Discussion:
"Drivers license" or "Driver's license"?
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e***@gmail.com
2015-01-15 18:07:57 UTC
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My colleague and I have a dollar wager on this. The context is "Let me
see your driver(')s license. I believe it takes no apostrophe since it
is primarily considered to be a license for and not of drivers; she
believes otherwise. Who's correct? This is my first time posting to
this group, so please, go easy.
Grant
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R H Draney
2015-01-15 20:30:24 UTC
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My colleague and I have a dollar wager on this. The context is "Let me
see your driver(')s license. I believe it takes no apostrophe since it
is primarily considered to be a license for and not of drivers; she
believes otherwise. Who's correct? This is my first time posting to
this group, so please, go easy.
Mine says "DRIVER LICENSE"...no apostrophe...let me know if you get the
dollar....r
John Varela
2015-01-15 23:45:40 UTC
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Post by R H Draney
My colleague and I have a dollar wager on this. The context is "Let me
see your driver(')s license. I believe it takes no apostrophe since it
is primarily considered to be a license for and not of drivers; she
believes otherwise. Who's correct? This is my first time posting to
this group, so please, go easy.
Mine says "DRIVER LICENSE"...no apostrophe...let me know if you get the
dollar....r
In Virginia it's a Driver's License.
--
John Varela
Robert Bannister
2015-01-16 00:21:17 UTC
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Post by R H Draney
My colleague and I have a dollar wager on this. The context is "Let me
see your driver(')s license. I believe it takes no apostrophe since it
is primarily considered to be a license for and not of drivers; she
believes otherwise. Who's correct? This is my first time posting to
this group, so please, go easy.
Mine says "DRIVER LICENSE"...no apostrophe...let me know if you get the
dollar....r
Mine has "DRIVER'S LICENCE".
--
Robert Bannister - 1940-71 SE England
1972-now W Australia
Snidely
2015-01-19 07:56:37 UTC
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Post by Robert Bannister
Post by R H Draney
My colleague and I have a dollar wager on this. The context is "Let me
see your driver(')s license. I believe it takes no apostrophe since it
is primarily considered to be a license for and not of drivers; she
believes otherwise. Who's correct? This is my first time posting to
this group, so please, go easy.
Mine says "DRIVER LICENSE"...no apostrophe...let me know if you get the
dollar....r
Mine has "DRIVER'S LICENCE".
Mine has "CALIFORNIA DRIVER LICENSE"

"CALIFORNIA" is in 16pt or 24 pt serif caps,probably boldened (Times
New Roman? Palatino Linotype? Georgia?)

"DRIVER LICENSE" is in maybe 12pt sans-serif caps (Candara? Corbel?)
(Probably not Arial nor Lucida Sans)

/dps "over the top? moi?"
--
"That's a good sort of hectic, innit?"

" Very much so, and I'd recommend the haggis wontons."
-njm
Richard Bollard
2015-01-20 00:54:21 UTC
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On Fri, 16 Jan 2015 08:21:17 +0800, Robert Bannister
Post by Robert Bannister
Post by R H Draney
My colleague and I have a dollar wager on this. The context is "Let me
see your driver(')s license. I believe it takes no apostrophe since it
is primarily considered to be a license for and not of drivers; she
believes otherwise. Who's correct? This is my first time posting to
this group, so please, go easy.
Mine says "DRIVER LICENSE"...no apostrophe...let me know if you get the
dollar....r
Mine has "DRIVER'S LICENCE".
'DRIVER LICENCE" in the ACT.
--
Richard Bollard
Canberra Australia

