Discussion:
"porridge"
(too old to reply)
Stefan Ram
2019-12-04 19:22:53 UTC
Permalink
German web pages often explain that porridge is a food
popular in England, so I was surprised when I heard a
Russian teacher say in a video (explaining «каша»): "I know
that English-speaking people don't say 'porridge' anymore.".

I then also found this in the World-Wide Web:

|does anyone actually use the word porridge outside of fairy tales?

. But I still think that what the the Russian teacher said is
exaggerated (or maybe she was referring to the American use?).
I'm sure that in England people still use "porridge" when
appropriate.
Mack A. Damia
2019-12-04 19:35:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by Stefan Ram
German web pages often explain that porridge is a food
popular in England, so I was surprised when I heard a
Russian teacher say in a video (explaining «????»): "I know
that English-speaking people don't say 'porridge' anymore.".
|does anyone actually use the word porridge outside of fairy tales?
. But I still think that what the the Russian teacher said is
exaggerated (or maybe she was referring to the American use?).
I'm sure that in England people still use "porridge" when
appropriate.
When I was a child, "porridge" was the standard. I don't recall ever
hearing "oatmeal". It may have changed.
Ken Blake
2019-12-04 20:35:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by Stefan Ram
German web pages often explain that porridge is a food
popular in England, so I was surprised when I heard a
Russian teacher say in a video (explaining «????»): "I know
that English-speaking people don't say 'porridge' anymore.".
|does anyone actually use the word porridge outside of fairy tales?
. But I still think that what the the Russian teacher said is
exaggerated (or maybe she was referring to the American use?).
I'm sure that in England people still use "porridge" when
appropriate.
When I was a child, "porridge" was the standard. I don't recall ever
hearing "oatmeal". It may have changed.
As I understand it, "porridge" means "hot cereal." Oatmeal is not
porridge; it's a *type* of porridge, although perhaps the most common kind.

Almost nobody say "porridge" in the US, but "oatmeal" is common." It's
what I say for that.

I have a friend who recently returned form the a visit to the UK. She
talked about frequently having porridge for breakfast.
--
Ken
Mack A. Damia
2019-12-04 20:58:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by Stefan Ram
German web pages often explain that porridge is a food
popular in England, so I was surprised when I heard a
Russian teacher say in a video (explaining «????»): "I know
that English-speaking people don't say 'porridge' anymore.".
|does anyone actually use the word porridge outside of fairy tales?
. But I still think that what the the Russian teacher said is
exaggerated (or maybe she was referring to the American use?).
I'm sure that in England people still use "porridge" when
appropriate.
When I was a child, "porridge" was the standard. I don't recall ever
hearing "oatmeal". It may have changed.
As I understand it, "porridge" means "hot cereal." Oatmeal is not
porridge; it's a *type* of porridge, although perhaps the most common kind.
Oatmeal (Quaker Oats) is what it is called in the USA, at least from
my experience. I have never heard it as "porridge".

But "porridge" is what oatmeal was called when I was a nipper, and I
think we had "Scott's Porage Oats". Note the spelling.

Loading Image...
Post by Ken Blake
Almost nobody say "porridge" in the US, but "oatmeal" is common." It's
what I say for that.
I have a friend who recently returned form the a visit to the UK. She
talked about frequently having porridge for breakfast.
Ken Blake
2019-12-04 21:12:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by Stefan Ram
German web pages often explain that porridge is a food
popular in England, so I was surprised when I heard a
Russian teacher say in a video (explaining «????»): "I know
that English-speaking people don't say 'porridge' anymore.".
|does anyone actually use the word porridge outside of fairy tales?
. But I still think that what the the Russian teacher said is
exaggerated (or maybe she was referring to the American use?).
I'm sure that in England people still use "porridge" when
appropriate.
When I was a child, "porridge" was the standard. I don't recall ever
hearing "oatmeal". It may have changed.
As I understand it, "porridge" means "hot cereal." Oatmeal is not
porridge; it's a *type* of porridge, although perhaps the most common kind.
Oatmeal (Quaker Oats) is what it is called in the USA, at least from
my experience.
Quaker Oats is a *brand* of oatmeal. Not all Oatmeal is Quaker Oats.

I have oatmeal for breakfast almost every day, but it's never Quaker Oats.
Post by Mack A. Damia
I have never heard it as "porridge".
Nor have I.
--
Ken
Mack A. Damia
2019-12-04 21:27:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by Stefan Ram
German web pages often explain that porridge is a food
popular in England, so I was surprised when I heard a
Russian teacher say in a video (explaining «????»): "I know
that English-speaking people don't say 'porridge' anymore.".
|does anyone actually use the word porridge outside of fairy tales?
. But I still think that what the the Russian teacher said is
exaggerated (or maybe she was referring to the American use?).
I'm sure that in England people still use "porridge" when
appropriate.
When I was a child, "porridge" was the standard. I don't recall ever
hearing "oatmeal". It may have changed.
As I understand it, "porridge" means "hot cereal." Oatmeal is not
porridge; it's a *type* of porridge, although perhaps the most common kind.
Oatmeal (Quaker Oats) is what it is called in the USA, at least from
my experience.
Quaker Oats is a *brand* of oatmeal. Not all Oatmeal is Quaker Oats.
If you order "oatmeal" in a diner in the USA, you will get what the
English call "porridge". Quaker Oats happens to be the most popular
brand in America with lots of varieties.

Quaker Oats now markets "Porridge to go" in the UK - fruit-flavored
breakfast squares made from oats of course.

I have tried steel cut oats, but I am not crazy about them.
Post by Ken Blake
I have oatmeal for breakfast almost every day, but it's never Quaker Oats.
Post by Mack A. Damia
I have never heard it as "porridge".
Nor have I.
Ken Blake
2019-12-04 22:24:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by Stefan Ram
German web pages often explain that porridge is a food
popular in England, so I was surprised when I heard a
Russian teacher say in a video (explaining «????»): "I know
that English-speaking people don't say 'porridge' anymore.".
|does anyone actually use the word porridge outside of fairy tales?
. But I still think that what the the Russian teacher said is
exaggerated (or maybe she was referring to the American use?).
I'm sure that in England people still use "porridge" when
appropriate.
When I was a child, "porridge" was the standard. I don't recall ever
hearing "oatmeal". It may have changed.
As I understand it, "porridge" means "hot cereal." Oatmeal is not
porridge; it's a *type* of porridge, although perhaps the most common kind.
Oatmeal (Quaker Oats) is what it is called in the USA, at least from
my experience.
Quaker Oats is a *brand* of oatmeal. Not all Oatmeal is Quaker Oats.
If you order "oatmeal" in a diner in the USA, you will get what the
English call "porridge". Quaker Oats happens to be the most popular
brand in America with lots of varieties.
Yes, it's the most popular brand that is sold to customers in grocery
stores in the USA. But "most popular brand of oatmeal" is not
synonymous with "oatmeal," and that was the point I was making.


If you order "oatmeal" in a diner in the USA, it is *highly* unlikely
that Quaker Oats is what you get. What you will get is not any brand,
and the diner doesn't buy it in packages; it buys generic oatmeal in
bulk, since it's much cheaper that way.

As I said, "I have oatmeal for breakfast almost every day, but it's
never Quaker Oats." It's generic oatmeal that I buy in bulk, just as the
diners do.
Post by Mack A. Damia
Quaker Oats now markets "Porridge to go" in the UK - fruit-flavored
breakfast squares made from oats of course.
I have tried steel cut oats, but I am not crazy about them.
Same here, but my reason is different from almost everyone else's I
don't cook my oatmeal. I eat it raw, with milk poured over it, just as
if it were Wheaties or Corn Flakes. That's the way I like it best. That
wouldn't work with steel-cut oats.
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by Ken Blake
I have oatmeal for breakfast almost every day, but it's never Quaker Oats.
Post by Mack A. Damia
I have never heard it as "porridge".
Nor have I.
--
Ken
Mack A. Damia
2019-12-04 23:15:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by Stefan Ram
German web pages often explain that porridge is a food
popular in England, so I was surprised when I heard a
Russian teacher say in a video (explaining «????»): "I know
that English-speaking people don't say 'porridge' anymore.".
|does anyone actually use the word porridge outside of fairy tales?
. But I still think that what the the Russian teacher said is
exaggerated (or maybe she was referring to the American use?).
I'm sure that in England people still use "porridge" when
appropriate.
When I was a child, "porridge" was the standard. I don't recall ever
hearing "oatmeal". It may have changed.
As I understand it, "porridge" means "hot cereal." Oatmeal is not
porridge; it's a *type* of porridge, although perhaps the most common kind.
Oatmeal (Quaker Oats) is what it is called in the USA, at least from
my experience.
Quaker Oats is a *brand* of oatmeal. Not all Oatmeal is Quaker Oats.
If you order "oatmeal" in a diner in the USA, you will get what the
English call "porridge". Quaker Oats happens to be the most popular
brand in America with lots of varieties.
Yes, it's the most popular brand that is sold to customers in grocery
stores in the USA. But "most popular brand of oatmeal" is not
synonymous with "oatmeal," and that was the point I was making.
If you order "oatmeal" in a diner in the USA, it is *highly* unlikely
that Quaker Oats is what you get. What you will get is not any brand,
and the diner doesn't buy it in packages; it buys generic oatmeal in
bulk, since it's much cheaper that way.
As I said, "I have oatmeal for breakfast almost every day, but it's
never Quaker Oats." It's generic oatmeal that I buy in bulk, just as the
diners do.
I know of some, but I am sure that most major brands produce product
in bulk strictly for restaurant use. Is it "For commercial use only"?
I think I have see that written on some packages.
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Mack A. Damia
Quaker Oats now markets "Porridge to go" in the UK - fruit-flavored
breakfast squares made from oats of course.
I have tried steel cut oats, but I am not crazy about them.
Same here, but my reason is different from almost everyone else's I
don't cook my oatmeal. I eat it raw, with milk poured over it, just as
if it were Wheaties or Corn Flakes. That's the way I like it best. That
wouldn't work with steel-cut oats.
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by Ken Blake
I have oatmeal for breakfast almost every day, but it's never Quaker Oats.
Post by Mack A. Damia
I have never heard it as "porridge".
Nor have I.
Ken Blake
2019-12-04 23:54:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by Stefan Ram
German web pages often explain that porridge is a food
popular in England, so I was surprised when I heard a
Russian teacher say in a video (explaining «????»): "I know
that English-speaking people don't say 'porridge' anymore.".
|does anyone actually use the word porridge outside of fairy tales?
. But I still think that what the the Russian teacher said is
exaggerated (or maybe she was referring to the American use?).
I'm sure that in England people still use "porridge" when
appropriate.
When I was a child, "porridge" was the standard. I don't recall ever
hearing "oatmeal". It may have changed.
As I understand it, "porridge" means "hot cereal." Oatmeal is not
porridge; it's a *type* of porridge, although perhaps the most common kind.
Oatmeal (Quaker Oats) is what it is called in the USA, at least from
my experience.
Quaker Oats is a *brand* of oatmeal. Not all Oatmeal is Quaker Oats.
If you order "oatmeal" in a diner in the USA, you will get what the
English call "porridge". Quaker Oats happens to be the most popular
brand in America with lots of varieties.
Yes, it's the most popular brand that is sold to customers in grocery
stores in the USA. But "most popular brand of oatmeal" is not
synonymous with "oatmeal," and that was the point I was making.
If you order "oatmeal" in a diner in the USA, it is *highly* unlikely
that Quaker Oats is what you get. What you will get is not any brand,
and the diner doesn't buy it in packages; it buys generic oatmeal in
bulk, since it's much cheaper that way.
As I said, "I have oatmeal for breakfast almost every day, but it's
never Quaker Oats." It's generic oatmeal that I buy in bulk, just as the
diners do.
I know of some, but I am sure that most major brands produce product
in bulk strictly for restaurant use.
I didn't mean "strictly for restaurant use." I simply meant that the
unbranded generic product was available, and that restaurants almost
certainly buy it, because it is cheaper. It's available to me, even
though I'm not a restaurant, and I also buy it because it's cheaper.

