Discussion:
colour vs. color
(too old to reply)
bruce bowser
2021-03-23 10:18:22 UTC
Permalink
Do you find either spelling particularly wrong or correct? If so, do you have any preferences?
Kerr-Mudd,John
2021-03-23 10:32:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by bruce bowser
Do you find either spelling particularly wrong or correct? If so, do
you have any preferences?
spell it 'kulur'. Simples!
--
Bah, and indeed, Humbug.
J. J. Lodder
2021-03-23 10:52:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by bruce bowser
Do you find either spelling particularly wrong or correct?
If so, do you have any preferences?
It is the best example ever of how NOT to do a spelling reform,

Jan
Janet
2021-03-23 11:48:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by bruce bowser
Do you find either spelling particularly wrong or correct?
If so, do you have any preferences?
I think we should all choose our own

Lyme Grean.
Lewis
2021-03-23 14:47:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by Janet
Post by bruce bowser
Do you find either spelling particularly wrong or correct?
If so, do you have any preferences?
The bolour supplement.
Post by Janet
I think we should all choose our own
Lyme Grean.
Greene, Shirley!
--
Mom: There was more than one lobster present at the birth of Jesus?
Daughter: Duh.
Kerr-Mudd,John
2021-03-23 16:21:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lewis
Post by Janet
Post by bruce bowser
Do you find either spelling particularly wrong or correct?
If so, do you have any preferences?
The bolour supplement.
What's the point on being herded into busses going the hotel
Bontinental...
Post by Lewis
Post by Janet
I think we should all choose our own
Lyme Grean.
Greene, Shirley!
Soilent Movie at 10.
Bone apper tite!
--
Bah, and indeed, Humbug.
CDB
2021-03-23 13:25:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by bruce bowser
Do you find either spelling particularly wrong or correct?
No.
Post by bruce bowser
If so, do you have any preferences?
Yes. And I really think you should have said "if not". If I found one
spelling particularly wrong, it would be incorrect of me to prefer it.
Quinn C
2021-03-23 14:22:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by CDB
Post by bruce bowser
Do you find either spelling particularly wrong or correct?
No.
Post by bruce bowser
If so, do you have any preferences?
Yes. And I really think you should have said "if not". If I found one
spelling particularly wrong, it would be incorrect of me to prefer it.
You underestimate human complexity.
--
The need of a personal pronoun of the singular number and common
gender is so desperate, urgent, imperative, that ... it should long
since have grown on our speech -- The Atlantic Monthly (1878)
Garrett Wollman
2021-03-23 15:51:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by bruce bowser
Do you find either spelling particularly wrong or correct?
No. They're different dialects.

I do find it particularly irritating when a retail business uses a
nonstandard-for-the-local-dialect spelling for pretentiousness -- a
couple of decades ago there was a veritable plague of shopping malls
calling themselves "Something-or-other Centre" because that's the
British spelling and everyone knows the Brits are classier. The only
recent example I can think of is the sports apparel comany Under
Armour, which I've read the story about.

I'm sufficiently accustomed to reading material intended for the
"global English ex-US" market that I rarely notice the spelling
differences. Vocabulary differences, on the other hand, I do still
notice, even when the intended meaning is clear and familiar to me. I
would guess that the same is true of most middle-class Americans, now
that the Internet has brought not only written material but radio and
television programs (other than costume dramas and 1980s sitcoms) from
other countries.