To email, I'm at AMT not spAMT.
Peter Moylan
2015-01-20 03:15:03 UTC
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Post by Richard Bollard
On Fri, 16 Jan 2015 08:21:17 +0800, Robert Bannister
Post by Robert Bannister
Post by R H Draney
My colleague and I have a dollar wager on this. The context is "Let me
see your driver(')s license. I believe it takes no apostrophe since it
is primarily considered to be a license for and not of drivers; she
believes otherwise. Who's correct? This is my first time posting to
this group, so please, go easy.
Mine says "DRIVER LICENSE"...no apostrophe...let me know if you get the
dollar....r
Mine has "DRIVER'S LICENCE".
'DRIVER LICENCE" in the ACT.
Likewise in NSW. I'm sorry now that I didn't keep the old ones, because
it would be interesting to know when it changed. It might well have been
at the same time that the Geographical Names Board decided that it
didn't like apostrophes.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
JE SUIS CHARLIE
Peter T. Daniels
2015-01-20 04:19:22 UTC
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Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Richard Bollard
On Fri, 16 Jan 2015 08:21:17 +0800, Robert Bannister
Post by Robert Bannister
Post by R H Draney
Mine says "DRIVER LICENSE"...no apostrophe...let me know if you get the
dollar....r
Mine has "DRIVER'S LICENCE".
'DRIVER LICENCE" in the ACT.
Likewise in NSW. I'm sorry now that I didn't keep the old ones, because
it would be interesting to know when it changed. It might well have been
at the same time that the Geographical Names Board decided that it
didn't like apostrophes.
Hm. We don't get to keep our old ones. What's to stop someone from getting
their hands on it for nefarious purposes?
s***@gmail.com
2015-01-20 18:26:54 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Peter Moylan
Likewise in NSW. I'm sorry now that I didn't keep the old ones, because
it would be interesting to know when it changed. It might well have been
at the same time that the Geographical Names Board decided that it
didn't like apostrophes.
Hm. We don't get to keep our old ones. What's to stop someone from getting
their hands on it for nefarious purposes?
What would they do to accomplish those nefarious purposes? It has your DLN and
address, and maybe a poor copy of your signature, but those are easily
available online anyway, and the license is clearly expired (California changes
the look every few years, so expired licenses tend to stand out soon enough).

Also, how would someone obtain the old license, for with to perform nefarious
acts? In my case, they could get the one that expired last summer by stealing
my wallet, But then they would also have the a-lot-more-useful current
license. The license that expired 4 years ago is in my sock drawer, but if
someone is going through my sock drawer they are after more than just an
expired license.

And as the spammers point out, you can get a pretty good looking license that
doesn't say expired, just by slipping some cash under the table in a variety of
places.

/dps
Peter T. Daniels
2015-01-20 19:17:53 UTC
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Post by s***@gmail.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Peter Moylan
Likewise in NSW. I'm sorry now that I didn't keep the old ones, because
it would be interesting to know when it changed. It might well have been
at the same time that the Geographical Names Board decided that it
didn't like apostrophes.
Hm. We don't get to keep our old ones. What's to stop someone from getting
their hands on it for nefarious purposes?
What would they do to accomplish those nefarious purposes? It has your DLN and
address, and maybe a poor copy of your signature, but those are easily
available online anyway, and the license is clearly expired (California changes
the look every few years, so expired licenses tend to stand out soon enough).
Most ID-checkers don't read the details.
Post by s***@gmail.com
Also, how would someone obtain the old license, for with to perform nefarious
acts? In my case, they could get the one that expired last summer by stealing
my wallet, But then they would also have the a-lot-more-useful current
license. The license that expired 4 years ago is in my sock drawer, but if
someone is going through my sock drawer they are after more than just an
expired license.
And as the spammers point out, you can get a pretty good looking license that
doesn't say expired, just by slipping some cash under the table in a variety of
places.
Why bother paying "some cash" when you can steal an old one for free?
s***@gmail.com
2015-01-21 02:04:21 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by s***@gmail.com
What would they do to accomplish those nefarious purposes? It has your DLN and
address, and maybe a poor copy of your signature, but those are easily
available online anyway, and the license is clearly expired (California changes
the look every few years, so expired licenses tend to stand out soon enough).
Most ID-checkers don't read the details.
If it looks funny enough, you don't have to read the details.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Why bother paying "some cash" when you can steal an old one for free?
Because you like your picture better than you like mine?