Is it possible that even though it's unbranded, it's made by the same
company that makes Quaker Oats? Of course it is. It might be like
aspirin; there are only four companies that make it, and if you buy a
generic product, it's made by one of them.
Post by Mack A. Damia
Is it "For commercial use only"?
I think I have see that written on some packages.
I don't remember ever seeing that written. What I buy isn't sold in
packages. It's sold by the pound. I just scoop up as much as I want from
a barrel and it's weighed at the checkout counter.
--
Ken
Mack A. Damia
2019-12-05 00:39:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by Stefan Ram
German web pages often explain that porridge is a food
popular in England, so I was surprised when I heard a
Russian teacher say in a video (explaining «????»): "I know
that English-speaking people don't say 'porridge' anymore.".
|does anyone actually use the word porridge outside of fairy tales?
. But I still think that what the the Russian teacher said is
exaggerated (or maybe she was referring to the American use?).
I'm sure that in England people still use "porridge" when
appropriate.
When I was a child, "porridge" was the standard. I don't recall ever
hearing "oatmeal". It may have changed.
As I understand it, "porridge" means "hot cereal." Oatmeal is not
porridge; it's a *type* of porridge, although perhaps the most common kind.
Oatmeal (Quaker Oats) is what it is called in the USA, at least from
my experience.
Quaker Oats is a *brand* of oatmeal. Not all Oatmeal is Quaker Oats.
If you order "oatmeal" in a diner in the USA, you will get what the
English call "porridge". Quaker Oats happens to be the most popular
brand in America with lots of varieties.
Yes, it's the most popular brand that is sold to customers in grocery
stores in the USA. But "most popular brand of oatmeal" is not
synonymous with "oatmeal," and that was the point I was making.
If you order "oatmeal" in a diner in the USA, it is *highly* unlikely
that Quaker Oats is what you get. What you will get is not any brand,
and the diner doesn't buy it in packages; it buys generic oatmeal in
bulk, since it's much cheaper that way.
As I said, "I have oatmeal for breakfast almost every day, but it's
never Quaker Oats." It's generic oatmeal that I buy in bulk, just as the
diners do.
I know of some, but I am sure that most major brands produce product
in bulk strictly for restaurant use.
I didn't mean "strictly for restaurant use." I simply meant that the
unbranded generic product was available, and that restaurants almost
certainly buy it, because it is cheaper. It's available to me, even
though I'm not a restaurant, and I also buy it because it's cheaper.
Is it possible that even though it's unbranded, it's made by the same
company that makes Quaker Oats? Of course it is. It might be like
aspirin; there are only four companies that make it, and if you buy a
generic product, it's made by one of them.
Post by Mack A. Damia
Is it "For commercial use only"?
I think I have see that written on some packages.
I don't remember ever seeing that written. What I buy isn't sold in
packages. It's sold by the pound. I just scoop up as much as I want from
a barrel and it's weighed at the checkout counter.
I was digressing a bit, and I was not referring only to oatmeal.
Sometimes, you will find products with that designation at discount
shops or flea markets. All kinds of stuff.
Tony Cooper
2019-12-05 01:08:05 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 04 Dec 2019 16:39:44 -0800, Mack A. Damia
Post by Mack A. Damia
I was digressing a bit, and I was not referring only to oatmeal.
Sometimes, you will find products with that designation at discount
shops or flea markets. All kinds of stuff.
That makes the product seem rather second-rate. Many grocery store
have private brands are the name brand products
canned/bottled/packaged with the store brand labels. There's no
difference in the product.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Mack A. Damia
2019-12-05 01:29:58 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 04 Dec 2019 20:08:05 -0500, Tony Cooper
Post by Tony Cooper
On Wed, 04 Dec 2019 16:39:44 -0800, Mack A. Damia
Post by Mack A. Damia
I was digressing a bit, and I was not referring only to oatmeal.
Sometimes, you will find products with that designation at discount
shops or flea markets. All kinds of stuff.
That makes the product seem rather second-rate. Many grocery store
have private brands are the name brand products
canned/bottled/packaged with the store brand labels. There's no
difference in the product.
Don't know. I guess it could work the other way: They may better
than the product packaged for public use. I am specifically thinking
of cleaning products. Just a guess.

You must have been at a flea market or something and noticed, say,
packs or boxes of the small napkins used in diners. Other stuff, too.
Here is a medical cotton roll:

Loading Image...

Probably made available after a business closes down - or they could
even be stolen.
Tony Cooper
2019-12-05 03:00:48 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 04 Dec 2019 17:29:58 -0800, Mack A. Damia
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Wed, 04 Dec 2019 20:08:05 -0500, Tony Cooper
Post by Tony Cooper
On Wed, 04 Dec 2019 16:39:44 -0800, Mack A. Damia
Post by Mack A. Damia
I was digressing a bit, and I was not referring only to oatmeal.
Sometimes, you will find products with that designation at discount
shops or flea markets. All kinds of stuff.
That makes the product seem rather second-rate. Many grocery store
have private brands are the name brand products
canned/bottled/packaged with the store brand labels. There's no
difference in the product.
Don't know. I guess it could work the other way: They may better
than the product packaged for public use. I am specifically thinking
of cleaning products. Just a guess.
You must have been at a flea market or something and noticed, say,
packs or boxes of the small napkins used in diners. Other stuff, too.
https://5.imimg.com/data5/AC/FL/ZP/SELLER-69982576/medical-cotton-roll-500x500.jpg
Probably made available after a business closes down - or they could
even be stolen.
Sure, I do agree that some stuff is sold at flea markets and discount
stores. Some may be brand name items with torn labels or dented cans
that a regular store has removed from stock. Some may be out-dated
regular products.

I simply wanted to add that some store private labeled stuff is the
same as brand name items, but priced better.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Peter Moylan
2019-12-05 11:17:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ken Blake
On Wed, 4 Dec 2019 13:35:20 -0700, Ken Blake
Post by Ken Blake
As I understand it, "porridge" means "hot cereal." Oatmeal is not
porridge; it's a *type* of porridge, although perhaps the most common kind.
Oatmeal (Quaker Oats) is what it is called in the USA, at least
from my experience.
Quaker Oats is a *brand* of oatmeal. Not all Oatmeal is Quaker Oats.
I have oatmeal for breakfast almost every day, but it's never Quaker Oats.
There was a time when I had oatmeal for breakfast every day, but I never
cooked it into porridge. I preferred it raw.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Katy Jennison
2019-12-05 12:41:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Ken Blake
On Wed, 4 Dec 2019 13:35:20 -0700, Ken Blake
Post by Ken Blake
As I understand it, "porridge" means "hot cereal." Oatmeal is not
 porridge; it's a *type* of porridge, although perhaps the most
common kind.
Oatmeal (Quaker Oats) is what it is called in the USA, at least
from my experience.
Quaker Oats is a *brand* of oatmeal. Not all Oatmeal is Quaker Oats.
I have oatmeal for breakfast almost every day, but it's never Quaker Oats.
There was a time when I had oatmeal for breakfast every day, but I never
cooked it into porridge. I preferred it raw.
So you follow the Leftondian usage, then. BrE oatmeal wouldn't be the
sort of thing you'd want to eat raw.

Rolled oats, which I take you to mean, have actually been steamed, if
not precisely cooked as such. They're one of the components from which
I assemble my normal muesli-like breakfast bowl.
--
Katy Jennison
Ken Blake
2019-12-05 16:12:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Ken Blake
On Wed, 4 Dec 2019 13:35:20 -0700, Ken Blake
Post by Ken Blake
As I understand it, "porridge" means "hot cereal." Oatmeal is not
porridge; it's a *type* of porridge, although perhaps the most common kind.
Oatmeal (Quaker Oats) is what it is called in the USA, at least
from my experience.
Quaker Oats is a *brand* of oatmeal. Not all Oatmeal is Quaker Oats.
I have oatmeal for breakfast almost every day, but it's never Quaker Oats.
There was a time when I had oatmeal for breakfast every day, but I never
cooked it into porridge. I preferred it raw.
That's the way I still eat it, as I think I said in another message in
the thread.
--
Ken
b***@shaw.ca
2019-12-05 01:59:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Mack A. Damia
When I was a child, "porridge" was the standard. I don't recall ever
hearing "oatmeal". It may have changed.
As I understand it, "porridge" means "hot cereal." Oatmeal is not
porridge; it's a *type* of porridge, although perhaps the most common kind.
I think you have it right. What is called porridge around the
English-speaking world can be made with at least five or six
different grains. Oatmeal is probably the most common, but
I've also had corn meal (or maize, depending on where you are)
as my main porridge ingredient.

When I was a kid in the postwar Netherlands, my mother would
use stale bread to fill out the oatmeal porridge. The kids much
preferred the days when she'd make French toast ("gebakken brood")
with it instead.
Post by Ken Blake
Almost nobody say "porridge" in the US, but "oatmeal" is common." It's
what I say for that.
For me, it's either oatmeal porridge, or cornmeal porridge.

