you might want to look up
"immense". Writing about an "immense source" suggests a source that
is very large in physical size. You could say a book is "immense",
but what you probably mean is "extensive". "Extensive" describes what
is covered in the book.
Definitions can be tricky because there are both definitions and
connotations to a word.
Thank you very much. I realise that word combination is also one
of my problems.
Regards
Pat
I think it may worry you a lot more than it does native or fluent
speakers you might find yourself talking with. You are unlikely
to cause offence, if your use of an unusual or inappropriate
expression is most likely to be due to unfamiliarity with the
language.
--
^^^^^^^^^^
Whiskers
~~~~~~~~~~


----Android NewsGroup Reader----
http://usenet.sinaapp.com/
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2018-05-05 18:10:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by Whiskers
Post by Pat
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Pat
Thanks but, as I said, I do not want to study English grammar,
esspecially from immense sources.
I just want to learn it to be able to communicate efficiently.
Just to help you on your way to your goal, you might want to look up
"immense". Writing about an "immense source" suggests a source that
is very large in physical size. You could say a book is "immense",
but what you probably mean is "extensive". "Extensive" describes what
is covered in the book.
Definitions can be tricky because there are both definitions and
connotations to a word.
Thank you very much. I realise that word combination is also one
of my problems.
Regards
Pat
I think it may worry you a lot more than it does native or fluent
speakers you might find yourself talking with. You are unlikely
to cause offence, if your use of an unusual or inappropriate
expression is most likely to be due to unfamiliarity with the
language.
I have found, both in French-speaking and in Spanish-speaking
countries, that foreigners are normally forgiven for faux pas that in
natives would be considered offensive.
--
athel
Pat
2018-05-04 13:14:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
I've no idea what an "easy to use" video about conversational English
could possibly be.
Of you know about any tutorial on English grammar not in a form
of set of videos, please let me know.

Regards
Pat
Colonel Edmund J. Burke
2018-05-04 15:12:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by Pat
Thank you for your answer and advice.
Videos  may  be useful for such things as car repair
or guitar lessons, but  for  grammar  they  make  no
sense.
That is not true. I have some videos on grammar items
and they are very useful. However I managed to download
only a few such videos and they do not present a short
but complete information. I was not able to find them more.
I  suggest that you study grammar from good
     https://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/11615
     https://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/14006
Maybe the books are good. I looked at their .html form
only. But they present the attitude that I wanted to avoid.
I do not want to study English grammar.
I want to learn the most important rules as quickly and
simply as possibly and be able to use them in conversation.
It should cover all important topics. Important to understand
what native speaker say and to be understood by native
speakers. I prefer British English however it is no a requirement.
 3.  A Manual of English Grammar and Compostion  by
     J.C. Nesfield
     ( I can share an electronic copy )
Thanks for your offer to share the copy but I am afraid that it
is kind of book like the previous two. If not, please let me know.
 4.  Practical  English Usage by Michael Swan -- an
     oft-recommented modern book, but too primitive
     to  my  taste.   I  can send you an electronic
     copy if it is not against your  moral  principles.
I have the book, it is a new paper edition of it. It is a very good
book but useful only when you are looking for an explanation
for any specific subject. It is not a tutorial nor handbook nor course.
I am still loking for a complete but a concise, short and easy
to use video tutorial.
Regards
Pat
These days, Pat, folks tend not to listen, which shows why Anton Sheepdip....well, you know the rest.
Patok
2018-05-04 20:18:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by Colonel Edmund J. Burke
These days, Pat, folks tend not to listen, which shows why Anton
Sheepdip....well, you know the rest.
Why are you still in this froup, kernel? Off to your pit! I banish you. Fie!
--
"Питат ли ме дей зората - шат на патката главата."
Colonel Edmund J. Burke
2018-05-11 16:05:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by Patok
Post by Colonel Edmund J. Burke
These days, Pat, folks tend not to listen, which shows why Anton Sheepdip....well, you know the rest.
Why are you still in this froup, kernel? Off to your pit! I banish you. Fie!
Fie? That must be old English, right??

Anton Shepelev
2018-05-05 11:52:40 UTC
Permalink
Videos may be useful for such things as car re-
pair or guitar lessons, but for grammar they
make no sense.
That is not true. I have some videos on grammar
items and they are very useful. However I managed
to download only a few such videos and they do not
present a short but complete information. I was
not able to find them more.
What are the advantages of such videos over written
articles? The disadvantages are enforced tempo,
poor navigation, and tiny scope. Every word that I
read has a full page of context immeately available,
whereas every word that I hear comes in isolation
from what precedes and what follows.

Do you have problems downloading videos that you
like? Virtually any video that you see on the web
can be ripped with proper software.
https://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/11615
https://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/14006
Maybe the books are good. I looked at their .html
form only.
For reading on the PC, it is the best of the formats
offered by Gutenberg.
But they present the attitude that I wanted to
avoid. I do not want to study English grammar. I
want to learn the most important rules as quickly
and simply as possibly ->
as possible.
-> and be able to use them in conversation.
All aspects of English grammar are essential, so I
do not think you can safely omit any one of them.
You can, however, try learning English naturally, as
little children do their native language. But being
neither a child nor a native speaker, you are not
likely to succeed unless you live in an English-
speaking country.
3. A Manual of English Grammar and Compostion
by J.C. Nesfield
( I can share an electronic copy )
Thanks for your offer to share the copy but I am
afraid that it is kind of book like the previous
two. If not, please let me know.
