Discussion:
colour vs. color
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bruce bowser
2021-03-23 10:18:22 UTC
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Do you find either spelling particularly wrong or correct? If so, do you have any preferences?
Kerr-Mudd,John
2021-03-23 10:32:24 UTC
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Post by bruce bowser
Do you find either spelling particularly wrong or correct? If so, do
you have any preferences?
spell it 'kulur'. Simples!
--
Bah, and indeed, Humbug.
J. J. Lodder
2021-03-23 10:52:53 UTC
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Post by bruce bowser
Do you find either spelling particularly wrong or correct?
If so, do you have any preferences?
It is the best example ever of how NOT to do a spelling reform,

Jan
Janet
2021-03-23 11:48:04 UTC
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Post by bruce bowser
Do you find either spelling particularly wrong or correct?
If so, do you have any preferences?
I think we should all choose our own

Lyme Grean.
Lewis
2021-03-23 14:47:02 UTC
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Post by Janet
Post by bruce bowser
Do you find either spelling particularly wrong or correct?
If so, do you have any preferences?
The bolour supplement.
Post by Janet
I think we should all choose our own
Lyme Grean.
Greene, Shirley!
--
Mom: There was more than one lobster present at the birth of Jesus?
Daughter: Duh.
Kerr-Mudd,John
2021-03-23 16:21:21 UTC
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Post by Lewis
Post by Janet
Post by bruce bowser
Do you find either spelling particularly wrong or correct?
If so, do you have any preferences?
The bolour supplement.
What's the point on being herded into busses going the hotel
Bontinental...
Post by Lewis
Post by Janet
I think we should all choose our own
Lyme Grean.
Greene, Shirley!
Soilent Movie at 10.
Bone apper tite!
--
Bah, and indeed, Humbug.
CDB
2021-03-23 13:25:36 UTC
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Post by bruce bowser
Do you find either spelling particularly wrong or correct?
No.
Post by bruce bowser
If so, do you have any preferences?
Yes. And I really think you should have said "if not". If I found one
spelling particularly wrong, it would be incorrect of me to prefer it.
Quinn C
2021-03-23 14:22:02 UTC
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Post by CDB
Post by bruce bowser
Do you find either spelling particularly wrong or correct?
No.
Post by bruce bowser
If so, do you have any preferences?
Yes. And I really think you should have said "if not". If I found one
spelling particularly wrong, it would be incorrect of me to prefer it.
You underestimate human complexity.
--
The need of a personal pronoun of the singular number and common
gender is so desperate, urgent, imperative, that ... it should long
since have grown on our speech -- The Atlantic Monthly (1878)
CDB
2021-03-24 12:57:15 UTC
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Post by Quinn C
Post by CDB
Post by bruce bowser
Do you find either spelling particularly wrong or correct?
No.
Post by bruce bowser
If so, do you have any preferences?
Yes. And I really think you should have said "if not". If I found
one spelling particularly wrong, it would be incorrect of me to
prefer it.
You underestimate human complexity.
You never know, you know.
Garrett Wollman
2021-03-23 15:51:16 UTC
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Post by bruce bowser
Do you find either spelling particularly wrong or correct?
No. They're different dialects.

I do find it particularly irritating when a retail business uses a
nonstandard-for-the-local-dialect spelling for pretentiousness -- a
couple of decades ago there was a veritable plague of shopping malls
calling themselves "Something-or-other Centre" because that's the
British spelling and everyone knows the Brits are classier. The only
recent example I can think of is the sports apparel comany Under
Armour, which I've read the story about.

I'm sufficiently accustomed to reading material intended for the
"global English ex-US" market that I rarely notice the spelling
differences. Vocabulary differences, on the other hand, I do still
notice, even when the intended meaning is clear and familiar to me. I
would guess that the same is true of most middle-class Americans, now
that the Internet has brought not only written material but radio and
television programs (other than costume dramas and 1980s sitcoms) from
other countries.