bill
Tony Cooper
2019-12-05 03:03:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by b***@shaw.ca
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Mack A. Damia
When I was a child, "porridge" was the standard. I don't recall ever
hearing "oatmeal". It may have changed.
As I understand it, "porridge" means "hot cereal." Oatmeal is not
porridge; it's a *type* of porridge, although perhaps the most common kind.
I think you have it right. What is called porridge around the
English-speaking world can be made with at least five or six
different grains. Oatmeal is probably the most common, but
I've also had corn meal (or maize, depending on where you are)
as my main porridge ingredient.
When I was a kid in the postwar Netherlands, my mother would
use stale bread to fill out the oatmeal porridge. The kids much
preferred the days when she'd make French toast ("gebakken brood")
with it instead.
My mother made French toast with stale bread and only stale bread.
Sometimes she'd deliberately leave bread out to become stale for
French toast. I've convinced my wife to use stale bread for French
toast.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Ken Blake
2019-12-05 16:09:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by b***@shaw.ca
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Mack A. Damia
When I was a child, "porridge" was the standard. I don't recall ever
hearing "oatmeal". It may have changed.
As I understand it, "porridge" means "hot cereal." Oatmeal is not
porridge; it's a *type* of porridge, although perhaps the most common kind.
I think you have it right. What is called porridge around the
English-speaking world can be made with at least five or six
different grains. Oatmeal is probably the most common, but
I've also had corn meal (or maize, depending on where you are)
as my main porridge ingredient.
When I was a kid in the postwar Netherlands, my mother would
use stale bread to fill out the oatmeal porridge. The kids much
preferred the days when she'd make French toast ("gebakken brood")
with it instead.
My mother made French toast with stale bread and only stale bread.
Sometimes she'd deliberately leave bread out to become stale for
French toast. I've convinced my wife to use stale bread for French
toast.
In my experience the best French toast is made from Challah.
--
Ken
Peter T. Daniels
2019-12-05 15:42:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by b***@shaw.ca
I think you have it right. What is called porridge around the
English-speaking world can be made with at least five or six
different grains. Oatmeal is probably the most common, but
I've also had corn meal (or maize, depending on where you are)
as my main porridge ingredient.
Mmm, Indian pudding! A Boston specialty. I liked it so much I tried
to make it when I got home to Chicago. There was a recipe on the
Karo Syrup bottle (the dark one, I think), and trying to follow it
resulted in an utterly ruined pot ("saucepan"). And on The Great
British Baking Show they're always making caramel by melting and
cooking sugar.
Ken Blake
2019-12-05 16:07:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by b***@shaw.ca
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Mack A. Damia
When I was a child, "porridge" was the standard. I don't recall ever
hearing "oatmeal". It may have changed.
As I understand it, "porridge" means "hot cereal." Oatmeal is not
porridge; it's a *type* of porridge, although perhaps the most common kind.
I think you have it right. What is called porridge around the
English-speaking world can be made with at least five or six
different grains.
Not only grains, but also peas, as someone pointed out, quoting the rhyme.
--
Ken
Tristan Miller
2019-12-04 21:12:52 UTC
Permalink
Greetings.
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by Stefan Ram
German web pages often explain that porridge is a food
popular in England, so I was surprised when I heard a
Russian teacher say in a video (explaining «????»): "I know
that English-speaking people don't say 'porridge' anymore.".
|does anyone actually use the word porridge outside of fairy tales?
. But I still think that what the the Russian teacher said is
exaggerated (or maybe she was referring to the American use?).
I'm sure that in England people still use "porridge" when
appropriate.
When I was a child, "porridge" was the standard. I don't recall ever
hearing "oatmeal". It may have changed.
What terms do/did you use when you need to differentiate between
different kinds of porridge, such as that made from oats versus that
made from farina/semolina?

Regards,
Tristan
--
=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-
Tristan Miller
Free Software developer, ferret herder, logologist
https://logological.org/
=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-
Mack A. Damia
2019-12-04 21:30:52 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 4 Dec 2019 22:12:52 +0100, Tristan Miller
Post by Tristan Miller
Greetings.
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by Stefan Ram
German web pages often explain that porridge is a food
popular in England, so I was surprised when I heard a
Russian teacher say in a video (explaining «????»): "I know
that English-speaking people don't say 'porridge' anymore.".
|does anyone actually use the word porridge outside of fairy tales?
. But I still think that what the the Russian teacher said is
exaggerated (or maybe she was referring to the American use?).
I'm sure that in England people still use "porridge" when
appropriate.
When I was a child, "porridge" was the standard. I don't recall ever
hearing "oatmeal". It may have changed.
What terms do/did you use when you need to differentiate between
different kinds of porridge, such as that made from oats versus that
made from farina/semolina?
I don't recall having anything else but oats as far a "porridge" goes.
What else would have been on the market in the late 1940s and early
1950s? I never heard of having farina or semolina when I was a child.
Ken Blake
2019-12-04 22:26:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Wed, 4 Dec 2019 22:12:52 +0100, Tristan Miller
Post by Tristan Miller
Greetings.
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by Stefan Ram
German web pages often explain that porridge is a food
popular in England, so I was surprised when I heard a
Russian teacher say in a video (explaining «????»): "I know
that English-speaking people don't say 'porridge' anymore.".
|does anyone actually use the word porridge outside of fairy tales?
. But I still think that what the the Russian teacher said is
exaggerated (or maybe she was referring to the American use?).
I'm sure that in England people still use "porridge" when
appropriate.
When I was a child, "porridge" was the standard. I don't recall ever
hearing "oatmeal". It may have changed.
What terms do/did you use when you need to differentiate between
different kinds of porridge, such as that made from oats versus that
made from farina/semolina?
I don't recall having anything else but oats as far a "porridge" goes.
What else would have been on the market in the late 1940s and early
1950s? I never heard of having farina or semolina when I was a child.
When I was a child, my mother sometimes made oatmeal for me, sometimes
farina, and sometimes a product called "Wheatina." I don't remember ever
having semolina.
--
Ken
Quinn C
2019-12-04 22:43:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Wed, 4 Dec 2019 22:12:52 +0100, Tristan Miller
Post by Tristan Miller
What terms do/did you use when you need to differentiate between
different kinds of porridge, such as that made from oats versus that
made from farina/semolina?
I don't recall having anything else but oats as far a "porridge" goes.
What else would have been on the market in the late 1940s and early
1950s? I never heard of having farina or semolina when I was a child.
When I was a child, my mother sometimes made oatmeal for me, sometimes
farina, and sometimes a product called "Wheatina." I don't remember ever
having semolina.
I'm not sure about the difference between farina and semolina. From
looking at a few pages, semolina is used mainly for durum wheat
product. Otherwise, I think the two are much the same.
--
Germany is not a typical European nation, nor even a typical
Great Power; shaped by history, it has acquired a unique
character and played a unique role, a role almost entirely
aggressive and destructive, an alien body in the structure
of European civilization. -- A.J.P. Taylor
Ken Blake
2019-12-04 23:43:37 UTC
Permalink
Post by Quinn C
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Wed, 4 Dec 2019 22:12:52 +0100, Tristan Miller
Post by Tristan Miller
What terms do/did you use when you need to differentiate between
different kinds of porridge, such as that made from oats versus that
made from farina/semolina?
I don't recall having anything else but oats as far a "porridge" goes.
What else would have been on the market in the late 1940s and early
1950s? I never heard of having farina or semolina when I was a child.
When I was a child, my mother sometimes made oatmeal for me, sometimes
farina, and sometimes a product called "Wheatina." I don't remember ever
having semolina.
I'm not sure about the difference between farina and semolina. From
looking at a few pages, semolina is used mainly for durum wheat
product. Otherwise, I think the two are much the same.
I'm not sure either. I remember the name "farina," and I even remember
what it tasted like. but I really don't know what it referred to.

The only use of the word "semolina" that I'm familiar with is for the
kind of wheat that pasta is (or should be) made from. High-quality
imported Italian pasta is made from semolina; ordinary cheap American
pasta brands are made from some cheaper kind of wheat.
--
Ken
Peter T. Daniels
2019-12-05 15:38:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Quinn C
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Wed, 4 Dec 2019 22:12:52 +0100, Tristan Miller
Post by Tristan Miller
What terms do/did you use when you need to differentiate between
different kinds of porridge, such as that made from oats versus that
made from farina/semolina?
I don't recall having anything else but oats as far a "porridge" goes.
What else would have been on the market in the late 1940s and early
1950s? I never heard of having farina or semolina when I was a child.
When I was a child, my mother sometimes made oatmeal for me, sometimes
farina, and sometimes a product called "Wheatina." I don't remember ever
having semolina.
I'm not sure about the difference between farina and semolina. From
looking at a few pages, semolina is used mainly for durum wheat
product. Otherwise, I think the two are much the same.
I'm not sure either. I remember the name "farina," and I even remember
what it tasted like. but I really don't know what it referred to.
The only use of the word "semolina" that I'm familiar with is for the
kind of wheat that pasta is (or should be) made from. High-quality
imported Italian pasta is made from semolina; ordinary cheap American
pasta brands are made from some cheaper kind of wheat.
It's amazing how much typing Blake has to do to repeat everything I've
already said in this thread -- if he really felt a need to contribute,
a simple "+1" would do.
Mack A. Damia
2019-12-04 23:05:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Wed, 4 Dec 2019 22:12:52 +0100, Tristan Miller
Post by Tristan Miller
Greetings.
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by Stefan Ram
German web pages often explain that porridge is a food
popular in England, so I was surprised when I heard a
Russian teacher say in a video (explaining «????»): "I know
that English-speaking people don't say 'porridge' anymore.".
|does anyone actually use the word porridge outside of fairy tales?
. But I still think that what the the Russian teacher said is
exaggerated (or maybe she was referring to the American use?).
I'm sure that in England people still use "porridge" when
appropriate.
When I was a child, "porridge" was the standard. I don't recall ever
hearing "oatmeal". It may have changed.
What terms do/did you use when you need to differentiate between
different kinds of porridge, such as that made from oats versus that
made from farina/semolina?
I don't recall having anything else but oats as far a "porridge" goes.
What else would have been on the market in the late 1940s and early
1950s? I never heard of having farina or semolina when I was a child.
When I was a child, my mother sometimes made oatmeal for me, sometimes
farina, and sometimes a product called "Wheatina." I don't remember ever
having semolina.
You just beat me to it.

"Wheat, wheat, wheat, Wheatena!"
Ken Blake
2019-12-04 23:46:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Wed, 4 Dec 2019 22:12:52 +0100, Tristan Miller
Post by Tristan Miller
Greetings.
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by Stefan Ram
German web pages often explain that porridge is a food
popular in England, so I was surprised when I heard a
Russian teacher say in a video (explaining «????»): "I know
that English-speaking people don't say 'porridge' anymore.".
|does anyone actually use the word porridge outside of fairy tales?
. But I still think that what the the Russian teacher said is
exaggerated (or maybe she was referring to the American use?).
I'm sure that in England people still use "porridge" when
appropriate.
When I was a child, "porridge" was the standard. I don't recall ever
hearing "oatmeal". It may have changed.
What terms do/did you use when you need to differentiate between
different kinds of porridge, such as that made from oats versus that
made from farina/semolina?
I don't recall having anything else but oats as far a "porridge" goes.
What else would have been on the market in the late 1940s and early
1950s? I never heard of having farina or semolina when I was a child.
When I was a child, my mother sometimes made oatmeal for me, sometimes
farina, and sometimes a product called "Wheatina." I don't remember ever
having semolina.
You just beat me to it.
"Wheat, wheat, wheat, Wheatena!"
You didn't say you were correcting my spelling, but I thank you for it
anyway. "Wheatena" looks much better than my "wheatina." You're almost
certainly right.
--
Ken
Mack A. Damia
2019-12-05 00:12:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Wed, 4 Dec 2019 22:12:52 +0100, Tristan Miller
Post by Tristan Miller
Greetings.
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by Stefan Ram
German web pages often explain that porridge is a food
popular in England, so I was surprised when I heard a
Russian teacher say in a video (explaining «????»): "I know
that English-speaking people don't say 'porridge' anymore.".
|does anyone actually use the word porridge outside of fairy tales?
. But I still think that what the the Russian teacher said is
exaggerated (or maybe she was referring to the American use?).
I'm sure that in England people still use "porridge" when
appropriate.
When I was a child, "porridge" was the standard. I don't recall ever
hearing "oatmeal". It may have changed.
What terms do/did you use when you need to differentiate between
different kinds of porridge, such as that made from oats versus that
made from farina/semolina?
I don't recall having anything else but oats as far a "porridge" goes.
What else would have been on the market in the late 1940s and early
1950s? I never heard of having farina or semolina when I was a child.
When I was a child, my mother sometimes made oatmeal for me, sometimes
farina, and sometimes a product called "Wheatina." I don't remember ever
having semolina.
You just beat me to it.
"Wheat, wheat, wheat, Wheatena!"
You didn't say you were correcting my spelling, but I thank you for it
anyway. "Wheatena" looks much better than my "wheatina." You're almost
certainly right.
I never noticed it, M8E. I make mistakes, too.
Lotte Rieh
2019-12-04 22:43:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Wed, 4 Dec 2019 22:12:52 +0100, Tristan Miller
Post by Tristan Miller
Post by Mack A. Damia
When I was a child, "porridge" was the standard. I don't recall ever
hearing "oatmeal". It may have changed.
What terms do/did you use when you need to differentiate between
different kinds of porridge, such as that made from oats versus that
made from farina/semolina?
I don't recall having anything else but oats as far a "porridge" goes.
What else would have been on the market in the late 1940s and early
1950s? I never heard of having farina or semolina when I was a child.
I learned the term "farina" from Spike Jones' "Carmen Murdered" (1953):

| - I can not marry you, my Don
| 'Cause I'm in love with another one
| He fights the bull in the arena
|
| - I could do that if I ate Farina
|
| - Oh, no, you couldn't
| - Oh, yes, I could

<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cream_of_Wheat> shows an ad from 1895.