The previous two are as dissimilar as can be:
Baskervill and Sewell's grammar is much smaller and
simpler than Goold Brown's magnum opus and is in-
tended to be accessible to learners:

Of making many English grammars there is no end;
nor should there be till theoretical scholarship
and actual practice are more happily wedded. In
this field much valuable work has already been
accomplished; but it has been done largely by
workers accustomed to take the scholar's point of
view, and their writings are addressed rather to
trained minds than to immature learners. To find
an advanced grammar unencumbered with hard words,
abstruse thoughts, and difficult principles, is
not altogether an easy matter. These things
enhance the difficulty which an ordinary youth
experiences in grasping and assimilating the
facts of grammar, and create a distaste for the
study. It is therefore the leading object of
this book to be both as scholarly and as practi-
cal as possible. In it there is an attempt to
present grammatical facts as simply, and to lead
the student to assimilate them as thoroughly, as
possible, and at the same time to do away with
confusing difficulties as far as may be.

As to Nesfield, his grammar is more like that of B&S
than of Goold Brown.
I am still loking for a complete but a concise,
short and easy to use video tutorial.
I cannot help you with that because your require-
ments are contradictory. You want to climb a fir
tree and not scratch yourself.
--
() ascii ribbon campaign -- against html e-mail
/\ http://preview.tinyurl.com/qcy6mjc [archived]
Colonel Edmund J. Burke
2018-05-05 14:20:47 UTC
Permalink
[slap]

Is this where the argument begins?
May I cut in?
Pat
2018-05-05 14:48:05 UTC
Permalink
Uzytkownik "Anton Shepelev" <***@gmail.com> napisal w wiadomosci news:***@gmail.com...
[...]

Thank you for your long and detailed answer.
I have to think it over.

Regards
Pat
Anton Shepelev
2018-05-07 16:04:17 UTC
Permalink
Thank you for your long and detailed answer. I
have to think it over.
Here's what I found for you on the dusty shelves of
my electronic library:

https://freeshell.de/~antonius/file_host/Gucker-EssentialEnglishGrammar.pdf
[ this link will no last long ]

"All the grammar really needed for speech and com-
prehension, without trivia or archaic material,
clearly presented with may shortcuts, time-
savers[...] the most efficient system for adults
with limited learning time."

Good luck on whichever road you take.
--
() ascii ribbon campaign - against html e-mail
/\ http://preview.tinyurl.com/qcy6mjc [archived]
Pat
2018-05-07 17:07:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by Anton Shepelev
Here's what I found for you on the dusty shelves of
https://freeshell.de/~antonius/file_host/Gucker-EssentialEnglishGrammar.pdf
[ this link will no last long ]
Thank you very much. That's very kind of you.
I downloaded it at once. Philip Gucker's words
at the beginning are very promising.
Post by Anton Shepelev
Good luck on whichever road you take.
Thanks.

Regards
Pat
Peter T. Daniels
2018-05-07 19:08:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by Pat
Post by Anton Shepelev
Here's what I found for you on the dusty shelves of
https://freeshell.de/~antonius/file_host/Gucker-EssentialEnglishGrammar.pdf
[ this link will no last long ]
Thank you very much. That's very kind of you.
I downloaded it at once. Philip Gucker's words
at the beginning are very promising.
However, it's a book for English-speakers who need to know the basic terminology
so that they can pass a junior high school or high school exam. And it's
resolutely mired in the past. No one who has seriously investigated the English
language believes any more that there are exactly four kinds of sentences --
declarative interrogative imperative exclamatory -- or that every sentence must
have a subject and a predicate (just a couple of gems from the first few pages).
The sort of thing decried by David Crystal in his new book *Making Sense: The
Glamourous Story of English Grammar*. At best, it might provide guidance for
writing school essays, but not for conversational English.

For that matter, Crystal's book might be just right for you. He introduced
grammatical terminology in three ways: by recounting how his daughter acquired
each feature during her first four years or so; by giving a brief history of
the use of the word by English grammarians; and by exemplifying it in modern
examples.
Pat
2018-05-07 20:04:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Anton Shepelev
Here's what I found for you on the dusty shelves of
https://freeshell.de/~antonius/file_host/Gucker-EssentialEnglishGrammar.pdf
However, it's a book for English-speakers who need to know the basic
terminology so that they can pass a junior high school or high school
exam.
[...]
I see that you have read a lot of books on English language.
So could you write what book would be the best for me to learn
English, please?

Regards
Pat
Peter T. Daniels
2018-05-07 20:12:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by Pat
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Anton Shepelev
Here's what I found for you on the dusty shelves of
https://freeshell.de/~antonius/file_host/Gucker-EssentialEnglishGrammar.pdf
However, it's a book for English-speakers who need to know the basic
terminology so that they can pass a junior high school or high school
exam.
[...]
I see that you have read a lot of books on English language.
So could you write what book would be the best for me to learn
English, please?
As I said before, you have no need to "learn English." Your English is
excellent. Little or nothing in your messages suggests you have a problem
with English.

But apparently you didn't read to the bottom of my message, which included
a recommendation.
Pat
2018-05-07 20:43:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
As I said before, you have no need to "learn English." Your English is
excellent. Little or nothing in your messages suggests you have a problem
with English.
So why I do not understand native speakers and native speakers
do not understand me? And it is not a problem with my pronunciation,
at least not only.
Besides, telling the truth I have also problems with understanding written
English, including posts in this thread.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
But apparently you didn't read to the bottom of my message,
which included a recommendation.
You wrote: "At best, it might provide guidance for writing school essays,
but not for conversational English. "
Was it about the book by David Crystal *Making Sense: The Glamourous
Story of English Grammar* or about the book by Philip Gucker?

Regards
Pat
Peter T. Daniels
2018-05-07 20:51:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by Pat
Post by Peter T. Daniels
As I said before, you have no need to "learn English." Your English is
excellent. Little or nothing in your messages suggests you have a problem
with English.
So why I do not understand native speakers and native speakers
do not understand me? And it is not a problem with my pronunciation,
at least not only.
Besides, telling the truth I have also problems with understanding written
English, including posts in this thread.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
But apparently you didn't read to the bottom of my message,
which included a recommendation.
You wrote: "At best, it might provide guidance for writing school essays,
but not for conversational English. "
Was it about the book by David Crystal *Making Sense: The Glamourous
Story of English Grammar* or about the book by Philip Gucker?