/dps
GordonD
2015-01-20 10:45:11 UTC
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"Richard Bollard" wrote in message news:***@4ax.com...

On Fri, 16 Jan 2015 08:21:17 +0800, Robert Bannister
Post by Robert Bannister
Post by R H Draney
My colleague and I have a dollar wager on this. The context is "Let me
see your driver(')s license. I believe it takes no apostrophe since it
is primarily considered to be a license for and not of drivers; she
believes otherwise. Who's correct? This is my first time posting to
this group, so please, go easy.
Mine says "DRIVER LICENSE"...no apostrophe...let me know if you get the
dollar....r
Mine has "DRIVER'S LICENCE".
'DRIVER LICENCE" in the ACT.
=====================
Deciding what to call it can be quite important:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/northern_ireland/7899171.stm
--
Gordon Davie
Edinburgh, Scotland
Guy Barry
2015-01-16 08:47:09 UTC
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Post by R H Draney
My colleague and I have a dollar wager on this. The context is "Let me
see your driver(')s license. I believe it takes no apostrophe since it
is primarily considered to be a license for and not of drivers; she
believes otherwise. Who's correct? This is my first time posting to
this group, so please, go easy.
Mine says "DRIVER LICENSE"...no apostrophe...
"Driving licence" in this country, which avoids any such problems.
Post by R H Draney
let me know if you get the dollar....r
He must be pretty desperate if he's still waiting after more than fifteen
years.
--
Guy Barry
Tom P
2015-01-18 00:24:00 UTC
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Post by Guy Barry
Post by R H Draney
My colleague and I have a dollar wager on this. The context is "Let me
see your driver(')s license. I believe it takes no apostrophe since it
is primarily considered to be a license for and not of drivers; she
believes otherwise. Who's correct? This is my first time posting to
this group, so please, go easy.
Mine says "DRIVER LICENSE"...no apostrophe...
"Driving licence" in this country, which avoids any such problems.
Post by R H Draney
let me know if you get the dollar....r
He must be pretty desperate if he's still waiting after more than
fifteen years.
The German language distinguishes between the driver's license
(Führerschein) and the license to drive (Fahrerlaubnis, in Austria
Lenkerberechtigung). The driver's license says that you have a license
to drive, and is what you carry round in your wallet. Since 2013 the DL
is merged with the credit card sized European driver's license. The
license to drive is a document issued by the authorities after providing
proof that you have passed theoretical and practical tests of your
abilities to drive specific types of vehicle. Legally, there is a
distinction - for certain traffic infringements, as punishment, your
driver's license can be suspended for a specific period, and operating a
vehicle without a valid driver's license is an offense. However, for
more serious offenses, your license to drive can be invalidated, because
it is found that you do not fulfill the minimum requirements for being
able to operate a vehicle in a responsible fashion (for example repeated
drunken driving offenses). That means that you can no longer drive a
vehicle until you can prove that you are mentally and physically capable
of doing so, and have once again taken all the classes and passed
theoretical and practical tests of your abilities to drive.
Don Phillipson
2015-01-18 13:32:08 UTC
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"R H Draney" wrote in message
Post by R H Draney
Mine says "DRIVER LICENSE"...no apostrophe...
Monty Python's post office provided the model, viz.
dog licence, cat licence, fish licence etc.
--
Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs
(Ottawa, Canada)
Mark Brader
2015-01-18 19:44:54 UTC
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Post by Don Phillipson
Post by R H Draney
Mine says "DRIVER LICENSE"...no apostrophe...
Monty Python's post office provided the model, viz.
dog licence, cat licence...
Ah, so a driver license is a license to *own* a driver, as opposed
to a driver's license. Got it, thanks.
--
Mark Brader "I suppose that the distances from us [to the
Toronto stars] vary so much that some are two or three
***@vex.net times as remote as others." -- Galileo
Tony Cooper
2015-01-18 20:02:16 UTC
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Post by Mark Brader
Post by Don Phillipson
Post by R H Draney
Mine says "DRIVER LICENSE"...no apostrophe...
Monty Python's post office provided the model, viz.
dog licence, cat licence...
Ah, so a driver license is a license to *own* a driver, as opposed
to a driver's license. Got it, thanks.
In Miami, a driver license would be a license to shoot one during
season.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando FL
R H Draney
2015-01-18 20:30:29 UTC
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Post by Don Phillipson
"R H Draney" wrote in message
Post by R H Draney
Mine says "DRIVER LICENSE"...no apostrophe...
Monty Python's post office provided the model, viz.
dog licence, cat licence, fish licence etc.
In the very sketch that spoke of the "Ministry of Housinge"....r
charles
2015-01-18 20:39:16 UTC
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Post by Don Phillipson
"R H Draney" wrote in message
Post by R H Draney
Mine says "DRIVER LICENSE"...no apostrophe...
Monty Python's post office provided the model, viz.
dog licence, cat licence, fish licence etc.
Marriage Licence?
--
From KT24 in Surrey