It was common in Germany since I'm a child, and I'm sure long before
that, but not particularly as a breakfast food. It was dessert, or a
meal for children. Or you could make it into dumplings and put them in
soup.
--
Quinn C
My pronouns are they/them
(or other gender-neutral ones)
Tristan Miller
2019-12-05 08:02:13 UTC
Permalink
Greetings.
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by Tristan Miller
Post by Mack A. Damia
When I was a child, "porridge" was the standard. I don't recall ever
hearing "oatmeal". It may have changed.
What terms do/did you use when you need to differentiate between
different kinds of porridge, such as that made from oats versus that
made from farina/semolina?
I don't recall having anything else but oats as far a "porridge" goes.
What else would have been on the market in the late 1940s and early
1950s? I never heard of having farina or semolina when I was a child.
What side of the pond did you grow up on? In North America, you
probably would have had access to Nabisco's Cream of Wheat, which is a
semolina-based porridge. It's been produced continuously since the
1890s, though Wikipedia tells me the brand has changed hands several
times since then, and it's now marketed by B&G Foods. Grits is also
quite popular in some parts of North America; it's a porridge made from
cornmeal and I assume that in the 1940s and 1950s, as today, various
branded offerings were available.

Regards,
Tristan
--
=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-
Tristan Miller
Free Software developer, ferret herder, logologist
https://logological.org/
=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-
Peter T. Daniels
2019-12-05 15:51:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tristan Miller
What side of the pond did you grow up on? In North America, you
probably would have had access to Nabisco's Cream of Wheat, which is a
semolina-based porridge. It's been produced continuously since the
1890s, though Wikipedia tells me the brand has changed hands several
times since then, and it's now marketed by B&G Foods. Grits is also
quite popular in some parts of North America; it's a porridge made from
cornmeal and I assume that in the 1940s and 1950s, as today, various
branded offerings were available.
I've tried grits several times. I have never consumed the entire
portion that had been placed on my plate. I keep thinking there
must be a way to prepare it that's palatable, but so far none has
emerged.
Janet
2019-12-05 12:54:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Wed, 4 Dec 2019 22:12:52 +0100, Tristan Miller
Post by Tristan Miller
Greetings.
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by Stefan Ram
German web pages often explain that porridge is a food
popular in England, so I was surprised when I heard a
Russian teacher say in a video (explaining «????»): "I know
that English-speaking people don't say 'porridge' anymore.".
|does anyone actually use the word porridge outside of fairy tales?
. But I still think that what the the Russian teacher said is
exaggerated (or maybe she was referring to the American use?).
I'm sure that in England people still use "porridge" when
appropriate.
When I was a child, "porridge" was the standard. I don't recall ever
hearing "oatmeal". It may have changed.
What terms do/did you use when you need to differentiate between
different kinds of porridge, such as that made from oats versus that
made from farina/semolina?
I don't recall having anything else but oats as far a "porridge" goes.
What else would have been on the market in the late 1940s and early
1950s? I never heard of having farina or semolina when I was a child.
Our school dinners included four different milk puddings,
respectively made with sago, tapioca, rice and semolina. We loathed the
slimy sago and tapioca ( "frogspawn") kinds and fought to get the skin
on yummy rice pudding.

My mother made much better rice and semolina puddings for us at home.
Rice pudding is sweet creamy and buttery with a lovely golden skin.
Semolinia was always served with a spoonful of red jam which you could
slowly stir in to turn it pink. I fed my kids home made semolina and
rice puddings (cheap and nutritious) and I still make rice pudding for
the grandkids.


Janet
Peter T. Daniels
2019-12-05 15:57:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by Janet
Our school dinners included four different milk puddings,
respectively made with sago, tapioca, rice and semolina. We loathed the
slimy sago and tapioca ( "frogspawn") kinds and fought to get the skin
on yummy rice pudding.
My mother made much better rice and semolina puddings for us at home.
Rice pudding is sweet creamy and buttery with a lovely golden skin.
Semolinia was always served with a spoonful of red jam which you could
slowly stir in to turn it pink. I fed my kids home made semolina and
rice puddings (cheap and nutritious) and I still make rice pudding for
the grandkids.
Rice pudding is a ubiquitous diner dessert.

I wonder whether you have diner-style restaurants.
charles
2019-12-05 17:11:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Janet
Our school dinners included four different milk puddings,
respectively made with sago, tapioca, rice and semolina. We loathed the
slimy sago and tapioca ( "frogspawn") kinds and fought to get the skin
on yummy rice pudding.
My mother made much better rice and semolina puddings for us at home.
Rice pudding is sweet creamy and buttery with a lovely golden skin.
Semolinia was always served with a spoonful of red jam which you could
slowly stir in to turn it pink. I fed my kids home made semolina and
rice puddings (cheap and nutritious) and I still make rice pudding for
the grandkids.
Rice pudding is a ubiquitous diner dessert.
I wonder whether you have diner-style restaurants.
In the 1950s, it was also a standard 'school pudding'. My mother used to
make it, too, but it tasted rather different.
--
from KT24 in Surrey, England
"I'd rather die of exhaustion than die of boredom" Thomas Carlyle
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2019-12-05 17:26:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by charles
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Janet
Our school dinners included four different milk puddings,
respectively made with sago, tapioca, rice and semolina. We loathed the
slimy sago and tapioca ( "frogspawn") kinds and fought to get the skin
on yummy rice pudding.
My mother made much better rice and semolina puddings for us at home.
Rice pudding is sweet creamy and buttery with a lovely golden skin.
Semolinia was always served with a spoonful of red jam which you could
slowly stir in to turn it pink. I fed my kids home made semolina and
rice puddings (cheap and nutritious) and I still make rice pudding for
the grandkids.
Rice pudding is a ubiquitous diner dessert.
I wonder whether you have diner-style restaurants.
In the 1950s, it was also a standard 'school pudding'. My mother used to
make it, too, but it tasted rather different.
At the school I attended before 1966 (now defunct because the person
entrusted with the bank account ran away with the secretary and all the
money) we had a choice each day between rice pudding and something
else. If the something else was something I liked I chose it; otherwise
I chose rice pudding. The problem was that sometimes "rice pudding" was
announced when it was actually tapioca, which was vile.
--
athel
s***@gowanhill.com
2019-12-04 21:37:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tristan Miller
What terms do/did you use when you need to differentiate between
different kinds of porridge, such as that made from oats versus that
made from farina/semolina?
When I was a lad (WIWAL) semolina was a sweet pudding for after dinner, not a breakfast dish.

Owain
Peter T. Daniels
2019-12-04 22:15:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by s***@gowanhill.com
Post by Tristan Miller
What terms do/did you use when you need to differentiate between
different kinds of porridge, such as that made from oats versus that
made from farina/semolina?
When I was a lad (WIWAL) semolina was a sweet pudding for after dinner, not a breakfast dish.
Farina was a flavorless white hot cereal that my mother would make once
in a while over my objections. (My favorite hot cereal was the one with
speckles -- I think it may have been Ralston Purina.) Semolina was a
kind of wheat (flour?) that went into pasta, but not the name of a dessert.

I guess oatmeal was my second-favorite.
HVS
2019-12-04 23:20:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by s***@gowanhill.com
Post by Tristan Miller
What terms do/did you use when you need to differentiate between
different kinds of porridge, such as that made from oats versus that
made from farina/semolina?
When I was a lad (WIWAL) semolina was a sweet pudding for after dinner, not a breakfast dish.
+1

Cheers, Harvey
Mack A. Damia
2019-12-05 00:14:15 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 04 Dec 2019 23:20:29 +0000, HVS
Post by s***@gowanhill.com
Post by s***@gowanhill.com
Post by Tristan Miller
What terms do/did you use when you need to differentiate between
different kinds of porridge, such as that made from oats versus
that
Post by s***@gowanhill.com
Post by Tristan Miller
made from farina/semolina?
When I was a lad (WIWAL) semolina was a sweet pudding for after
dinner, not a breakfast dish.
+1
I remember tapioca pudding. Always reminded me of tadpole eggs.
Katy Jennison
2019-12-05 02:53:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mack A. Damia
I remember tapioca pudding. Always reminded me of tadpole eggs.
Yes -- at school we all called it frogspawn.
--
Katy Jennison
Tony Cooper
2019-12-05 03:07:08 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 5 Dec 2019 02:53:27 +0000, Katy Jennison
Post by Katy Jennison
Post by Mack A. Damia
I remember tapioca pudding. Always reminded me of tadpole eggs.
Yes -- at school we all called it frogspawn.
Y'all talk like tapioca is something no longer eaten. I like it, and
my wife often buys it for me. She doesn't make it from scratch,
though. The deli department at the supermarket has pre-made tapioca.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Mack A. Damia
2019-12-05 04:15:49 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 04 Dec 2019 22:07:08 -0500, Tony Cooper
Post by Tony Cooper
On Thu, 5 Dec 2019 02:53:27 +0000, Katy Jennison
Post by Katy Jennison
Post by Mack A. Damia
I remember tapioca pudding. Always reminded me of tadpole eggs.
Yes -- at school we all called it frogspawn.
Y'all talk like tapioca is something no longer eaten. I like it, and
my wife often buys it for me. She doesn't make it from scratch,
though. The deli department at the supermarket has pre-made tapioca.
I don't remember how it tasted, and I wager that I haven't had it for
over sixty years. Maybe Katy, too, but I am referring to school
dinners in England - in the early 1950s for me. Dinners eaten at
noon.

Horrible food! Wilted cabbage that had been cooked far too long. I
have vague flashbacks of nasty tastes in my mouth. The custard was
simply awful! Tapioca pudding, too. I refused to eat most of the
food, and they would make me sit there forever, and I would seriously
cry. I think my parents got in on this problem, but I don't recall
what the outcome was. We emigrated in 1954.
phil
2019-12-05 10:55:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by Katy Jennison
I remember tapioca pudding.  Always reminded me of tadpole eggs.
Yes -- at school we all called it frogspawn.
Now that reminds me -- for me that description applied to sago pudding.
A while back, I went looking for sago to recreate the school pudding,
but had some difficulty finding it. Eventually I found 'sago pearls',
but made not from sago palm but from tapioca. So the frogspawn that we
had, although we called it sago, was probably made from tapioca.