That's not a problem with understanding English, but a problem with following
a discussion. Given the opinions expressed in the previous paragraph, which
do you think it was?
Pat
2018-05-07 21:59:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
That's not a problem with understanding English, but a problem
with following a discussion. Given the opinions expressed
in the previous paragraph, which do you think it was?
It is my fault. Opening this thread I thought that it was a group
for people who learn English but appearantly it is not.

I would like to thank all of you for your posts.

EOT

Regards
Pat
CDB
2018-05-08 12:28:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
As I said before, you have no need to "learn English." Your English
is excellent. Little or nothing in your messages suggests you have
a problem with English.
So why I do not understand native speakers and native speakers do
not understand me? And it is not a problem with my pronunciation, at
least not only. Besides, telling the truth I have also problems with
understanding written English, including posts in this thread.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
But apparently you didn't read to the bottom of my message, which
included a recommendation.
You wrote: "At best, it might provide guidance for writing school
essays, but not for conversational English. " Was it about the book
by David Crystal *Making Sense: The Glamourous Story of English
Grammar* or about the book by Philip Gucker?
The thing about a rules-based approach to learning a language is that
you have to think about the rules before you say anything, and that
slows you down. As others have said, your written English suggests that
you have learnt all the rules you need for now.

My experience of speaking foreign languages is that the chief need,
after pronouncing your words with reasonable clarity, is for speed.
People hate having to wait while you hem and haw; better to make
mistakes that don't injure comprehension than to drag along.

I suggest that you listen to talk-radio, read what interests you, and
practice speaking whenever you can until you can get the patterns right
without thinking about them first. (I have sometimes talked to myself,
when alone and unobserved. One advantage is that you can repeat
variations until you get it right.)

The language you want to improve in is a help, because English-speakers
are not fussy about correctness. Unlike the French (de la France) and
Germans, they do not resent errors as insults, and most of them will not
correct you unless you ask for it.
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2018-05-09 15:48:57 UTC
Permalink
[ ... ]
The language you want to improve in is a help, because English-speakers
are not fussy about correctness. Unlike the French (de la France) and
Germans, they do not resent errors as insults, and most of them will not
correct you unless you ask for it.
I can't speak for the attitude of the Germans, but my experience is
that the French (de la France) are just like what you say of
English-speakers. I know I make plenty of errors in French, but it's
extremely rare that anyone corrects them, or even shows any sign that
they've noticed.
--
athel
David Kleinecke
2018-05-09 16:28:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
[ ... ]
The language you want to improve in is a help, because English-speakers
are not fussy about correctness. Unlike the French (de la France) and
Germans, they do not resent errors as insults, and most of them will not
correct you unless you ask for it.
I can't speak for the attitude of the Germans, but my experience is
that the French (de la France) are just like what you say of
English-speakers. I know I make plenty of errors in French, but it's
extremely rare that anyone corrects them, or even shows any sign that
they've noticed.
My experience in Mexico is that everybody immediately wants
to speak "English" so the conversation ends up with me speaking
Spanish and them speaking English. But we do manage to communicate.
Peter Moylan
2018-05-09 22:29:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
[ ... ]
The language you want to improve in is a help, because
English-speakers are not fussy about correctness. Unlike the
French (de la France) and Germans, they do not resent errors as
insults, and most of them will not correct you unless you ask for
it.
I can't speak for the attitude of the Germans, but my experience
is that the French (de la France) are just like what you say of
English-speakers. I know I make plenty of errors in French, but
it's extremely rare that anyone corrects them, or even shows any
sign that they've noticed.
My experience in Mexico is that everybody immediately wants to speak
"English" so the conversation ends up with me speaking Spanish and
them speaking English. But we do manage to communicate.
It's the same in the Netherlands. I've accidentally offended people
there by asking (in Dutch) whether they spoke English. The attitude
seems to be that it's unthinkable that they could not speak English.

In France, though, you'd be completely lost if you didn't know at least
a little French.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2018-05-10 08:46:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
[ ... ]
The language you want to improve in is a help, because
English-speakers are not fussy about correctness. Unlike the
French (de la France) and Germans, they do not resent errors as
insults, and most of them will not correct you unless you ask for
it.
I can't speak for the attitude of the Germans, but my experience
is that the French (de la France) are just like what you say of
English-speakers. I know I make plenty of errors in French, but
it's extremely rare that anyone corrects them, or even shows any
sign that they've noticed.
My experience in Mexico is that everybody immediately wants to speak
"English" so the conversation ends up with me speaking Spanish and
them speaking English. But we do manage to communicate.
It's the same in the Netherlands. I've accidentally offended people
there by asking (in Dutch) whether they spoke English. The attitude
seems to be that it's unthinkable that they could not speak English.
I went to the Netherlands for the first time as a student on a swimming
tour. After a week or so I gave up asking if people could speak English
because they all could. The only exception was a young woman who was
quite obviously, even from a distance, a Jehovah's Witness. When we
said we couldn't understand her we drew her attention to the captain of
our team, who could speak Afrikaans. He wasn't pleased.
Post by Peter Moylan
In France, though, you'd be completely lost if you didn't know at least
a little French.
Yes. Belgium (including francophone Belgium) is different, and you can
usual find someone who can cope with English.
--
athel
Tony Cooper
2018-05-10 12:50:17 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 10 May 2018 10:46:50 +0200, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
I went to the Netherlands for the first time as a student on a swimming
tour. After a week or so I gave up asking if people could speak English
because they all could. The only exception was a young woman who was
quite obviously, even from a distance, a Jehovah's Witness. When we
said we couldn't understand her we drew her attention to the captain of
our team, who could speak Afrikaans. He wasn't pleased.
That one lost me. How can one tell a Jehovah's Witness from a
distance?

Was she wearing a sandwich board with the cover of the "Watchtower"?