Using a RISC OS computer running v5.18
Robert Bannister
2015-01-19 00:05:36 UTC
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Post by charles
Post by Don Phillipson
"R H Draney" wrote in message
Post by R H Draney
Mine says "DRIVER LICENSE"...no apostrophe...
Monty Python's post office provided the model, viz.
dog licence, cat licence, fish licence etc.
Marriage Licence?
Licentiousness is allowed once you're married.
--
Robert Bannister - 1940-71 SE England
1972-now W Australia
Pablo
2015-01-20 11:20:22 UTC
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My colleague and I have a dollar wager on this. The context is "Let me
see your driver(')s license. I believe it takes no apostrophe since it
is primarily considered to be a license for and not of drivers; she
believes otherwise. Who's correct? This is my first time posting to
this group, so please, go easy.
Easy. Driving licence.
--
Pablo

http://www.ipernity.com/home/313627
http://paulc.es/
Peter Moylan
2015-01-21 03:25:14 UTC
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Post by Pablo
My colleague and I have a dollar wager on this. The context is "Let me
see your driver(')s license. I believe it takes no apostrophe since it
is primarily considered to be a license for and not of drivers; she
believes otherwise. Who's correct? This is my first time posting to
this group, so please, go easy.
Easy. Driving licence.
That made me notice something that I must have missed on a first reading.

"A licence _for_ drivers" takes the same grammatical case as "A licence
_of_ drivers". Either way, then, it would be drivers' licence.

In this country, however, the licence covers only one driver. A licence
for one driver would be a driver's licence.

That's the grammatical point, which I think was the point of the
original question. As numerous respondents have pointed out, many
countries or states duck the issue by using a different phrasing.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
JE SUIS CHARLIE
Pablo
2015-01-21 12:18:57 UTC
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Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Pablo
My colleague and I have a dollar wager on this. The context is "Let me
see your driver(')s license. I believe it takes no apostrophe since it
is primarily considered to be a license for and not of drivers; she
believes otherwise. Who's correct? This is my first time posting to
this group, so please, go easy.
Easy. Driving licence.
That made me notice something that I must have missed on a first reading.
"A licence _for_ drivers" takes the same grammatical case as "A licence
_of_ drivers". Either way, then, it would be drivers' licence.
In this country, however, the licence covers only one driver. A licence
for one driver would be a driver's licence.
That's the grammatical point, which I think was the point of the
original question. As numerous respondents have pointed out, many
countries or states duck the issue by using a different phrasing.
I don't think it's ducking the issue. We do have "pilot's licence" as
opposed to "flying/piloting licence" - so basically one has a licence to be
a pilot and the other has a licence to drive. Innit.
--
Pablo