-GAWollman
--
Garrett A. Wollman | "Act to avoid constraining the future; if you can,
***@bimajority.org| act to remove constraint from the future. This is
Opinions not shared by| a thing you can do, are able to do, to do together."
my employers. | - Graydon Saunders, _A Succession of Bad Days_ (2015)
s***@my-deja.com
2021-03-23 16:07:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by bruce bowser
Do you find either spelling particularly wrong or correct?
No. They're different dialects.
I do find it particularly irritating when a retail business uses a
nonstandard-for-the-local-dialect spelling for pretentiousness -- a
couple of decades ago there was a veritable plague of shopping malls
calling themselves "Something-or-other Centre" because that's the
British spelling and everyone knows the Brits are classier. The only
recent example I can think of is the sports apparel company Under
Armour, which I've read the story about.
I'm sufficiently accustomed to reading material intended for the
"global English ex-US" market that I rarely notice the spelling
differences. Vocabulary differences, on the other hand, I do still
notice, even when the intended meaning is clear and familiar to me. I
would guess that the same is true of most middle-class Americans, now
that the Internet has brought not only written material but radio and
television programs (other than costume dramas and 1980s sitcoms) from
other countries.
"Plumb Center" is/was the same situation in reverse.
Kerr-Mudd,John
2021-03-23 16:22:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by s***@my-deja.com
Post by bruce bowser
Do you find either spelling particularly wrong or correct?
No. They're different dialects.
I do find it particularly irritating when a retail business uses a
nonstandard-for-the-local-dialect spelling for pretentiousness -- a
couple of decades ago there was a veritable plague of shopping malls
calling themselves "Something-or-other Centre" because that's the
British spelling and everyone knows the Brits are classier. The only
recent example I can think of is the sports apparel company Under
Armour, which I've read the story about.
I'm sufficiently accustomed to reading material intended for the
"global English ex-US" market that I rarely notice the spelling
differences. Vocabulary differences, on the other hand, I do still
notice, even when the intended meaning is clear and familiar to me. I
would guess that the same is true of most middle-class Americans, now
that the Internet has brought not only written material but radio and
television programs (other than costume dramas and 1980s sitcoms) from
other countries.
"Plumb Center" is/was the same situation in reverse.
Possibly done before: "Computacenter"
--
Bah, and indeed, Humbug.
Jerry Friedman
2021-03-23 17:28:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
Post by s***@my-deja.com
Post by bruce bowser
Do you find either spelling particularly wrong or correct?
No. They're different dialects.
I do find it particularly irritating when a retail business uses a
nonstandard-for-the-local-dialect spelling for pretentiousness -- a
couple of decades ago there was a veritable plague of shopping malls
calling themselves "Something-or-other Centre" because that's the
British spelling and everyone knows the Brits are classier. The only
recent example I can think of is the sports apparel company Under
Armour, which I've read the story about.
I'm sufficiently accustomed to reading material intended for the
"global English ex-US" market that I rarely notice the spelling
differences. Vocabulary differences, on the other hand, I do still
notice, even when the intended meaning is clear and familiar to me. I
would guess that the same is true of most middle-class Americans, now
that the Internet has brought not only written material but radio and
television programs (other than costume dramas and 1980s sitcoms) from
other countries.
"Plumb Center" is/was the same situation in reverse.
Possibly done before: "Computacenter"
What was wrong with "Computacenta"?
--
Jerry Friedman
charles
2021-03-23 16:45:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by Garrett Wollman
Post by bruce bowser
Do you find either spelling particularly wrong or correct?
No. They're different dialects.
I do find it particularly irritating when a retail business uses a
nonstandard-for-the-local-dialect spelling for pretentiousness -- a
couple of decades ago there was a veritable plague of shopping malls
calling themselves "Something-or-other Centre" because that's the
British spelling and everyone knows the Brits are classier.
In London, in tehn70s & early 80s, we had the ground (first) floor of our
office building telling us it was the "US Government Trade Center".
--
from KT24 in Surrey, England
"I'd rather die of exhaustion than die of boredom" Thomas Carlyle
Tony Cooper
2021-03-23 17:07:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by Garrett Wollman
Post by bruce bowser
Do you find either spelling particularly wrong or correct?
No. They're different dialects.
I do find it particularly irritating when a retail business uses a
nonstandard-for-the-local-dialect spelling for pretentiousness -- a
couple of decades ago there was a veritable plague of shopping malls
calling themselves "Something-or-other Centre" because that's the
British spelling and everyone knows the Brits are classier. The only
recent example I can think of is the sports apparel comany Under
Armour, which I've read the story about.
A shopping center/centre in the US may have movie theater/theatre as
part of it.
--
Tony Cooper Orlando Florida
Quinn C
2021-03-23 17:11:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by Garrett Wollman
Post by bruce bowser
Do you find either spelling particularly wrong or correct?
No. They're different dialects.
I do find it particularly irritating when a retail business uses a
nonstandard-for-the-local-dialect spelling for pretentiousness -- a
couple of decades ago there was a veritable plague of shopping malls
calling themselves "Something-or-other Centre" because that's the
British spelling and everyone knows the Brits are classier. The only
recent example I can think of is the sports apparel comany Under
Armour, which I've read the story about.
What about "theatre"? Almost all the institutions, professional
organizations etc. use that spelling in their names.

Can't be easy to keep a page like this straight:
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Regional_theater_in_the_United_States>

By the way:
| The term regional theatre most often refers to a professional theatre
| outside New York City.