All together now --

How do you start a pudding race?
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2019-12-05 12:38:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by phil
Post by Katy Jennison
I remember tapioca pudding.  Always reminded me of tadpole eggs.
Yes -- at school we all called it frogspawn.
Now that reminds me -- for me that description applied to sago pudding.
A while back, I went looking for sago to recreate the school pudding,
but had some difficulty finding it. Eventually I found 'sago pearls',
but made not from sago palm but from tapioca. So the frogspawn that we
had, although we called it sago, was probably made from tapioca.
Maybe, but the sago we had was nowhere near as nasty as the tapioca.
Post by phil
All together now --
How do you start a pudding race?
--
athel
Peter T. Daniels
2019-12-05 15:56:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Maybe, but the sago we had was nowhere near as nasty as the tapioca.
Have you encountered the faddish "beverage" bubble tea? It seems to
have entered NY via Vietnamese restaurants: it's iced tea with pearls
of tapioca in it. It was served with a wider-than-usual straw, but the
straw was still just too narrow for the expanded beads to be sucked up.
They added nothing but a chewy texture to the beverage.

And now it's everywhere.

I like tapioca pudding, but making it from the dried tapioca beads
which is how it's sold takes forever.
Peter Young
2019-12-05 16:23:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by phil
Post by Katy Jennison
I remember tapioca pudding.  Always reminded me of tadpole eggs.
Yes -- at school we all called it frogspawn.
Now that reminds me -- for me that description applied to sago pudding.
A while back, I went looking for sago to recreate the school pudding,
but had some difficulty finding it. Eventually I found 'sago pearls',
but made not from sago palm but from tapioca. So the frogspawn that we
had, although we called it sago, was probably made from tapioca.
All together now --
How do you start a pudding race?
Say "Go". Any fule know that.

Peter.
--
Peter Young, (BrE, RP), Consultant Anaesthetist, 1975-2004.
(US equivalent: Certified Anesthesiologist) (AUE Hg)
Cheltenham and Gloucester, UK. Now happily retired.
http://pnyoung.orpheusweb.co.uk
CDB
2019-12-05 11:10:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by s***@gowanhill.com
Post by s***@gowanhill.com
Post by Tristan Miller
What terms do/did you use when you need to differentiate between
different kinds of porridge, such as that made from oats versus
that
Post by s***@gowanhill.com
Post by Tristan Miller
made from farina/semolina?
When I was a lad (WIWAL) semolina was a sweet pudding for after
dinner, not a breakfast dish.
+1
We had it for breakfast occasionally, as a change from (oatmeal)
porridge. We called it by its brand name, "Cream of Wheat". I was
willing to eat it if there was brown sugar.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cream_of_Wheat
b***@shaw.ca
2019-12-05 02:06:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tristan Miller
Greetings.
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by Stefan Ram
German web pages often explain that porridge is a food
popular in England, so I was surprised when I heard a
Russian teacher say in a video (explaining «????»): "I know
that English-speaking people don't say 'porridge' anymore.".
|does anyone actually use the word porridge outside of fairy tales?
. But I still think that what the the Russian teacher said is
exaggerated (or maybe she was referring to the American use?).
I'm sure that in England people still use "porridge" when
appropriate.
When I was a child, "porridge" was the standard. I don't recall ever
hearing "oatmeal". It may have changed.
What terms do/did you use when you need to differentiate between
different kinds of porridge, such as that made from oats versus that
made from farina/semolina?
Hot breakfast cereal made from certain plants is porridge. As Wikipedia puts it:

"Porridge (historically also spelled porage, porrige, or parritch) is a food commonly eaten as a breakfast cereal dish, made by boiling ground, crushed or chopped starchy plants—typically grain—in water or milk."

To specify the type of porridge, give it an adjective: Oatmeal porridge, cornmeal porridge, barley porridge, etc.

bill
Peter Young
2019-12-04 21:02:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by Stefan Ram
German web pages often explain that porridge is a food
popular in England, so I was surprised when I heard a
Russian teacher say in a video (explaining «????»): "I know
that English-speaking people don't say 'porridge' anymore.".
|does anyone actually use the word porridge outside of fairy tales?
. But I still think that what the the Russian teacher said is
exaggerated (or maybe she was referring to the American use?).
I'm sure that in England people still use "porridge" when
appropriate.
When I was a child, "porridge" was the standard. I don't recall ever
hearing "oatmeal". It may have changed.
I think it has, at least in Leftpondia. When I was recently in a B&B in
the Laurentian Mountains in Quebec with my brother, s.i.l and my f.w.i.a.l
I had what the proprietor called "oatmeal" with my breakfast. He did say
to me "you might call it porridge". It seems that the name is a bit
transpondial.

Peter.
--
Peter Young, (BrE, RP), Consultant Anaesthetist, 1975-2004.
(US equivalent: Certified Anesthesiologist) (AUE Hg)
Cheltenham and Gloucester, UK. Now happily retired.
http://pnyoung.orpheusweb.co.uk
Mack A. Damia
2019-12-04 21:41:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Young
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by Stefan Ram
German web pages often explain that porridge is a food
popular in England, so I was surprised when I heard a
Russian teacher say in a video (explaining «????»): "I know
that English-speaking people don't say 'porridge' anymore.".
|does anyone actually use the word porridge outside of fairy tales?
. But I still think that what the the Russian teacher said is
exaggerated (or maybe she was referring to the American use?).
I'm sure that in England people still use "porridge" when
appropriate.
When I was a child, "porridge" was the standard. I don't recall ever
hearing "oatmeal". It may have changed.
I think it has, at least in Leftpondia. When I was recently in a B&B in
the Laurentian Mountains in Quebec with my brother, s.i.l and my f.w.i.a.l
I had what the proprietor called "oatmeal" with my breakfast. He did say
to me "you might call it porridge". It seems that the name is a bit
transpondial.
"Porridge" was the standard name for boiled rolled oats when I was a
child in England in the late 1940s and early to mid 1950s. It was
never called porridge in the USA to my knowledge, and I suppose
Canada. Hard to say, though. It was always "oatmeal", and I think
if you ever asked for porridge in a diner in the USA, you'd get a
puzzled look.
Tony Cooper
2019-12-04 22:06:29 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 04 Dec 2019 13:41:00 -0800, Mack A. Damia
Post by Mack A. Damia
"Porridge" was the standard name for boiled rolled oats when I was a
child in England in the late 1940s and early to mid 1950s. It was
never called porridge in the USA to my knowledge,
True, but many American children sang:

Pease porridge hot, pease porridge cold,
Pease porridge in the pot, nine days old;
Some like it hot, some like it cold,
Some like it in the pot, nine days old.

My grandmother used to say "If you can't say porridge, say pease"

For the life of me, I can't remember why she said that or what it
meant.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Tony Cooper
2019-12-04 22:11:59 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 04 Dec 2019 17:06:29 -0500, Tony Cooper
Post by Tony Cooper
On Wed, 04 Dec 2019 13:41:00 -0800, Mack A. Damia
Post by Mack A. Damia
"Porridge" was the standard name for boiled rolled oats when I was a
child in England in the late 1940s and early to mid 1950s. It was
never called porridge in the USA to my knowledge,
Pease porridge hot, pease porridge cold,
Pease porridge in the pot, nine days old;
Some like it hot, some like it cold,
Some like it in the pot, nine days old.
My grandmother used to say "If you can't say porridge, say pease"
For the life of me, I can't remember why she said that or what it
meant.
I hit "Send" before I added that she served me "Cream of Wheat" for
breakfast when I stayed overnight at my grandparent's house. To the
best of my memory, it was very much like oatmeal. She made it more
palatable by sprinkling brown sugar on top.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Mack A. Damia
2019-12-04 22:19:55 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 04 Dec 2019 17:11:59 -0500, Tony Cooper
Post by Tony Cooper
On Wed, 04 Dec 2019 17:06:29 -0500, Tony Cooper
Post by Tony Cooper
On Wed, 04 Dec 2019 13:41:00 -0800, Mack A. Damia
Post by Mack A. Damia
"Porridge" was the standard name for boiled rolled oats when I was a
child in England in the late 1940s and early to mid 1950s. It was
never called porridge in the USA to my knowledge,
Pease porridge hot, pease porridge cold,
Pease porridge in the pot, nine days old;
Some like it hot, some like it cold,
Some like it in the pot, nine days old.
My grandmother used to say "If you can't say porridge, say pease"
For the life of me, I can't remember why she said that or what it
meant.
I hit "Send" before I added that she served me "Cream of Wheat" for
breakfast when I stayed overnight at my grandparent's house. To the
best of my memory, it was very much like oatmeal. She made it more
palatable by sprinkling brown sugar on top.
"I want my Maypo!"
Peter T. Daniels
2019-12-04 22:27:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Wed, 04 Dec 2019 17:11:59 -0500, Tony Cooper
Post by Tony Cooper
I hit "Send" before I added that she served me "Cream of Wheat" for
breakfast when I stayed overnight at my grandparent's house. To the
best of my memory, it was very much like oatmeal. She made it more
palatable by sprinkling brown sugar on top.
Essentially the same as farina, maybe a slightly less smooth texture.
Post by Mack A. Damia
"I want my Maypo!"
Ugh. That stuff was awful.
Mack A. Damia
2019-12-04 23:02:52 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 4 Dec 2019 14:27:59 -0800 (PST), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Wed, 04 Dec 2019 17:11:59 -0500, Tony Cooper
Post by Tony Cooper
I hit "Send" before I added that she served me "Cream of Wheat" for
breakfast when I stayed overnight at my grandparent's house. To the
best of my memory, it was very much like oatmeal. She made it more
palatable by sprinkling brown sugar on top.
Essentially the same as farina, maybe a slightly less smooth texture.
Post by Mack A. Damia
"I want my Maypo!"
Ugh. That stuff was awful.
Truly I tell you that I never had it! But I remember the commercial
with the little kid.
Ken Blake
2019-12-04 22:33:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Wed, 04 Dec 2019 17:11:59 -0500, Tony Cooper
Post by Tony Cooper
On Wed, 04 Dec 2019 17:06:29 -0500, Tony Cooper
Post by Tony Cooper
On Wed, 04 Dec 2019 13:41:00 -0800, Mack A. Damia
Post by Mack A. Damia
"Porridge" was the standard name for boiled rolled oats when I was a
child in England in the late 1940s and early to mid 1950s. It was
never called porridge in the USA to my knowledge,
Pease porridge hot, pease porridge cold,
Pease porridge in the pot, nine days old;
Some like it hot, some like it cold,
Some like it in the pot, nine days old.
My grandmother used to say "If you can't say porridge, say pease"
For the life of me, I can't remember why she said that or what it
meant.
I hit "Send" before I added that she served me "Cream of Wheat" for
breakfast when I stayed overnight at my grandparent's house. To the
best of my memory, it was very much like oatmeal. She made it more
palatable by sprinkling brown sugar on top.
"I want my Maypo!"
That's a name that I knew. But I don't remember ever having it.
--
Ken
Mack A. Damia
2019-12-04 23:04:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Wed, 04 Dec 2019 17:11:59 -0500, Tony Cooper
Post by Tony Cooper
On Wed, 04 Dec 2019 17:06:29 -0500, Tony Cooper
Post by Tony Cooper
On Wed, 04 Dec 2019 13:41:00 -0800, Mack A. Damia
Post by Mack A. Damia
"Porridge" was the standard name for boiled rolled oats when I was a
child in England in the late 1940s and early to mid 1950s. It was
never called porridge in the USA to my knowledge,
Pease porridge hot, pease porridge cold,
Pease porridge in the pot, nine days old;
Some like it hot, some like it cold,
Some like it in the pot, nine days old.
My grandmother used to say "If you can't say porridge, say pease"
For the life of me, I can't remember why she said that or what it
meant.
I hit "Send" before I added that she served me "Cream of Wheat" for
breakfast when I stayed overnight at my grandparent's house. To the
best of my memory, it was very much like oatmeal. She made it more
palatable by sprinkling brown sugar on top.
"I want my Maypo!"
That's a name that I knew. But I don't remember ever having it.
"Wheat, wheat, wheat Wheatena!"
Ken Blake
2019-12-04 22:32:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tony Cooper
On Wed, 04 Dec 2019 17:06:29 -0500, Tony Cooper
Post by Tony Cooper
On Wed, 04 Dec 2019 13:41:00 -0800, Mack A. Damia
Post by Mack A. Damia
"Porridge" was the standard name for boiled rolled oats when I was a
child in England in the late 1940s and early to mid 1950s. It was
never called porridge in the USA to my knowledge,
Pease porridge hot, pease porridge cold,
Pease porridge in the pot, nine days old;
Some like it hot, some like it cold,
Some like it in the pot, nine days old.
My grandmother used to say "If you can't say porridge, say pease"
For the life of me, I can't remember why she said that or what it
meant.
I hit "Send" before I added that she served me "Cream of Wheat" for
breakfast when I stayed overnight at my grandparent's house. To the
best of my memory, it was very much like oatmeal. She made it more
palatable by sprinkling brown sugar on top.
I mentioned that besides oatmeal, I used to have farina and wheatina as
a child. I forgot that I also used to sometimes have cream of wheat.
--
Ken
Peter T. Daniels
2019-12-04 22:16:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tony Cooper
On Wed, 04 Dec 2019 13:41:00 -0800, Mack A. Damia
Post by Mack A. Damia
"Porridge" was the standard name for boiled rolled oats when I was a
child in England in the late 1940s and early to mid 1950s. It was
never called porridge in the USA to my knowledge,
Pease porridge hot, pease porridge cold,
Pease porridge in the pot, nine days old;
Some like it hot, some like it cold,
Some like it in the pot, nine days old.
My grandmother used to say "If you can't say porridge, say pease"
For the life of me, I can't remember why she said that or what it
meant.
Whatever porridge was, that song told us it was made of peas.
Richard Heathfield
2019-12-04 22:27:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tony Cooper
On Wed, 04 Dec 2019 13:41:00 -0800, Mack A. Damia
Post by Mack A. Damia
"Porridge" was the standard name for boiled rolled oats when I was a
child in England in the late 1940s and early to mid 1950s. It was
never called porridge in the USA to my knowledge,
Pease porridge hot, pease porridge cold,
Pease porridge in the pot, nine days old;
Some like it hot, some like it cold,
Some like it in the pot, nine days old.
My grandmother used to say "If you can't say porridge, say pease"
For the life of me, I can't remember why she said that or what it
meant.
Probably a manners reminder (similar to "Ps and Qs").
--
Richard Heathfield
Email: rjh at cpax dot org dot uk
"Usenet is a strange place" - dmr 29 July 1999
Sig line 4 vacant - apply within
Ken Blake
2019-12-04 22:30:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tony Cooper
On Wed, 04 Dec 2019 13:41:00 -0800, Mack A. Damia
Post by Mack A. Damia
"Porridge" was the standard name for boiled rolled oats when I was a
child in England in the late 1940s and early to mid 1950s. It was
never called porridge in the USA to my knowledge,
Pease porridge hot, pease porridge cold,
Pease porridge in the pot, nine days old;
Some like it hot, some like it cold,
Some like it in the pot, nine days old.
Yes, I had forgotten about that. I used to sing it as a child too.