-GAWollman
--
Garrett A. Wollman | "Act to avoid constraining the future; if you can,
***@bimajority.org| act to remove constraint from the future. This is
Opinions not shared by| a thing you can do, are able to do, to do together."
my employers. | - Graydon Saunders, _A Succession of Bad Days_ (2015)
s***@my-deja.com
2021-03-23 16:07:44 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by bruce bowser
Do you find either spelling particularly wrong or correct?
No. They're different dialects.
I do find it particularly irritating when a retail business uses a
nonstandard-for-the-local-dialect spelling for pretentiousness -- a
couple of decades ago there was a veritable plague of shopping malls
calling themselves "Something-or-other Centre" because that's the
British spelling and everyone knows the Brits are classier. The only
recent example I can think of is the sports apparel company Under
Armour, which I've read the story about.
I'm sufficiently accustomed to reading material intended for the
"global English ex-US" market that I rarely notice the spelling
differences. Vocabulary differences, on the other hand, I do still
notice, even when the intended meaning is clear and familiar to me. I
would guess that the same is true of most middle-class Americans, now
that the Internet has brought not only written material but radio and
television programs (other than costume dramas and 1980s sitcoms) from
other countries.
"Plumb Center" is/was the same situation in reverse.
Kerr-Mudd,John
2021-03-23 16:22:41 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by s***@my-deja.com
Post by bruce bowser
Do you find either spelling particularly wrong or correct?
No. They're different dialects.
I do find it particularly irritating when a retail business uses a
nonstandard-for-the-local-dialect spelling for pretentiousness -- a
couple of decades ago there was a veritable plague of shopping malls
calling themselves "Something-or-other Centre" because that's the
British spelling and everyone knows the Brits are classier. The only
recent example I can think of is the sports apparel company Under
Armour, which I've read the story about.
I'm sufficiently accustomed to reading material intended for the
"global English ex-US" market that I rarely notice the spelling
differences. Vocabulary differences, on the other hand, I do still
notice, even when the intended meaning is clear and familiar to me. I
would guess that the same is true of most middle-class Americans, now
that the Internet has brought not only written material but radio and
television programs (other than costume dramas and 1980s sitcoms) from
other countries.
"Plumb Center" is/was the same situation in reverse.
Possibly done before: "Computacenter"
--
Bah, and indeed, Humbug.
Jerry Friedman
2021-03-23 17:28:24 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
Post by s***@my-deja.com
Post by bruce bowser
Do you find either spelling particularly wrong or correct?
No. They're different dialects.
I do find it particularly irritating when a retail business uses a
nonstandard-for-the-local-dialect spelling for pretentiousness -- a
couple of decades ago there was a veritable plague of shopping malls
calling themselves "Something-or-other Centre" because that's the
British spelling and everyone knows the Brits are classier. The only
recent example I can think of is the sports apparel company Under
Armour, which I've read the story about.
I'm sufficiently accustomed to reading material intended for the
"global English ex-US" market that I rarely notice the spelling
differences. Vocabulary differences, on the other hand, I do still
notice, even when the intended meaning is clear and familiar to me. I
would guess that the same is true of most middle-class Americans, now
that the Internet has brought not only written material but radio and
television programs (other than costume dramas and 1980s sitcoms) from
other countries.
"Plumb Center" is/was the same situation in reverse.
Possibly done before: "Computacenter"
What was wrong with "Computacenta"?
--
Jerry Friedman
charles
2021-03-23 16:45:19 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Garrett Wollman
Post by bruce bowser
Do you find either spelling particularly wrong or correct?
No. They're different dialects.
I do find it particularly irritating when a retail business uses a
nonstandard-for-the-local-dialect spelling for pretentiousness -- a
couple of decades ago there was a veritable plague of shopping malls
calling themselves "Something-or-other Centre" because that's the
British spelling and everyone knows the Brits are classier.
In London, in tehn70s & early 80s, we had the ground (first) floor of our
office building telling us it was the "US Government Trade Center".
--
from KT24 in Surrey, England
"I'd rather die of exhaustion than die of boredom" Thomas Carlyle
Tony Cooper
2021-03-23 17:07:17 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Garrett Wollman
Post by bruce bowser
Do you find either spelling particularly wrong or correct?
No. They're different dialects.
I do find it particularly irritating when a retail business uses a
nonstandard-for-the-local-dialect spelling for pretentiousness -- a
couple of decades ago there was a veritable plague of shopping malls
calling themselves "Something-or-other Centre" because that's the
British spelling and everyone knows the Brits are classier. The only
recent example I can think of is the sports apparel comany Under
Armour, which I've read the story about.
A shopping center/centre in the US may have movie theater/theatre as
part of it.
--
Tony Cooper Orlando Florida
Quinn C
2021-03-23 17:11:39 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Garrett Wollman
Post by bruce bowser
Do you find either spelling particularly wrong or correct?
No. They're different dialects.
I do find it particularly irritating when a retail business uses a
nonstandard-for-the-local-dialect spelling for pretentiousness -- a
couple of decades ago there was a veritable plague of shopping malls
calling themselves "Something-or-other Centre" because that's the
British spelling and everyone knows the Brits are classier. The only
recent example I can think of is the sports apparel comany Under
Armour, which I've read the story about.
What about "theatre"? Almost all the institutions, professional
organizations etc. use that spelling in their names.