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2018-05-10 13:28:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tony Cooper
On Thu, 10 May 2018 10:46:50 +0200, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
I went to the Netherlands for the first time as a student on a swimming
tour. After a week or so I gave up asking if people could speak English
because they all could. The only exception was a young woman who was
quite obviously, even from a distance, a Jehovah's Witness. When we
said we couldn't understand her we drew her attention to the captain of
our team, who could speak Afrikaans. He wasn't pleased.
That one lost me. How can one tell a Jehovah's Witness from a
distance?
Well, it was a long time ago (1961), but she was dressed in a very
unfashionable way, without makeup, dowdy hair, and was carrying a bible
and some issues of Awake! and Watchtower.

If she'd been a Mormon she would have been male, accompanied by another
elder, wearing a white shirt and dark suit, with a little badge saying
Elder Whatever. (Probably the little badge wouldn't have been obvious
at the distance we decided she was a Jehovah's Witness.)
Post by Tony Cooper
Was she wearing a sandwich board with the cover of the "Watchtower"?
--
athel
Peter T. Daniels
2018-05-10 14:20:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Tony Cooper
On Thu, 10 May 2018 10:46:50 +0200, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
I went to the Netherlands for the first time as a student on a swimming
tour. After a week or so I gave up asking if people could speak English
because they all could. The only exception was a young woman who was
quite obviously, even from a distance, a Jehovah's Witness. When we
said we couldn't understand her we drew her attention to the captain of
our team, who could speak Afrikaans. He wasn't pleased.
That one lost me. How can one tell a Jehovah's Witness from a
distance?
Well, it was a long time ago (1961), but she was dressed in a very
unfashionable way, without makeup, dowdy hair, and was carrying a bible
and some issues of Awake! and Watchtower.
If you could see what her tracts were, she wasn't all that far away.

When I saw them (probably in the 1950s), they tended to be women in pairs,
middle-aged, and more likely African American than not.

My grandmother must have been polite to them and taken their literature,
because I think that's where I saw it. The indicia said that the tracts
were published in 44 languages, and once I asked if they had the ones in
different languages. (They didn't.)

I did once receive a copy of the Scripture, which isn't the same as the
Christian Bible (it's shorter -- I didn't try to figure out what they
omitted).
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
If she'd been a Mormon she would have been male, accompanied by another
elder, wearing a white shirt and dark suit, with a little badge saying
Elder Whatever. (Probably the little badge wouldn't have been obvious
at the distance we decided she was a Jehovah's Witness.)
LDS Elders are much younger than JW witnesses.
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Tony Cooper
Was she wearing a sandwich board with the cover of the "Watchtower"?
Tony Cooper
2018-05-10 16:29:55 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 10 May 2018 15:28:02 +0200, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Tony Cooper
On Thu, 10 May 2018 10:46:50 +0200, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
I went to the Netherlands for the first time as a student on a swimming
tour. After a week or so I gave up asking if people could speak English
because they all could. The only exception was a young woman who was
quite obviously, even from a distance, a Jehovah's Witness. When we
said we couldn't understand her we drew her attention to the captain of
our team, who could speak Afrikaans. He wasn't pleased.
That one lost me. How can one tell a Jehovah's Witness from a
distance?
Well, it was a long time ago (1961), but she was dressed in a very
unfashionable way, without makeup, dowdy hair, and was carrying a bible
and some issues of Awake! and Watchtower.
If she'd been a Mormon she would have been male, accompanied by another
elder, wearing a white shirt and dark suit, with a little badge saying
Elder Whatever. (Probably the little badge wouldn't have been obvious
at the distance we decided she was a Jehovah's Witness.)
Post by Tony Cooper
Was she wearing a sandwich board with the cover of the "Watchtower"?
The JWs that come around here travel in pairs. I could recognize them
as JWs from a distance because a) a pair of females, b) one or both
will be carrying a briefcase or satchel (presumably carrying their
literature), and c) no other door-to-door people are females.

I've never noticed how they dressed, though.

The Mormon d-t-ds are pairs of young males in white shirts (no jacket)
and bicycles parked nearby.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Peter Moylan
2018-05-10 17:10:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tony Cooper
On Thu, 10 May 2018 15:28:02 +0200, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
If she'd been a Mormon she would have been male, accompanied by
another elder, wearing a white shirt and dark suit, with a little
badge saying Elder Whatever. (Probably the little badge wouldn't
have been obvious at the distance we decided she was a Jehovah's
Witness.)
Post by Tony Cooper
Was she wearing a sandwich board with the cover of the
"Watchtower"?
The JWs that come around here travel in pairs. I could recognize
them as JWs from a distance because a) a pair of females, b) one or
both will be carrying a briefcase or satchel (presumably carrying
their literature), and c) no other door-to-door people are females.
I still remember the time when I got out of the shower, glanced through
a window, and noticed a couple of JWs working the street. Accordingly, I
decided not to put the towel around my waist when answering the door.

I never knew a couple of old ladies could run so fast.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
CDB
2018-05-10 20:53:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
If she'd been a Mormon she would have been male, accompanied by
another elder, wearing a white shirt and dark suit, with a little
badge saying Elder Whatever. (Probably the little badge wouldn't
have been obvious at the distance we decided she was a Jehovah's
Witness.)
Post by Tony Cooper
Was she wearing a sandwich board with the cover of the
"Watchtower"?
The JWs that come around here travel in pairs. I could recognize
them as JWs from a distance because a) a pair of females, b) one or
both will be carrying a briefcase or satchel (presumably carrying
their literature), and c) no other door-to-door people are
females.
I still remember the time when I got out of the shower, glanced
through a window, and noticed a couple of JWs working the street.
Accordingly, I decided not to put the towel around my waist when
answering the door.
I never knew a couple of old ladies could run so fast.
The JWs I've met haven't looked that spry. I know someone who insults
them in a loud voice, but I have engaged some in conversation several
times, partly out of curiosity and partly to see if I could shake their
faith (since I think there are better ones).