That's another kind of porridge, and what I just said in another post
was wrong--I learned the British term "porridge" way before I saw it in
British literature.
--
Ken
Peter Young
2019-12-05 07:30:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tony Cooper
On Wed, 04 Dec 2019 13:41:00 -0800, Mack A. Damia
Post by Mack A. Damia
"Porridge" was the standard name for boiled rolled oats when I was a
child in England in the late 1940s and early to mid 1950s. It was
never called porridge in the USA to my knowledge,
Pease porridge hot, pease porridge cold,
Pease porridge in the pot, nine days old;
Some like it hot, some like it cold,
Some like it in the pot, nine days old.
Here it's "pease pottage", a kind of vegetable stew.

ObAUE: Near to Gatwick Airport there's a village called "Pease Pottage".

Peter.
--
Peter Young, (BrE, RP), Consultant Anaesthetist, 1975-2004.
(US equivalent: Certified Anesthesiologist) (AUE Hg)
Cheltenham and Gloucester, UK. Now happily retired.
http://pnyoung.orpheusweb.co.uk
Lewis
2019-12-05 11:33:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Young
Post by Tony Cooper
On Wed, 04 Dec 2019 13:41:00 -0800, Mack A. Damia
Post by Mack A. Damia
"Porridge" was the standard name for boiled rolled oats when I was a
child in England in the late 1940s and early to mid 1950s. It was
never called porridge in the USA to my knowledge,
In what century?
Post by Peter Young
Here it's "pease pottage", a kind of vegetable stew.
That's a new one for me.
--
The wages of sin is death, but so is the salary of virtue, and at
least the evil get to go home early on Fridays. --Witches Abroad
Peter T. Daniels
2019-12-05 15:48:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Young
Post by Tony Cooper
On Wed, 04 Dec 2019 13:41:00 -0800, Mack A. Damia
Post by Mack A. Damia
"Porridge" was the standard name for boiled rolled oats when I was a
child in England in the late 1940s and early to mid 1950s. It was
never called porridge in the USA to my knowledge,
Pease porridge hot, pease porridge cold,
Pease porridge in the pot, nine days old;
Some like it hot, some like it cold,
Some like it in the pot, nine days old.
Here it's "pease pottage", a kind of vegetable stew.
ObAUE: Near to Gatwick Airport there's a village called "Pease Pottage".
"Pottage" is what one sells one's birthright for. Otherwise unknown
(and not understood). Some recent versions have "a bowl of lentil
stew," which may be more accurate but is less evocative.
Peter Young
2019-12-05 16:22:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Peter Young
Post by Tony Cooper
On Wed, 04 Dec 2019 13:41:00 -0800, Mack A. Damia
Post by Mack A. Damia
"Porridge" was the standard name for boiled rolled oats when I was a
child in England in the late 1940s and early to mid 1950s. It was
never called porridge in the USA to my knowledge,
Pease porridge hot, pease porridge cold,
Pease porridge in the pot, nine days old;
Some like it hot, some like it cold,
Some like it in the pot, nine days old.
Here it's "pease pottage", a kind of vegetable stew.
ObAUE: Near to Gatwick Airport there's a village called "Pease Pottage".
"Pottage" is what one sells one's birthright for. Otherwise unknown
(and not understood). Some recent versions have "a bowl of lentil
stew," which may be more accurate but is less evocative.
Pottage is a standard, if a bit archaic, word in BrE. Here "pease
porridge" would be nonsense.

Peter.
--
Peter Young, (BrE, RP), Consultant Anaesthetist, 1975-2004.
(US equivalent: Certified Anesthesiologist) (AUE Hg)
Cheltenham and Gloucester, UK. Now happily retired.
http://pnyoung.orpheusweb.co.uk
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2019-12-05 16:47:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Young
Post by Tony Cooper
On Wed, 04 Dec 2019 13:41:00 -0800, Mack A. Damia
Post by Mack A. Damia
"Porridge" was the standard name for boiled rolled oats when I was a
child in England in the late 1940s and early to mid 1950s. It was
never called porridge in the USA to my knowledge,
Pease porridge hot, pease porridge cold,
Pease porridge in the pot, nine days old;
Some like it hot, some like it cold,
Some like it in the pot, nine days old.
Here it's "pease pottage", a kind of vegetable stew.
"pease" is an archaic plural of "pea". It lives on in "pease pottage"
and "pease pudding".
https://www.lexico.com/en/definition/pease_pudding

pease pudding
noun
mass noun British

A dish of split peas boiled with onion and carrot and mashed to a
pulp.

According to the Wikip entry for the village of Pease Pottage:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pease_Pottage

Pease Pottage is also an old name for pease pudding.
Post by Peter Young
ObAUE: Near to Gatwick Airport there's a village called "Pease Pottage".
Peter.
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Peter Moylan
2019-12-05 11:22:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tony Cooper
On Wed, 04 Dec 2019 13:41:00 -0800, Mack A. Damia
Post by Mack A. Damia
"Porridge" was the standard name for boiled rolled oats when I was a
child in England in the late 1940s and early to mid 1950s. It was
never called porridge in the USA to my knowledge,
Pease porridge hot, pease porridge cold,
Pease porridge in the pot, nine days old;
Some like it hot, some like it cold,
Some like it in the pot, nine days old.
Yes, but pease porridge wasn't like today's porridge. If I have
understood the term correctly, it's what we would now call pea soup.
Post by Tony Cooper
My grandmother used to say "If you can't say porridge, say pease"
For the life of me, I can't remember why she said that or what it
meant.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Ken Blake
2019-12-04 22:28:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by Peter Young
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by Stefan Ram
German web pages often explain that porridge is a food
popular in England, so I was surprised when I heard a
Russian teacher say in a video (explaining «????»): "I know
that English-speaking people don't say 'porridge' anymore.".
|does anyone actually use the word porridge outside of fairy tales?
. But I still think that what the the Russian teacher said is
exaggerated (or maybe she was referring to the American use?).
I'm sure that in England people still use "porridge" when
appropriate.
When I was a child, "porridge" was the standard. I don't recall ever
hearing "oatmeal". It may have changed.
I think it has, at least in Leftpondia. When I was recently in a B&B in
the Laurentian Mountains in Quebec with my brother, s.i.l and my f.w.i.a.l
I had what the proprietor called "oatmeal" with my breakfast. He did say
to me "you might call it porridge". It seems that the name is a bit
transpondial.
"Porridge" was the standard name for boiled rolled oats when I was a
child in England in the late 1940s and early to mid 1950s. It was
never called porridge in the USA to my knowledge, and I suppose
Canada. Hard to say, though. It was always "oatmeal", and I think
if you ever asked for porridge in a diner in the USA, you'd get a
puzzled look.
I think you're right. I only know the word "porridge" from British
literature. I never heard it in the US.
--
Ken
Garrett Wollman
2019-12-04 22:37:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ken Blake
I think you're right. I only know the word "porridge" from British
literature. I never heard it in the US.
I'll second that, as a child of the 1970s it was always called "hot
cereal". In fact, when Quaker Oats came out with "instant oatmeal",
they commissioned a jingle: "We're gonna make a / hot cereal lover out
of you / with Quaker instant oatmeal".

"Instant oatmeal" is rolled oats that have been ground up more finely
than "quick-cooking" rolled oats so that they can be reconstituted
using hot (not boiling) water from a coffeemaker in a few seconds --
generally also flavored and sweetened. (I only buy "Old Fashioned"
rolled oats, which are the normal kind, as invented in the 19th
century, because that's what all my baking recipes call for; I don't
eat breakfast so I don't have any use for breakfast cereal whether hot
or cold.)