Whoa! Really? Chicago or LA as reginoal as Poughkeepsie in this case?
--
Bring home one dismembered body part, once, mind you, once,
and people get twitchy about checking your luggage ever after.
-- Vicereine Cordelia
in L. McMaster Bujold, Gentleman Jole and the Red Queen
Jerry Friedman
2021-03-23 17:57:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by Quinn C
Post by Garrett Wollman
Post by bruce bowser
Do you find either spelling particularly wrong or correct?
No. They're different dialects.
I do find it particularly irritating when a retail business uses a
nonstandard-for-the-local-dialect spelling for pretentiousness -- a
couple of decades ago there was a veritable plague of shopping malls
calling themselves "Something-or-other Centre" because that's the
British spelling and everyone knows the Brits are classier. The only
recent example I can think of is the sports apparel comany Under
Armour, which I've read the story about.
What about "theatre"? Almost all the institutions, professional
organizations etc. use that spelling in their names.
Yes, sad to say, some Americans distinguish--you see movies, which come
from Hollywood, in a theatre; you see plays, which come from
Stratford-upon-Avon or Broadway (which is only an ocean away from
England) in a theatre.
Post by Quinn C
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Regional_theater_in_the_United_States>
| The term regional theatre most often refers to a professional theatre
| outside New York City.
Whoa! Really? Chicago or LA as reginoal as Poughkeepsie in this case?
Sounds familiar. New York is the only place in the U.S. where live
theater is not in a region.
--
Jerry Friedman
Jerry Friedman
2021-03-23 20:48:00 UTC
Permalink
On Tuesday, March 23, 2021 at 11:57:37 AM UTC-6, Jerry Friedman wrote:

[pretentious transpondian spellings]
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Quinn C
What about "theatre"? Almost all the institutions, professional
organizations etc. use that spelling in their names.
Yes, sad to say, some Americans distinguish--you see movies, which come
from Hollywood, in a theatre; you see plays, which come from
Stratford-upon-Avon or Broadway (which is only an ocean away from
England) in a theatre.
...

No, no, no. You see movies in a theater; you see plays in a theatre.

Of course, not all Americans use those spellings that way.
--
Jerry Friedman
Garrett Wollman
2021-03-23 21:20:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by Quinn C
| The term regional theatre most often refers to a professional theatre
| outside New York City.
Whoa! Really? Chicago or LA as reginoal as Poughkeepsie in this case?
Yep. New York so dominates theatrical employment that one of its
streets is practically synonymous with the industry -- "Broadway".
The only city in the US that even comes close is Las Vegas. Compare
"Wall Street", "Sand Hill Road" (venture capital), "the Strip"
(casinos), "Bourbon Street" (Mardi Gras), etc.

In terms of full-time theaters, most large cities have a few, owned or
managed by large national promoters like Live Nation, that serve both
national touring shows (primarily musicals) and concert tours, in
addition to a few non-profit theaters that put on their own
productions of "serious" plays nobody wants to see. Only in New York
are there enough venues, audiences, and talent that "serious" plays
can be done on a for-profit basis.

-GAWollman
--
Garrett A. Wollman | "Act to avoid constraining the future; if you can,
***@bimajority.org| act to remove constraint from the future. This is
Opinions not shared by| a thing you can do, are able to do, to do together."
my employers. | - Graydon Saunders, _A Succession of Bad Days_ (2015)
Lewis
2021-03-23 17:51:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by Garrett Wollman
Post by bruce bowser
Do you find either spelling particularly wrong or correct?
No. They're different dialects.
I do find it particularly irritating when a retail business uses a
nonstandard-for-the-local-dialect spelling for pretentiousness -- a
couple of decades ago there was a veritable plague of shopping malls
calling themselves "Something-or-other Centre" because that's the
British spelling and everyone knows the Brits are classier. The only
recent example I can think of is the sports apparel comany Under
Armour, which I've read the story about.
Centre is very common in the US, and has been for a very long time.
Somce about 1950 it's been about 10% of the use of center, and before
that it was more common.

The trend you think of as new is older than you are, I think. And, of
course, "center" is quite modern, being barely 200 years old.

A quick look at Google found a Boston Directory from 1870 "thence by the
centre of the avenue leading from Warren bridge to Causeway" which is
talking about the US City of Boston. Finding example from the 19th
century and the early 20th century in the US is not difficult (center
didn't pass centre in the US corpus until about 1890).

Theatre, as well, though theater didn't pass theatre in the US corpus
until the 1970s.
--
In the 60's, people took acid to make the world appear weird. Now the
world is weird and people take Prozac to make it appear normal.
musika
2021-03-23 19:35:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lewis
Post by Garrett Wollman
Post by bruce bowser
Do you find either spelling particularly wrong or correct?
No. They're different dialects.
I do find it particularly irritating when a retail business uses a
nonstandard-for-the-local-dialect spelling for pretentiousness -- a
couple of decades ago there was a veritable plague of shopping malls
calling themselves "Something-or-other Centre" because that's the
British spelling and everyone knows the Brits are classier. The only
recent example I can think of is the sports apparel comany Under
Armour, which I've read the story about.
Centre is very common in the US, and has been for a very long time.
Somce about 1950 it's been about 10% of the use of center, and before
that it was more common.
The trend you think of as new is older than you are, I think. And, of
course, "center" is quite modern, being barely 200 years old.
h
Center has been around a lot longer than the USA has. Shakespeare and
Milton bear witness.
Centre only took over in Britland after Johnson used that spelling in
his dictionary.
--
Ray
UK
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