http://www.ipernity.com/home/313627
http://paulc.es/
b***@gmail.com
2015-01-29 18:21:00 UTC
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If you're begging the question as in "are you not carrying your driver's license again", you hopefully wouldn't actually spell it that way would you ... as in you actually told a cop after the accident you didn't have to carry your driver's license on you at all times if you didn't want to (especially after an accident), and then he had you arrested for bad grammar, dumb spelling, general stupidity, and for trying to say and spell you didn't have to have your "Driver's License" (or some other form of identification) on you at all times unless of course you were technically right and insisted on spelling it "Driver's license" ... Oy Dafka Oye!
Peter T. Daniels
2015-01-29 18:56:21 UTC
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Post by b***@gmail.com
If you're begging the question as in "are you not carrying your driver's license again", you hopefully wouldn't actually spell it that way would you ... as in you actually told a cop after the accident you didn't have to carry your driver's license on you at all times if you didn't want to (especially after an accident), and then he had you arrested for bad grammar, dumb spelling, general stupidity, and for trying to say and spell you didn't have to have your "Driver's License" (or some other form of identification) on you at all times unless of course you were technically right and insisted on spelling it "Driver's license" ... Oy Dafka Oye!
AUE seems not to be a good match for you.
j***@gmail.com
2019-10-13 02:42:09 UTC
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Driving license would make sense, since it's a license for driving. You wouldn't buy a hunter license would you?
Peter Moylan
2019-10-13 03:09:33 UTC
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Post by j***@gmail.com
Driving license would make sense, since it's a license for driving. You wouldn't buy a hunter license would you?
Well, if you want to shoot hunters ...
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
phil
2019-10-13 07:37:38 UTC
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Post by Peter Moylan
Post by j***@gmail.com
Driving license would make sense, since it's a license for driving.
You wouldn't buy a hunter license would you?
Well, if you want to shoot hunters ...
"Two game wardens, seven hunters, and a cow."
Ken Blake
2019-10-13 16:17:21 UTC
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Post by phil
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by j***@gmail.com
Driving license would make sense, since it's a license for driving.
You wouldn't buy a hunter license would you?
Well, if you want to shoot hunters ...
"Two game wardens, seven hunters, and a cow."
Sorry, I posted the same thing seconds before I saw your post.
phil
2019-10-15 06:42:36 UTC
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Post by Ken Blake
Post by phil
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by j***@gmail.com
Driving license would make sense, since it's a license for driving.
You wouldn't buy a hunter license would you?
Well, if you want to shoot hunters ...
"Two game wardens, seven hunters, and a cow."
Sorry, I posted the same thing seconds before I saw your post.
:)
RH Draney
2019-10-15 08:00:47 UTC
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Post by Ken Blake
Post by phil
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by j***@gmail.com
Driving license would make sense, since it's a license for driving.
You wouldn't buy a hunter license would you?
Well, if you want to shoot hunters ...
"Two game wardens, seven hunters, and a cow."
Sorry, I posted the same thing seconds before I saw your post.
:)
Ken was in no mood to trifle....r
charles
2019-10-13 10:23:18 UTC