-GAWollman
--
Garrett A. Wollman | "Act to avoid constraining the future; if you can,
***@bimajority.org| act to remove constraint from the future. This is
Opinions not shared by| a thing you can do, are able to do, to do together."
my employers. | - Graydon Saunders, _A Succession of Bad Days_ (2015)
Quinn C
2019-12-04 22:51:51 UTC
Permalink
Post by Garrett Wollman
"Instant oatmeal" is rolled oats that have been ground up more finely
than "quick-cooking" rolled oats so that they can be reconstituted
using hot (not boiling) water from a coffeemaker in a few seconds --
generally also flavored and sweetened. (I only buy "Old Fashioned"
rolled oats, which are the normal kind, as invented in the 19th
century, because that's what all my baking recipes call for; I don't
eat breakfast so I don't have any use for breakfast cereal whether hot
or cold.)
I make oatmeal from "Old Fashioned" rolled oats. It just takes a bit
longer. And as discussed before, even that is perfectly fine to eat as
a cold cereal, without cooking.
--
It is now widely accepted amongst those who have given thought
to the problem of Germany ... that the world has not a normal,
rational people to deal with, but a nation suffering from an
acute attack of homicidal mania -- E.O.Lorimer
Janet
2019-12-05 12:30:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by Quinn C
Post by Garrett Wollman
"Instant oatmeal" is rolled oats that have been ground up more finely
than "quick-cooking" rolled oats so that they can be reconstituted
using hot (not boiling) water from a coffeemaker in a few seconds --
generally also flavored and sweetened. (I only buy "Old Fashioned"
rolled oats, which are the normal kind, as invented in the 19th
century, because that's what all my baking recipes call for; I don't
eat breakfast so I don't have any use for breakfast cereal whether hot
or cold.)
I make oatmeal from "Old Fashioned" rolled oats. It just takes a bit
longer. And as discussed before, even that is perfectly fine to eat as
a cold cereal, without cooking.
Cold but not raw. Rolled oats (like Quaker) are steamed before they
were rolled.

https://wholegrainscouncil.org/whole-grains-101/easy-ways-enjoy-
whole-grains/grain-month-calendar/oats-%E2%80%93-january-grain-
month/types

Janet.
Quinn C
2019-12-05 13:54:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by Janet
Post by Quinn C
Post by Garrett Wollman
"Instant oatmeal" is rolled oats that have been ground up more finely
than "quick-cooking" rolled oats so that they can be reconstituted
using hot (not boiling) water from a coffeemaker in a few seconds --
generally also flavored and sweetened. (I only buy "Old Fashioned"
rolled oats, which are the normal kind, as invented in the 19th
century, because that's what all my baking recipes call for; I don't
eat breakfast so I don't have any use for breakfast cereal whether hot
or cold.)
I make oatmeal from "Old Fashioned" rolled oats. It just takes a bit
longer. And as discussed before, even that is perfectly fine to eat as
a cold cereal, without cooking.
Cold but not raw. Rolled oats (like Quaker) are steamed before they
were rolled.
You're right. I've read about that process before. And I don,t feel
like eating steel-cut oats as is.
Post by Janet
https://wholegrainscouncil.org/whole-grains-101/easy-ways-enjoy-
whole-grains/grain-month-calendar/oats-%E2%80%93-january-grain-
month/types
They wouldn't let me in because of a "spam firewall". That's absurd.
Visiting a Web page isn't spamming.
--
It is now widely accepted amongst those who have given thought
to the problem of Germany ... that the world has not a normal,
rational people to deal with, but a nation suffering from an
acute attack of homicidal mania -- E.O.Lorimer
Ross
2019-12-04 23:42:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by Peter Young
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by Stefan Ram
German web pages often explain that porridge is a food
popular in England, so I was surprised when I heard a
Russian teacher say in a video (explaining «????»): "I know
that English-speaking people don't say 'porridge' anymore.".
|does anyone actually use the word porridge outside of fairy tales?
. But I still think that what the the Russian teacher said is
exaggerated (or maybe she was referring to the American use?).
I'm sure that in England people still use "porridge" when
appropriate.
When I was a child, "porridge" was the standard. I don't recall ever
hearing "oatmeal". It may have changed.
I think it has, at least in Leftpondia. When I was recently in a B&B in
the Laurentian Mountains in Quebec with my brother, s.i.l and my f.w.i.a.l
I had what the proprietor called "oatmeal" with my breakfast. He did say
to me "you might call it porridge". It seems that the name is a bit
transpondial.
"Porridge" was the standard name for boiled rolled oats when I was a
child in England in the late 1940s and early to mid 1950s. It was
never called porridge in the USA to my knowledge, and I suppose
Canada.
Well, it was porridge in our family in Canada.
And still is in New Zealand.
b***@shaw.ca
2019-12-05 02:16:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ross
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by Peter Young
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by Stefan Ram
German web pages often explain that porridge is a food
popular in England, so I was surprised when I heard a
Russian teacher say in a video (explaining «????»): "I know
that English-speaking people don't say 'porridge' anymore.".
|does anyone actually use the word porridge outside of fairy tales?
. But I still think that what the the Russian teacher said is
exaggerated (or maybe she was referring to the American use?).
I'm sure that in England people still use "porridge" when
appropriate.
When I was a child, "porridge" was the standard. I don't recall ever
hearing "oatmeal". It may have changed.
I think it has, at least in Leftpondia. When I was recently in a B&B in
the Laurentian Mountains in Quebec with my brother, s.i.l and my f.w.i.a.l
I had what the proprietor called "oatmeal" with my breakfast. He did say
to me "you might call it porridge". It seems that the name is a bit
transpondial.
"Porridge" was the standard name for boiled rolled oats when I was a
child in England in the late 1940s and early to mid 1950s. It was
never called porridge in the USA to my knowledge, and I suppose
Canada.
Well, it was porridge in our family in Canada.
And still is in New Zealand.
It was porridge for me in Western Canada, but oatmeal wasn't the
only kind of porridge. But I'm sure Mack could have lived in
an area where oatmeal porridge was known as oatmeal.

bill
Richard Heathfield
2019-12-04 19:42:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by Stefan Ram
German web pages often explain that porridge is a food
popular in England, so I was surprised when I heard a
Russian teacher say in a video (explaining «каша»): "I know
that English-speaking people don't say 'porridge' anymore.".
The teacher was incorrect.
Post by Stefan Ram
|does anyone actually use the word porridge outside of fairy tales?
I found this on the Web:

"Invisible pink unicorns are real."

You can find pretty much anything on the Web if you try hard enough.
Post by Stefan Ram
. But I still think that what the the Russian teacher said is
exaggerated (or maybe she was referring to the American use?).
I'm sure that in England people still use "porridge" when
appropriate.
They do, yes.
--
Richard Heathfield
Email: rjh at cpax dot org dot uk
"Usenet is a strange place" - dmr 29 July 1999
Sig line 4 vacant - apply within
Sam Plusnet
2019-12-04 19:52:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by Stefan Ram
German web pages often explain that porridge is a food
popular in England, so I was surprised when I heard a
Russian teacher say in a video (explaining «каша»): "I know
that English-speaking people don't say 'porridge' anymore.".
|does anyone actually use the word porridge outside of fairy tales?
. But I still think that what the the Russian teacher said is
exaggerated (or maybe she was referring to the American use?).
I'm sure that in England people still use "porridge" when
appropriate.
True. In BrE "oatmeal" might be used to refer to a colour, but the
stuff people have for breakfast is "porridge".
--
Sam Plusnet
Spains Harden
2019-12-04 20:14:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Stefan Ram
German web pages often explain that porridge is a food
popular in England, so I was surprised when I heard a
Russian teacher say in a video (explaining «каша»): "I know
that English-speaking people don't say 'porridge' anymore.".
|does anyone actually use the word porridge outside of fairy tales?
. But I still think that what the the Russian teacher said is
exaggerated (or maybe she was referring to the American use?).
I'm sure that in England people still use "porridge" when
appropriate.
True. In BrE "oatmeal" might be used to refer to a colour, but the
stuff people have for breakfast is "porridge".
No it isn't. How is it that people who live on the other side of the
world seem to know more about us than we do ourselves?
Richard Heathfield
2019-12-04 20:30:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by Spains Harden
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Stefan Ram
German web pages often explain that porridge is a food
popular in England, so I was surprised when I heard a
Russian teacher say in a video (explaining «каша»): "I know
that English-speaking people don't say 'porridge' anymore.".
|does anyone actually use the word porridge outside of fairy tales?
. But I still think that what the the Russian teacher said is
exaggerated (or maybe she was referring to the American use?).
I'm sure that in England people still use "porridge" when
appropriate.
True. In BrE "oatmeal" might be used to refer to a colour, but the
stuff people have for breakfast is "porridge".
No it isn't.
Yes it is, for many of us.
Post by Spains Harden
How is it that people who live on the other side of the
world seem to know more about us than we do ourselves?
I live in the UK, and I call porridge "porridge". That you do not is
neither here nor there. There are people who do, and people who don't,
and you happen to be one of those people who don't. That doesn't mean
that none of us do.
--
Richard Heathfield
Email: rjh at cpax dot org dot uk
"Usenet is a strange place" - dmr 29 July 1999
Sig line 4 vacant - apply within
phil
2019-12-04 20:45:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by Richard Heathfield
Post by Spains Harden
    German web pages often explain that porridge is a food
    popular in England, so I was surprised when I heard a
    Russian teacher say in a video (explaining «каша»): "I know
    that English-speaking people don't say 'porridge' anymore.".
|does anyone actually use the word porridge outside of fairy tales?
    . But I still think that what the the Russian teacher said is
    exaggerated (or maybe she was referring to the American use?).
    I'm sure that in England people still use "porridge" when
    appropriate.
True.  In BrE "oatmeal" might be used to refer to a colour, but the
stuff people have for breakfast is "porridge".
No it isn't.
Yes it is, for many of us.
Post by Spains Harden
How is it that people who live on the other side of the
world seem to know more about us than we do ourselves?
I live in the UK, and I call porridge "porridge". That you do not is
neither here nor there. There are people who do, and people who don't,
and you happen to be one of those people who don't. That doesn't mean
that none of us do.
Me too. Here is some porridge (or indeed, porage):

<https://www.sainsburys.co.uk/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/gb/groceries/all-cereals/sainsburys-express-porridge-original-x10-sachets-270g>