Can't be easy to keep a page like this straight:
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Regional_theater_in_the_United_States>

By the way:
| The term regional theatre most often refers to a professional theatre
| outside New York City.

Whoa! Really? Chicago or LA as reginoal as Poughkeepsie in this case?
--
Bring home one dismembered body part, once, mind you, once,
and people get twitchy about checking your luggage ever after.
-- Vicereine Cordelia
in L. McMaster Bujold, Gentleman Jole and the Red Queen
Jerry Friedman
2021-03-23 17:57:32 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Quinn C
Post by Garrett Wollman
Post by bruce bowser
Do you find either spelling particularly wrong or correct?
No. They're different dialects.
I do find it particularly irritating when a retail business uses a
nonstandard-for-the-local-dialect spelling for pretentiousness -- a
couple of decades ago there was a veritable plague of shopping malls
calling themselves "Something-or-other Centre" because that's the
British spelling and everyone knows the Brits are classier. The only
recent example I can think of is the sports apparel comany Under
Armour, which I've read the story about.
What about "theatre"? Almost all the institutions, professional
organizations etc. use that spelling in their names.
Yes, sad to say, some Americans distinguish--you see movies, which come
from Hollywood, in a theatre; you see plays, which come from
Stratford-upon-Avon or Broadway (which is only an ocean away from
England) in a theatre.
Post by Quinn C
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Regional_theater_in_the_United_States>
| The term regional theatre most often refers to a professional theatre
| outside New York City.
Whoa! Really? Chicago or LA as reginoal as Poughkeepsie in this case?
Sounds familiar. New York is the only place in the U.S. where live
theater is not in a region.
--
Jerry Friedman
Jerry Friedman
2021-03-23 20:48:00 UTC
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Permalink
On Tuesday, March 23, 2021 at 11:57:37 AM UTC-6, Jerry Friedman wrote:

[pretentious transpondian spellings]
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Quinn C
What about "theatre"? Almost all the institutions, professional
organizations etc. use that spelling in their names.
Yes, sad to say, some Americans distinguish--you see movies, which come
from Hollywood, in a theatre; you see plays, which come from
Stratford-upon-Avon or Broadway (which is only an ocean away from
England) in a theatre.
...

No, no, no. You see movies in a theater; you see plays in a theatre.

Of course, not all Americans use those spellings that way.
--
Jerry Friedman
Garrett Wollman
2021-03-23 21:20:14 UTC
Reply
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Post by Quinn C
| The term regional theatre most often refers to a professional theatre
| outside New York City.
Whoa! Really? Chicago or LA as reginoal as Poughkeepsie in this case?
Yep. New York so dominates theatrical employment that one of its
streets is practically synonymous with the industry -- "Broadway".
The only city in the US that even comes close is Las Vegas. Compare
"Wall Street", "Sand Hill Road" (venture capital), "the Strip"
(casinos), "Bourbon Street" (Mardi Gras), etc.

In terms of full-time theaters, most large cities have a few, owned or
managed by large national promoters like Live Nation, that serve both
national touring shows (primarily musicals) and concert tours, in
addition to a few non-profit theaters that put on their own
productions of "serious" plays nobody wants to see. Only in New York
are there enough venues, audiences, and talent that "serious" plays
can be done on a for-profit basis.