They have never seemed angry at being mistreated (I suppose because they
remember the Beatitudes) or disappointed at not making a convert,
possibly because they reflect that space in Heaven is limited and they
have done their own chances some good without increasing the number of
their competitors.

My parents lived in an area where many of their neighbours were Jewish,
there being a community centre and synagogue nearby. There was also a
Salvation Army HQ down the street; on Sunday they would march around
playing hymns and knocking on doors.

Once, when visiting my parents, I answered the door and responded
gravely "Oh, we're not Christians here (perfectly true: an atheist
Stoic, an agnostic Stoic, and an animist Stoic). He didn't run, but he
backed swiftly and apologetically away.
Rich Ulrich
2018-05-10 22:57:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by CDB
Once, when visiting my parents, I answered the door and responded
gravely "Oh, we're not Christians here (perfectly true: an atheist
Stoic, an agnostic Stoic, and an animist Stoic). He didn't run, but he
backed swiftly and apologetically away.
When I was age 10 or so, one day I was home sick from school
when my mother opened the door to a door-to-door sales-person
who opened with, "I'm here about something of a religious nature."

My mother, who was a polite lady who regularly taught
Sunday School classes, said, "Sorry, we're not interested"
and closed the door. I though that was rude of her.

I was nonplussed... I asked why she was so short with him.
She said, she wasn't going to buy anything, and she wasn't
going to waste her time and his time.

Maybe she didn't mention "wasting /his/ time." It was far
later that I fully grasped that notion -- that salesmen don't
need their time wasted, either.

More immediately, I adapted to the idea that you don't need
to be polite to everyone, all the time, without being "wrong."
Mom, of course, could do no wrong.

On reflection, most teenagers figure out how to be rude,
whether they have any home examples or not. But I did
gain an example of what still seems to be a /proper/ time for
rudeness.
--
Rich Ulrich
Cheryl
2018-05-11 08:21:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by Rich Ulrich
Post by CDB
Once, when visiting my parents, I answered the door and responded
gravely "Oh, we're not Christians here (perfectly true: an atheist
Stoic, an agnostic Stoic, and an animist Stoic). He didn't run, but he
backed swiftly and apologetically away.
When I was age 10 or so, one day I was home sick from school
when my mother opened the door to a door-to-door sales-person
who opened with, "I'm here about something of a religious nature."
My mother, who was a polite lady who regularly taught
Sunday School classes, said, "Sorry, we're not interested"
and closed the door. I though that was rude of her.
I was nonplussed... I asked why she was so short with him.
She said, she wasn't going to buy anything, and she wasn't
going to waste her time and his time.
Maybe she didn't mention "wasting /his/ time." It was far
later that I fully grasped that notion -- that salesmen don't
need their time wasted, either.
More immediately, I adapted to the idea that you don't need
to be polite to everyone, all the time, without being "wrong."
Mom, of course, could do no wrong.
On reflection, most teenagers figure out how to be rude,
whether they have any home examples or not. But I did
gain an example of what still seems to be a /proper/ time for
rudeness.
I've never thought "Sorry, I'm not interested" was rude. Hanging up on
someone is rude, but I've frequently done that to the telephone variety.

I don't think I've ever had much trouble with turning away people at the
door, whether they are religious, selling something, or political. I
have a vague memory of one of the sales types being a bit pushy, to the
extent that I was rude, and shut the door in his face, after trying the
"sorry, not interested" line. I get almost no door-to-door callers now
that I'm living in an apartment, even though most residents will
helpfully hold the security door at the building entrance open for
anyone who wants to get through. The only one I can remember was a
political campaigner, and she moved on as soon as I said I wasn't
interested.
--
Cheryl
Peter T. Daniels
2018-05-11 12:59:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by Cheryl
I've never thought "Sorry, I'm not interested" was rude. Hanging up on
someone is rude, but I've frequently done that to the telephone variety.
A fairly recent telemarketing strategy (it seems mostly to be used for
military/police charities) is that the call begins with a friendly voice
asking for you by name, and when you answer that they've got the right
person, there's an inordinate delay before they respond with the beginning
of the pitch, and it's immediately (or after one further exchange) that the
responses are canned -- probably synthesized, since no one could be so
"hearty" in that job for long -- and being selected by the unfortunate
human operator who is monitoring the responses.

It's not impolite to gently hang up after a few seconds.

Ooh -- I love the one (an actual person) who identifies herself as representing
a pro-life organization, interested in my opinion on important matters. The
first question is, "Are you pro-life or pro-choice?" (At least she doesn't
say "pro-abortion"). When she hears the answer she doesn't want, she hangs
up _immediately_.
Peter Moylan
2018-05-11 03:01:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by CDB
The JWs I've met haven't looked that spry. I know someone who
insults them in a loud voice, but I have engaged some in conversation
several times, partly out of curiosity and partly to see if I could
shake their faith (since I think there are better ones).
They have never seemed angry at being mistreated (I suppose because
they remember the Beatitudes) or disappointed at not making a
convert, possibly because they reflect that space in Heaven is
limited and they have done their own chances some good without
increasing the number of their competitors.
Isn't it the JWs who believe that only 144,000 people will get into
heaven: twelve thousand from each tribe? According to that theory, JWs
won't qualify unless they are also Jews.

(Even then, the 144,000 tickets must have sold out centuries ago.)
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Richard Tobin
2018-05-11 08:01:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
Isn't it the JWs who believe that only 144,000 people will get into
heaven: twelve thousand from each tribe? According to that theory, JWs
won't qualify unless they are also Jews.
Is there anywhere that isn't claimed to be home to the descendants of
one of the lost tribes?

(Except of course England which was settled by the Trojans, and
Scotland whose inhabitants, according to the Declaration of Arbroath,
came from Scythia.)