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Post by Peter Moylan
Post by j***@gmail.com
Driving license would make sense, since it's a license for driving. You
wouldn't buy a hunter license would you?
Well, if you want to shoot hunters ...
2 game wardens, .....
--
from KT24 in Surrey, England
"I'd rather die of exhaustion than die of boredom" Thomas Carlyle
Ken Blake
2019-10-13 16:16:40 UTC
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On Sun, 13 Oct 2019 14:09:33 +1100, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by j***@gmail.com
Driving license would make sense, since it's a license for driving. You wouldn't buy a hunter license would you?
Well, if you want to shoot hunters ...
I went and shot the maximum the game laws would allow
Two game wardens, seven hunters, and a cow
Peter Young
2019-10-13 16:39:28 UTC
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Post by Ken Blake
On Sun, 13 Oct 2019 14:09:33 +1100, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by j***@gmail.com
Driving license would make sense, since it's a license for driving. You
wouldn't buy a hunter license would you?
Well, if you want to shoot hunters ...
I went and shot the maximum the game laws would allow
I tied them to my fender and I got them home somehow,
Post by Ken Blake
Two game wardens, seven hunters, and a cow
Peter.
--
Peter Young, (BrE, RP), Consultant Anaesthetist, 1975-2004.
(US equivalent: Certified Anesthesiologist) (AUE Hg)
Cheltenham and Gloucester, UK. Now happily retired.
http://pnyoung.orpheusweb.co.uk
Sam Plusnet
2019-10-13 17:22:00 UTC
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Post by Peter Moylan
Post by j***@gmail.com
Driving license would make sense, since it's a license for driving.
You wouldn't buy a hunter license would you?
Well, if you want to shoot hunters ...
You could also hunt shooters.
--
Sam Plusnet
Lewis
2019-10-13 03:56:12 UTC
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Post by j***@gmail.com
Driving license would make sense, since it's a license for driving.
You wouldn't buy a hunter license would you?
the license is not for driving, the license is a certification that you
are a qualified driver.
--
"The good news: Hadron Collider went live and did not destroy ALL
reality. Bad: I'm the only one who remembers President Gore's 2 terms."
Tony Cooper
2019-10-13 03:58:21 UTC
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Post by j***@gmail.com
Driving license would make sense, since it's a license for driving. You wouldn't buy a hunter license would you?
The State of Florida prints "Driver License" on them.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
RH Draney
2019-10-13 06:41:37 UTC
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Post by Tony Cooper
Post by j***@gmail.com
Driving license would make sense, since it's a license for driving. You wouldn't buy a hunter license would you?
The State of Florida prints "Driver License" on them.
So does the State of Arizona....r
John Varela
2019-10-13 22:06:43 UTC
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Post by RH Draney
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by j***@gmail.com
Driving license would make sense, since it's a license for driving. You wouldn't buy a hunter license would you?
The State of Florida prints "Driver License" on them.
So does the State of Arizona....r
In Virginia it's "Driver's".
--
John Varela
s***@gmail.com
2019-11-02 04:25:33 UTC
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Post by RH Draney
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by j***@gmail.com
Driving license would make sense, since it's a license for driving. You wouldn't buy a hunter license would you?
The State of Florida prints "Driver License" on them.
So does the State of Arizona....r
According to what's in my pocket, so does the Golden State.