Oatmeal would be the milled oats from which I could make porridge.
Peter Young
2019-12-04 21:20:18 UTC
Permalink
Peter T. Daniels
2019-12-04 22:11:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by phil
Post by Richard Heathfield
Post by Spains Harden
True.  In BrE "oatmeal" might be used to refer to a colour, but the
stuff people have for breakfast is "porridge".
No it isn't.
Yes it is, for many of us.
Post by Spains Harden
How is it that people who live on the other side of the
world seem to know more about us than we do ourselves?
I live in the UK, and I call porridge "porridge". That you do not is
neither here nor there. There are people who do, and people who don't,
and you happen to be one of those people who don't. That doesn't mean
that none of us do.
<https://www.sainsburys.co.uk/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/gb/groceries/all-cereals/sainsburys-express-porridge-original-x10-sachets-270g>
Oatmeal would be the milled oats from which I could make porridge.
What happened to in England it's fed to horses?
Sam Plusnet
2019-12-05 03:12:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by phil
Oatmeal would be the milled oats from which I could make porridge.
What happened to in England it's fed to horses?
Your suggestion is barley credible.
--
Sam Plusnet
Richard Heathfield
2019-12-05 03:21:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by phil
Oatmeal would be the milled oats from which I could make porridge.
What happened to in England it's fed to horses?
Your suggestion is barley credible.
A rye reply indeed, but I'm amaized you didn't consider it too corny to
post.
--
Richard Heathfield
Email: rjh at cpax dot org dot uk
"Usenet is a strange place" - dmr 29 July 1999
Sig line 4 vacant - apply within
Tony Cooper
2019-12-05 03:24:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by phil
Oatmeal would be the milled oats from which I could make porridge.
What happened to in England it's fed to horses?
Your suggestion is barley credible.
You have to take PTD with a grain of salt.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Kerr-Mudd,John
2019-12-05 10:17:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by phil
Oatmeal would be the milled oats from which I could make porridge.
What happened to in England it's fed to horses?
Your suggestion is barley credible.
You have to take PTD with a grain of salt.
Another OT post.
--
Bah, and indeed, Humbug.
Peter T. Daniels
2019-12-05 15:45:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by phil
Oatmeal would be the milled oats from which I could make porridge.
What happened to in England it's fed to horses?
Your suggestion is barley credible.
*MY* suggestion?? Have you never read a single word about Dr. Johnson?
That one quote is probably by far the thing best known about him. Not
least because he was constantly teasing Boswell about his Northern
heritage.
Katy Jennison
2019-12-04 22:26:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by Spains Harden
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Stefan Ram
German web pages often explain that porridge is a food
popular in England, so I was surprised when I heard a
Russian teacher say in a video (explaining «каша»): "I know
that English-speaking people don't say 'porridge' anymore.".
|does anyone actually use the word porridge outside of fairy tales?
. But I still think that what the the Russian teacher said is
exaggerated (or maybe she was referring to the American use?).
I'm sure that in England people still use "porridge" when
appropriate.
True. In BrE "oatmeal" might be used to refer to a colour, but the
stuff people have for breakfast is "porridge".
No it isn't. How is it that people who live on the other side of the
world seem to know more about us than we do ourselves?
Er, I think Sam is on our side, the porridge side.

As others have said, the hot breakfast dish made either with rolled oats
or with steel-cut oatmeal is what most Rightpondians call porridge, and
most Leftpondians call oatmeal.

The word's occasionally also used of similar dishes made of other
grains, such as (rolled) barley (delicious).
--
Katy Jennison
Quinn C
2019-12-04 22:43:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by Katy Jennison
As others have said, the hot breakfast dish made either with rolled oats
or with steel-cut oatmeal is what most Rightpondians call porridge, and
most Leftpondians call oatmeal.
The word's occasionally also used of similar dishes made of other
grains, such as (rolled) barley (delicious).
I make a similar dish from "pot" or "pearl" barley - not rolled or
flakes. First step is lightly roasting it. Cooking takes longer than
for flakes, 15-20 minutes.
--
Bismarck ... Kaiser Wilhelm II and finally Hitler ... succeeded in
inculcating a lust for power and domination, a passion for unbridled
militarism, a contempt for democracy and individual freedom and a
longing for authority, for authoritarianism. -- William Shirer
Katy Jennison
2019-12-04 23:30:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by Quinn C
Post by Katy Jennison
As others have said, the hot breakfast dish made either with rolled oats
or with steel-cut oatmeal is what most Rightpondians call porridge, and
most Leftpondians call oatmeal.
The word's occasionally also used of similar dishes made of other
grains, such as (rolled) barley (delicious).
I make a similar dish from "pot" or "pearl" barley - not rolled or
flakes. First step is lightly roasting it. Cooking takes longer than
for flakes, 15-20 minutes.
We sometimes do that as a supper dish, equivalent to risotto. Also
delicious.
--
Katy Jennison
Ken Blake
2019-12-04 23:56:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by Katy Jennison
Post by Quinn C
Post by Katy Jennison
As others have said, the hot breakfast dish made either with rolled oats
or with steel-cut oatmeal is what most Rightpondians call porridge, and
most Leftpondians call oatmeal.
The word's occasionally also used of similar dishes made of other
grains, such as (rolled) barley (delicious).
I make a similar dish from "pot" or "pearl" barley - not rolled or
flakes. First step is lightly roasting it. Cooking takes longer than
for flakes, 15-20 minutes.
We sometimes do that as a supper dish, equivalent to risotto. Also
delicious.
Equivalent to risotto? Not to me. Although there are some similarities,
as far as I'm concerned it's more different than it is similar.

But I agree that it's delicious.
--
Ken
Ken Blake
2019-12-04 23:38:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by Katy Jennison
As others have said, the hot breakfast dish made either with rolled oats
or with steel-cut oatmeal is what most Rightpondians call porridge, and
most Leftpondians call oatmeal.
Yes, but I'll just bump that statement up a little higher. For
leftpondians it's much more than "most." Almost all leftpondians call it
oatmeal. I've never seen "porridge" on a menu here nor heard anyone here
call it "porridge."
Post by Katy Jennison
The word's occasionally also used of similar dishes made of other
grains, such as (rolled) barley (delicious).
Yes, I like barley (especially pearled barley) a lot. Most leftpondians
never eat it.
--
Ken
Sam Plusnet
2019-12-05 03:09:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by Katy Jennison
Post by Spains Harden
    German web pages often explain that porridge is a food
    popular in England, so I was surprised when I heard a
    Russian teacher say in a video (explaining «каша»): "I know
    that English-speaking people don't say 'porridge' anymore.".
|does anyone actually use the word porridge outside of fairy tales?
    . But I still think that what the the Russian teacher said is
    exaggerated (or maybe she was referring to the American use?).
    I'm sure that in England people still use "porridge" when
    appropriate.
True.  In BrE "oatmeal" might be used to refer to a colour, but the
stuff people have for breakfast is "porridge".
No it isn't. How is it that people who live on the other side of the
world seem to know more about us than we do ourselves?
Er, I think Sam is on our side, the porridge side.
As others have said, the hot breakfast dish made either with rolled oats
or with steel-cut oatmeal is what most Rightpondians call porridge, and
most Leftpondians call oatmeal.
The word's occasionally also used of similar dishes made of other
grains, such as (rolled) barley (delicious).
Harden is just trolling.
--
Sam Plusnet
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2019-12-05 13:06:53 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 4 Dec 2019 22:26:57 +0000, Katy Jennison
Post by Katy Jennison
Post by Spains Harden
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Stefan Ram
German web pages often explain that porridge is a food
popular in England, so I was surprised when I heard a
Russian teacher say in a video (explaining «????»): "I know
that English-speaking people don't say 'porridge' anymore.".
|does anyone actually use the word porridge outside of fairy tales?
. But I still think that what the the Russian teacher said is
exaggerated (or maybe she was referring to the American use?).
I'm sure that in England people still use "porridge" when
appropriate.
True. In BrE "oatmeal" might be used to refer to a colour, but the
stuff people have for breakfast is "porridge".
No it isn't. How is it that people who live on the other side of the
world seem to know more about us than we do ourselves?
Er, I think Sam is on our side, the porridge side.
As others have said, the hot breakfast dish made either with rolled oats
or with steel-cut oatmeal is what most Rightpondians call porridge, and
most Leftpondians call oatmeal.
The word's occasionally also used of similar dishes made of other
grains, such as (rolled) barley (delicious).
A search on Sainsbury's supermarket website for "oats" find many
products including oats for making porridge/porage.

A search on that site for "oatmeal" yields just two results. One is for
Oatmeal & Raisin Cookies:
https://www.sainsburys.co.uk/shop/gb/groceries/sainsburys-oatmeal---raisin-cookies-x5-6544347-p

The other is for an oatmeal coloured cosmetic preparation.
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Janet
2019-12-05 13:02:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by Spains Harden
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Stefan Ram
German web pages often explain that porridge is a food
popular in England, so I was surprised when I heard a
Russian teacher say in a video (explaining «????»): "I know
that English-speaking people don't say 'porridge' anymore.".
|does anyone actually use the word porridge outside of fairy tales?
. But I still think that what the the Russian teacher said is
exaggerated (or maybe she was referring to the American use?).
I'm sure that in England people still use "porridge" when
appropriate.
True. In BrE "oatmeal" might be used to refer to a colour, but the
stuff people have for breakfast is "porridge".
No it isn't.
Yes it is.
Post by Spains Harden
How is it that people who live on the other side of the
world seem to know more about us than we do ourselves?
Your " English troll" impersonation is falling apart again.

Janet
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2019-12-05 01:09:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Stefan Ram
German web pages often explain that porridge is a food
popular in England, so I was surprised when I heard a
Russian teacher say in a video (explaining «????»): "I know
that English-speaking people don't say 'porridge' anymore.".
|does anyone actually use the word porridge outside of fairy tales?
. But I still think that what the the Russian teacher said is
exaggerated (or maybe she was referring to the American use?).
I'm sure that in England people still use "porridge" when
appropriate.
True. In BrE "oatmeal" might be used to refer to a colour, but the
stuff people have for breakfast is "porridge".
Yes. "Porridge/Porage" is the prepared ready-to-eat stuff. It is made by
heating a mixture of (porridge/porage) oats and water or milk.
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
charles
2019-12-04 22:25:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by Stefan Ram
German web pages often explain that porridge is a food
popular in England, so I was surprised when I heard a
Russian teacher say in a video (explaining ЋкашаЛ): "I know
that English-speaking people don't say 'porridge' anymore.".
|does anyone actually use the word porridge outside of fairy tales?
. But I still think that what the the Russian teacher said is
exaggerated (or maybe she was referring to the American use?).
I'm sure that in England people still use "porridge" when
appropriate.
and certainly in Scotland - usually offered on most hotel breakfast menus
--
from KT24 in Surrey, England
"I'd rather die of exhaustion than die of boredom" Thomas Carlyle
Paul Carmichael
2019-12-05 09:24:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by Stefan Ram
German web pages often explain that porridge is a food
popular in England, so I was surprised when I heard a
Russian teacher say in a video (explaining «каша»): "I know
that English-speaking people don't say 'porridge' anymore.".
|does anyone actually use the word porridge outside of fairy tales?
. But I still think that what the the Russian teacher said is
exaggerated (or maybe she was referring to the American use?).
I'm sure that in England people still use "porridge" when
appropriate.
As I type, my wife is eating porridge.
--
Paul.

https://paulc.es
Janet
2019-12-05 12:11:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by Stefan Ram
German web pages often explain that porridge is a food
popular in England, so I was surprised when I heard a
Russian teacher say in a video (explaining «????»): "I know
that English-speaking people don't say 'porridge' anymore.".
She was wrong. We had porridge for breakfast this morning.
Post by Stefan Ram
|does anyone actually use the word porridge outside of fairy tales?
. But I still think that what the the Russian teacher said is
exaggerated (or maybe she was referring to the American use?).
I'm sure that in England people still use "porridge" when
appropriate.
Of course; and so do people in Scotland, Wales and Ireland.
We're all referring to porridge made with oats.

Janet
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