-- Richard
Peter T. Daniels
2018-05-11 12:53:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by Peter Moylan
Isn't it the JWs who believe that only 144,000 people will get into
heaven: twelve thousand from each tribe? According to that theory, JWs
won't qualify unless they are also Jews.
Is there anywhere that isn't claimed to be home to the descendants of
one of the lost tribes?
(Except of course England which was settled by the Trojans, and
Scotland whose inhabitants, according to the Declaration of Arbroath,
came from Scythia.)
Marlowe made Tamburlaine a Scythian shepherd.

He may have gotten his origin stories confused.
Jerry Friedman
2018-05-11 13:29:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by Peter Moylan
Isn't it the JWs who believe that only 144,000 people will get into
heaven: twelve thousand from each tribe? According to that theory, JWs
won't qualify unless they are also Jews.
Is there anywhere that isn't claimed to be home to the descendants of
one of the lost tribes?
Israel?
Post by Richard Tobin
(Except of course England which was settled by the Trojans, and
Scotland whose inhabitants, according to the Declaration of Arbroath,
came from Scythia.)
Too bad the British Israelites didn't listen.
--
Jerry Friedman
CDB
2018-05-11 13:00:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by CDB
The JWs I've met haven't looked that spry. I know someone who
insults them in a loud voice, but I have engaged some in
conversation several times, partly out of curiosity and partly to
see if I could shake their faith (since I think there are better
ones).
They have never seemed angry at being mistreated (I suppose
because they remember the Beatitudes) or disappointed at not making
a convert, possibly because they reflect that space in Heaven is
limited and they have done their own chances some good without
increasing the number of their competitors.
Isn't it the JWs who believe that only 144,000 people will get into
heaven: twelve thousand from each tribe? According to that theory,
JWs won't qualify unless they are also Jews.
Yes, a nice round number.
Post by Peter Moylan
(Even then, the 144,000 tickets must have sold out centuries ago.)
I have the impression that the competition remains open until Judgement
Day. I don't know if I got that from one of them.
--------------------------------
Apparently it isn't that simple:

'Based on a literal interpretation of scriptures such as Revelation
14:1–4, Jehovah's Witnesses believe that exactly 144,000 faithful
Christians go to heaven as spirit creatures to rule with Christ in the
kingdom of God. They believe that most of those are already in heaven,
and that the "remnant" at Revelation 12:17 (KJV) refers to those
remaining alive on earth who will be immediately resurrected to heaven
when they die. The Witnesses understand Jesus’ words at John 3:3—"except
a man be born again, he cannot see the kingdom of God"—to apply to the
144,000 who are "born again" as "anointed" sons of God in heaven.[144]
They associate the terms "Israel of God" (Galatians 6:16), "little
flock" (Luke 12:32), and "the bride, the Lamb's wife" (Revelation 21:9)
in the New Testament with the "anointed".[145][146]
Members who claim to be anointed are not given special treatment by
other congregation members.[147] Jehovah's Witnesses believe that being
"anointed" involves a personal revelation by God's spirit which "gives
positive assurance of adoption" to the individual alone.[148] Only those
claiming to be anointed partake of the unleavened bread and wine at the
yearly commemoration of Christ's death, or Memorial. According to The
Watchtower, "the Governing Body does not keep a list of all partakers,
for it does not maintain a global network of anointed ones."[21]

Other sheep[edit]

Watch Tower Society literature states that Jesus' use of the term "other
sheep" at John 10:16 indicates a separate class with an earthly
hope.[149] Those of the "other sheep" who die faithful to God will
receive the "resurrection of the righteous" ("just" KJV) mentioned at
Acts 24:15.[150] Those who die without faithfully serving God will
receive the "resurrection of the ... unrighteous" ("unjust" KJV). They
will be given the opportunity to join Jesus' "other sheep" and live
forever on a paradise earth.[151][152] Those destroyed at Armageddon and
other specific judgments by God are not resurrected.[153] Those of the
"other sheep" who survive Armageddon without needing a resurrection, are
referred to as the "great crowd".'

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jehovah%27s_Witnesses_beliefs#Salvation

Students who do not believe in an afterlife may omit the preceding chapter.
Peter Moylan
2018-05-11 03:03:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by CDB
Once, when visiting my parents, I answered the door and responded
gravely "Oh, we're not Christians here (perfectly true: an atheist
Stoic, an agnostic Stoic, and an animist Stoic). He didn't run, but
he backed swiftly and apologetically away.
My mother found it too stressful to answer the door to religious
campaigners, so she trained me as a child to go to the door and say
"Sorry, we're Catholic". That probably confused a few encyclopaedia
salesmen.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Anders D. Nygaard
2018-05-10 21:32:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tony Cooper
[...]
The Mormon d-t-ds are pairs of young males in white shirts (no jacket)
Must be the heat. In Denmark, they are (IME) always wearing jackets.
Post by Tony Cooper
and bicycles parked nearby.
I've never noticed. I'll try to have a look next time a see a pair.

/Anders, Denmark.
Tony Cooper
2018-05-11 00:44:17 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 10 May 2018 23:32:59 +0200, "Anders D. Nygaard"
Post by Anders D. Nygaard
Post by Tony Cooper
[...]
The Mormon d-t-ds are pairs of young males in white shirts (no jacket)
Must be the heat. In Denmark, they are (IME) always wearing jackets.
Post by Tony Cooper
and bicycles parked nearby.
I've never noticed. I'll try to have a look next time a see a pair.
/Anders, Denmark.
My comment specifically refers to Mormon d-t-ds in Florida. White
short-sleeved shirts, the lot of 'em. Always on bicycles and wearing
a helmet when not walking up your sidewalk.

The JWs travel in automobiles with four or six to a car. They park in
the area and spread out in pairs. Nicely dressed, if a bit plain.