/dps

Katy Jennison
2019-10-13 08:25:12 UTC
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Post by j***@gmail.com
Driving license would make sense, since it's a license for driving. You wouldn't buy a hunter license would you?
The UK version is a driving licence.
--
Katy Jennison
Peter Moylan
2019-10-13 09:44:45 UTC
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Post by Katy Jennison
Post by j***@gmail.com
Driving license would make sense, since it's a license for driving.
You wouldn't buy a hunter license would you?
The UK version is a driving licence.
The usual term in Australia, in speech, is driver's licence, but that's
not necessarily what is written on the item in question. My NSW licence
says "Driver Licence".

I don't have a putter licence.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Peter Young
2019-10-13 11:14:48 UTC
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Post by Katy Jennison
Post by j***@gmail.com
Driving license would make sense, since it's a license for driving. You
wouldn't buy a hunter license would you?
The UK version is a driving licence.
Because in BrE "Licence" is a noun and "License" is a verb.

Peter.
--
Peter Young, (BrE, RP), Consultant Anaesthetist, 1975-2004.
(US equivalent: Certified Anesthesiologist) (AUE Hg)
Cheltenham and Gloucester, UK. Now happily retired.
http://pnyoung.orpheusweb.co.uk
Peter T. Daniels
2019-10-13 13:46:52 UTC
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Post by Peter Young
Post by Katy Jennison
Post by j***@gmail.com
Driving license would make sense, since it's a license for driving. You
wouldn't buy a hunter license would you?
The UK version is a driving licence.
Because in BrE "Licence" is a noun and "License" is a verb.
Are they careful about prophecy and prophesy, which assign the letters
the same way but at least are pronounced differently?
Katy Jennison
2019-10-13 16:33:55 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Peter Young
Post by Katy Jennison
Post by j***@gmail.com
Driving license would make sense, since it's a license for driving. You
wouldn't buy a hunter license would you?
The UK version is a driving licence.
Because in BrE "Licence" is a noun and "License" is a verb.
Are they careful about prophecy and prophesy, which assign the letters
the same way but at least are pronounced differently?
If by 'they' you mean us Brits, yes insofar as any of us can speak for
people who actually use either word. Not a lot of people talk about
prophesying these days. If someone's pointing out that we're all
doomed, it's usually called a prediction, not a prophecy.
--
Katy Jennison
Tony Cooper
2019-10-13 17:08:19 UTC
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On Sun, 13 Oct 2019 17:33:55 +0100, Katy Jennison
Post by Katy Jennison
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Peter Young
Post by Katy Jennison
Post by j***@gmail.com
Driving license would make sense, since it's a license for driving. You
wouldn't buy a hunter license would you?
The UK version is a driving licence.
Because in BrE "Licence" is a noun and "License" is a verb.
Are they careful about prophecy and prophesy, which assign the letters
the same way but at least are pronounced differently?
If by 'they' you mean us Brits, yes insofar as any of us can speak for
people who actually use either word. Not a lot of people talk about
prophesying these days. If someone's pointing out that we're all
doomed, it's usually called a prediction, not a prophecy.
Prediction or surety? Given the leadership currently in place, doom
is imminent in both of our countries.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Steve Hayes
2019-10-31 04:14:52 UTC
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Post by Katy Jennison
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Are they careful about prophecy and prophesy, which assign the letters
the same way but at least are pronounced differently?
If by 'they' you mean us Brits, yes insofar as any of us can speak for
people who actually use either word. Not a lot of people talk about
prophesying these days. If someone's pointing out that we're all
doomed, it's usually called a prediction, not a prophecy.
I was puzzled by the title of a book I once saw in a book shop, "Advise
and consent".

It might have made sense if it were "Advice and consent", treating both
words as nouns, but making the first one a verb makes one wonder whether
the second was intended as a verb or a noun.

"Advise", like "prophesy", is pronounced as well as spelt differently
from the noun form.

But "consent", is pronounced the same, whether noun or verb, like
practice/practise, licence/license, and prophecy/prophesy.
--
Steve Hayes http://khanya.wordpress.com
Katy Jennison
2019-10-31 10:27:08 UTC
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Post by Steve Hayes
Post by Katy Jennison
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Are they careful about prophecy and prophesy, which assign the letters
the same way but at least are pronounced differently?
If by 'they' you mean us Brits, yes insofar as any of us can speak for
people who actually use either word. Not a lot of people talk about
prophesying these days. If someone's pointing out that we're all
doomed, it's usually called a prediction, not a prophecy.
I was puzzled by the title of a book I once saw in a book shop, "Advise
and consent".
It might have made sense if it were "Advice and consent", treating both
words as nouns, but making the first one a verb makes one wonder whether
the second was intended as a verb or a noun.
"Advise", like "prophesy", is pronounced as well as spelt differently
from the noun form.
But "consent", is pronounced the same, whether noun or verb, like
practice/practise, licence/license, and prophecy/prophesy.
Wait a sec: prophecy and prophesy aren't pronounced the same. Or are
they, for you? If so, I'm very surprised.

[Follow-up to aue only]
--
Katy Jennison
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2019-10-31 11:15:50 UTC
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Post by Katy Jennison
Post by Steve Hayes
Post by Katy Jennison
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Are they careful about prophecy and prophesy, which assign the letters
the same way but at least are pronounced differently?
If by 'they' you mean us Brits, yes insofar as any of us can speak for
people who actually use either word. Not a lot of people talk about
prophesying these days. If someone's pointing out that we're all
doomed, it's usually called a prediction, not a prophecy.
I was puzzled by the title of a book I once saw in a book shop, "Advise
and consent".
It might have made sense if it were "Advice and consent", treating both
words as nouns, but making the first one a verb makes one wonder whether
the second was intended as a verb or a noun.
"Advise", like "prophesy", is pronounced as well as spelt differently
from the noun form.
But "consent", is pronounced the same, whether noun or verb, like
practice/practise, licence/license, and prophecy/prophesy.
Wait a sec: prophecy and prophesy aren't pronounced the same. Or are
they, for you? If so, I'm very surprised.
They're quite different for me.
Post by Katy Jennison
[Follow-up to aue only]
--
athel
Peter T. Daniels
2019-10-31 14:09:12 UTC
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Post by Steve Hayes
Post by Katy Jennison
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Are they careful about prophecy and prophesy, which assign the letters
the same way but at least are pronounced differently?
If by 'they' you mean us Brits, yes insofar as any of us can speak for
people who actually use either word. Not a lot of people talk about
prophesying these days. If someone's pointing out that we're all
doomed, it's usually called a prediction, not a prophecy.
I was puzzled by the title of a book I once saw in a book shop, "Advise
and consent".
It might have made sense if it were "Advice and consent", treating both
words as nouns, but making the first one a verb makes one wonder whether
the second was intended as a verb or a noun.
"Advise", like "prophesy", is pronounced as well as spelt differently
from the noun form.
But "consent", is pronounced the same, whether noun or verb, like
practice/practise, licence/license, and prophecy/prophesy.
It's from the US Constitution:

Article II, Section 2, Clause 2:

"[The President] shall have Power, by and with the Advice and Consent of
the Senate, to make Treaties, provided two thirds of the Senators present
concur; and he shall nominate, and by and with the Advice and Consent of
the Senate, shall appoint Ambassadors, other public Ministers and Consuls,
Judges of the supreme Court, and all other Officers of the United States,
whose Appointments are not herein otherwise provided for, and which shall
be established by Law: but the Congress may by Law vest the Appointment of
such inferior Officers, as they think proper, in the President alone, in
the Courts of Law, or in the Heads of Departments."

What the Senate does is advise on and consent to presidential appointments.

It is a _very_ well known and celebrated novel of political intrigue and
became a pretty good movie not long after it was published.
RH Draney
2019-10-13 18:32:12 UTC
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Post by Katy Jennison
Post by j***@gmail.com
Driving license would make sense, since it's a license for driving.
You wouldn't buy a hunter license would you?
The UK version is a driving licence.
Brits license the act; Yanks the agent....r
Quinn C
2019-10-21 22:45:45 UTC
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Post by RH Draney
Post by Katy Jennison
Post by j***@gmail.com
Driving license would make sense, since it's a license for driving.
You wouldn't buy a hunter license would you?
The UK version is a driving licence.
Brits license the act; Yanks the agent....r
In Quebec, it depends on the language: Permis de conduire/Driver's
licence.
--
What Phrenzy in my Bosom rag'd,
And by what Care to be asswag'd?
-- Sappho, transl. Addison (1711)
What was it that my distracted heart most wanted?
-- transl. Barnard (1958)
Paul Carmichael
2019-10-13 13:46:00 UTC
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Post by j***@gmail.com
Driving license would make sense, since it's a license for driving.
Neither. It's "driving licence". :-)
--
Paul.

https://paulc.es/
https://asetrad.org
Steve Hayes
2019-10-31 04:04:10 UTC
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Post by j***@gmail.com
Driving license would make sense, since it's a license for driving. You
wouldn't buy a hunter license would you?
Mine is called a "Driving Licence".
--
Steve Hayes http://khanya.wordpress.com
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