The ones around here handle rejection politely, but I reject them
politely.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Peter Moylan
2018-05-11 03:06:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tony Cooper
On Thu, 10 May 2018 23:32:59 +0200, "Anders D. Nygaard"
Post by Anders D. Nygaard
[...] The Mormon d-t-ds are pairs of young males in white shirts
(no jacket)
Must be the heat. In Denmark, they are (IME) always wearing
jackets.
and bicycles parked nearby.
I've never noticed. I'll try to have a look next time a see a
pair.
My comment specifically refers to Mormon d-t-ds in Florida. White
short-sleeved shirts, the lot of 'em. Always on bicycles and
wearing a helmet when not walking up your sidewalk.
The JWs travel in automobiles with four or six to a car. They park
in the area and spread out in pairs. Nicely dressed, if a bit
plain.
The ones around here handle rejection politely, but I reject them
politely.
IIRC the central character in the play "The Book of Mormon" wanted to be
sent to Orlando, which was his idea of heaven.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Tony Cooper
2018-05-11 04:58:28 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 11 May 2018 13:06:50 +1000, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Tony Cooper
On Thu, 10 May 2018 23:32:59 +0200, "Anders D. Nygaard"
Post by Anders D. Nygaard
[...] The Mormon d-t-ds are pairs of young males in white shirts
(no jacket)
Must be the heat. In Denmark, they are (IME) always wearing
jackets.
and bicycles parked nearby.
I've never noticed. I'll try to have a look next time a see a pair.
My comment specifically refers to Mormon d-t-ds in Florida. White
short-sleeved shirts, the lot of 'em. Always on bicycles and
wearing a helmet when not walking up your sidewalk.
The JWs travel in automobiles with four or six to a car. They park
in the area and spread out in pairs. Nicely dressed, if a bit
plain.
The ones around here handle rejection politely, but I reject them
politely.
IIRC the central character in the play "The Book of Mormon" wanted to be
sent to Orlando, which was his idea of heaven.
I haven't seen the play, but there are a lot of Mormons in this area,
and they've been around a long time. The Deseret Ranch, established
in 1949, is just south of Orlando and owned by The Church of Christ of
Latter-Day Saints. It's a cattle ranch that is 300,000 acres in size.
Orlando is home to one of the 46 Mormon Temples in the US and the only
one in Florida. Prior to it being built, Mormons from the SE US had
to go to Atlanta or Columbia SC for a "sealing" (marriage) in a
Temple. There are about 12 Mormon churches in the area ("about"
because it depends on what you define as the Orlando area.)
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
CDB
2018-05-09 19:45:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
[ ... ]
The language you want to improve in is a help, because
English-speakers are not fussy about correctness. Unlike the
French (de la France) and Germans, they do not resent errors as
insults, and most of them will not correct you unless you ask for
it.
I can't speak for the attitude of the Germans, but my experience is
that the French (de la France) are just like what you say of
English-speakers. I know I make plenty of errors in French, but it's
extremely rare that anyone corrects them, or even shows any sign
that they've noticed.
In Paris? I'm glad to hear things have improved since IWAL. Maybe it
helps to be distinguished and venerable.
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2018-05-10 08:53:51 UTC
Permalink
Post by CDB
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
[ ... ]
The language you want to improve in is a help, because
English-speakers are not fussy about correctness. Unlike the
French (de la France) and Germans, they do not resent errors as
insults, and most of them will not correct you unless you ask for
it.
I can't speak for the attitude of the Germans, but my experience is
that the French (de la France) are just like what you say of
English-speakers. I know I make plenty of errors in French, but it's
extremely rare that anyone corrects them, or even shows any sign
that they've noticed.
In Paris?
Yes, even in Paris. When I reported to people in Birmingham that I had
found the French much less rude than I'd been led to believe they said
OK, but's that's the south, wait until you try Paris. However, I
haven't found Parisians any ruder than Marseillais. What they don't
like, however, is people who treat them as stupid if they don't
understand shouted English.
Post by CDB
I'm glad to hear things have improved since IWAL. Maybe it
helps to be distinguished and venerable.
--
athel
Peter T. Daniels
2018-05-04 12:38:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by Anton Shepelev
I am looking for a complete VIDEO tutorial of En-
glish grammar, from beginning to advanced levels.
Very easy to use, only practical topics. I would
prefer a whole course to download from the Internet
for free. I need it for my private, individual use
only.
Could anyone of you inform me about anything like
this? I would be very grateful.
Videos may be useful for such things as car repair
or guitar lessons, but for grammar they make no
sense. I suggest that you study grammar from good
https://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/11615
https://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/14006
3. A Manual of English Grammar and Compostion by
J.C. Nesfield
( I can share an electronic copy )
4. Practical English Usage by Michael Swan -- an
oft-recommented modern book, but too primitive
to my taste. I can send you an electronic
copy if it is not against your moral princi-
ples.
DO NOT FOLLOW ANY OF THOSE RECOMMENDATIONS.

UNLESS YOU WANT TO SOUND LIKE YOU LEARNED ENGLISH IN THE 18TH CENTURY.
Whiskers
1970-01-01 00:00:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Anton Shepelev
I am looking for a complete VIDEO tutorial of En-
glish grammar, from beginning to advanced levels.
Very easy to use, only practical topics. I would
prefer a whole course to download from the Internet
for free. I need it for my private, individual use
only.
Could anyone of you inform me about anything like
this? I would be very grateful.
Videos may be useful for such things as car repair
or guitar lessons, but for grammar they make no
sense. I suggest that you study grammar from good
https://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/11615
https://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/14006
3. A Manual of English Grammar and Compostion by
J.C. Nesfield
( I can share an electronic copy )
4. Practical English Usage by Michael Swan -- an
oft-recommented modern book, but too primitive
to my taste. I can send you an electronic
copy if it is not against your moral princi-
ples.
DO NOT FOLLOW ANY OF THOSE RECOMMENDATIONS.
UNLESS YOU WANT TO SOUND LIKE YOU LEARNED ENGLISH IN THE 18TH CENTURY.
Gadzooks. To be more acccurate, the first Gutenburg offering is
Georgian and the second, Victorian. Both active in the 19th
century. But indeed, possibly a tad weak on current street
talk.
--
^^^^^^^^^^
Whiskers
~~~~~~~~~~


----Android NewsGroup Reader----
http://usenet.sinaapp.com/
Colonel Edmund J. Burke
2018-05-10 14:24:45 UTC
Permalink
Pat, can we go out for drinks and discuss this issue?
Pat
2018-05-10 14:44:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by Colonel Edmund J. Burke
Pat, can we go out for drinks and discuss this issue?
I plan to fly to the USA again in a few months at the earliest.

Regards
Pat
Colonel Edmund J. Burke
2018-05-10 15:26:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by Pat
Post by Colonel Edmund J. Burke
Pat, can we go out for drinks and discuss this issue?
I plan to fly to the USA again in a few months at the earliest.
Regards
Pat
Keep me appraised.
Pat
2018-05-10 16:58:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by Colonel Edmund J. Burke
Post by Pat
Post by Colonel Edmund J. Burke
Pat, can we go out for drinks and discuss this issue?
I plan to fly to the USA again in a few months at the earliest.
Keep me appraised.
Thanks, providing that I understand the word "appraised" correctly.
By the way, the Cambridge English Dictionary after showing
general explanations, shows in addition the American translation.

Regards
Pat
Rich Ulrich
2018-05-10 22:25:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by Pat
Post by Colonel Edmund J. Burke
Post by Pat
Post by Colonel Edmund J. Burke
Pat, can we go out for drinks and discuss this issue?
I plan to fly to the USA again in a few months at the earliest.
Keep me appraised.
Thanks, providing that I understand the word "appraised" correctly.
By the way, the Cambridge English Dictionary after showing
general explanations, shows in addition the American translation.
I presume that "apprised" was intended, since that means "tell".

[Googling]. Gammarist.com reports that the two words
/can/ mean the same, but that happens when you use
a rare, secondary definition of "apprise" to mean "assess".
--
Rich Ulrich
Peter T. Daniels
2018-05-11 03:22:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by Rich Ulrich
Post by Pat
Post by Colonel Edmund J. Burke
Keep me appraised.
Thanks, providing that I understand the word "appraised" correctly.
By the way, the Cambridge English Dictionary after showing
general explanations, shows in addition the American translation.
I presume that "apprised" was intended, since that means "tell".
[Googling]. Gammarist.com reports that the two words
/can/ mean the same, but that happens when you use
a rare, secondary definition of "apprise" to mean "assess".
That doesn't make them interchangeable.

However, you are expecting proper usage from a moron who thinks a newsgroup
is a blog or diary outlet.
Colonel Edmund J. Burke
2018-05-11 14:58:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Rich Ulrich
Post by Pat
Post by Colonel Edmund J. Burke
Keep me appraised.
Thanks, providing that I understand the word "appraised" correctly.
By the way, the Cambridge English Dictionary after showing
general explanations, shows in addition the American translation.
I presume that "apprised" was intended, since that means "tell".
[Googling]. Gammarist.com reports that the two words
/can/ mean the same, but that happens when you use
a rare, secondary definition of "apprise" to mean "assess".
That doesn't make them interchangeable.
However, you are expecting proper usage from a moron who thinks a newsgroup
is a blog or diary outlet.
OH MY! HOW SNOBBISH!
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2018-05-11 08:15:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by Rich Ulrich
Post by Pat
Post by Colonel Edmund J. Burke
Post by Pat
Post by Colonel Edmund J. Burke
Pat, can we go out for drinks and discuss this issue?
I plan to fly to the USA again in a few months at the earliest.
Keep me appraised.
Thanks, providing that I understand the word "appraised" correctly.
By the way, the Cambridge English Dictionary after showing
general explanations, shows in addition the American translation.
I presume that "apprised" was intended, since that means "tell".
[Googling]. Gammarist.com reports that the two words
/can/ mean the same, but that happens when you use
a rare, secondary definition of "apprise" to mean "assess".
If I were Pat I'd be very cautious about making a date with the
Colonel. I suspect he's a sad specimen who lives in his mother's
basement, but he may be just as nasty as he makes out. There used to be
someone (I forget in which group*) whose signature read "On the
Internet nobody knows you're a jerk". In his case, however, it was only
too obvious.

*The Internet never forgets anything, however, and Google tells me it
was Ron Hardin at sci.math: the name is right, but I never went to
sci.math, so I must have come across him elsewhere, probably sci.lang.
--
athel
Colonel Edmund J. Burke
2018-05-11 14:59:17 UTC
Permalink
If I were Pat I'd be very cautious about making a date with the Colonel. I suspect he's a sad specimen who lives in his mother's basement, but he may be just as nasty as he makes out. There used to be someone (I forget in which group*) whose signature read "On the Internet nobody knows you're a jerk". In his case, however, it was only too obvious.
*The Internet never forgets anything, however, and Google tells me it was Ron Hardin at sci.math: the name is right, but I never went to sci.math, so I must have come across him elsewhere, probably sci.lang.
At least my mother didn't give me the effeminate name athel.
LOL
Colonel Edmund J. Burke
2018-05-11 14:57:51 UTC
Permalink
Post by Rich Ulrich
Post by Pat
Post by Colonel Edmund J. Burke
Post by Pat
Post by Colonel Edmund J. Burke
Pat, can we go out for drinks and discuss this issue?
I plan to fly to the USA again in a few months at the earliest.
Keep me appraised.
Thanks, providing that I understand the word "appraised" correctly.
By the way, the Cambridge English Dictionary after showing
general explanations, shows in addition the American translation.
I presume that "apprised" was intended, since that means "tell".
[Googling]. Gammarist.com reports that the two words
/can/ mean the same, but that happens when you use
a rare, secondary definition of "apprise" to mean "assess".
Yes, it was another typo. I feel ashamed...
Loading...