-GAWollman
--
Garrett A. Wollman | "Act to avoid constraining the future; if you can,
***@bimajority.org| act to remove constraint from the future. This is
Opinions not shared by| a thing you can do, are able to do, to do together."
my employers. | - Graydon Saunders, _A Succession of Bad Days_ (2015)
bruce bowser
2021-03-23 21:36:22 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Quinn C
| The term regional theatre most often refers to a professional theatre
| outside New York City.
Whoa! Really? Chicago or LA as reginoal as Poughkeepsie in this case?
Yep. New York so dominates theatrical employment that one of its
streets is practically synonymous with the industry -- "Broadway".
The only city in the US that even comes close is Las Vegas. Compare
"Wall Street", "Sand Hill Road" (venture capital), "the Strip"
(casinos), "Bourbon Street" (Mardi Gras), etc.
In terms of full-time theaters, most large cities have a few, owned or
managed by large national promoters like Live Nation, that serve both
national touring shows (primarily musicals) and concert tours, in
addition to a few non-profit theaters that put on their own
productions of "serious" plays nobody wants to see. Only in New York
are there enough venues, audiences, and talent that "serious" plays
can be done on a for-profit basis.
-GAWollman
Well yes, Paris, London and NY are where plays do the best financially.
Peter Moylan
2021-03-24 01:03:06 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Quinn C
| The term regional theatre most often refers to a professional theatre
| outside New York City.
Whoa! Really? Chicago or LA as reginoal as Poughkeepsie in this case?
This is a source of great annoyance to people in Newcastle. When the
state government announces regional spending, it turns out that
Newcastle is not regional. When it's for cities, Newcastle is not a
city. Either way, we miss out.

We all know that the real reason is that this region never votes for the
Liberals, therefore we're not on the pork barrel list.
--
Peter Moylan Newcastle, NSW http://www.pmoylan.org
Chrysi Cat
2021-03-24 01:14:22 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Quinn C
| The term regional theatre most often refers to a professional theatre
| outside New York City.
Whoa! Really? Chicago or LA as reginoal as Poughkeepsie in this case?
This is a source of great annoyance to people in Newcastle. When the
state government announces regional spending, it turns out that
Newcastle is not regional. When it's for cities, Newcastle is not a
city. Either way, we miss out.
We all know that the real reason is that this region never votes for the
Liberals, therefore we're not on the pork barrel list.
And what happens if Labor ever takes over NSW?

Oh, right, that's likely as possible as Wyoming electing Democrats.
--
Chrysi Cat
1/2 anthrocat, nearly 1/2 anthrofox, all magical
Transgoddess, quick to anger. [she/her. Misgender and die].
Call me Chrysi or call me Kat, I'll respond to either!
Peter Moylan
2021-03-24 01:46:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Chrysi Cat
Post by Peter Moylan
By the way: | The term regional theatre most often refers to a
professional theatre | outside New York City.
Whoa! Really? Chicago or LA as reginoal as Poughkeepsie in this case?
This is a source of great annoyance to people in Newcastle. When
the state government announces regional spending, it turns out
that Newcastle is not regional. When it's for cities, Newcastle is
not a city. Either way, we miss out.
We all know that the real reason is that this region never votes
for the Liberals, therefore we're not on the pork barrel list.
And what happens if Labor ever takes over NSW?
Oh, right, that's likely as possible as Wyoming electing Democrats.
Oh, it's possible. The present state government stinks to high heaven,
and might well be thrown out at the next election because of the
cumulative effect of corruption scandals.

The custom in this state is that the incumbent party loses office once
the corruption level is too high to ignore, so we do have a steady
alternation.

Labor governments have been no better, historically, but they don't have
quite the same pork-barreling history. They're corrupt in different ways.
--
Peter Moylan Newcastle, NSW http://www.pmoylan.org
Mark Brader
2021-03-24 04:21:37 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
This is a source of great annoyance to people in Newcastle. When the
state government announces regional spending, it turns out that
Newcastle is not regional. When it's for cities, Newcastle is not a
city.
This reminds me of the Metropolitan Railway. When the British government
forced the countriy's 120+ railways to merge into four, they were excused
on the grounds that they only operated in the London area. Then 12 years
later the British government forced the control of London's underground
railways to be turned over to an appointed board -- and the Metropolitan
demanded to be excused on the grounds that they were a main-line railway.

They lost that one, though.
--
Mark Brader | Well, unfortunately, that is impossible, or very difficult, or
Toronto | highly inadvisable, or would require legislation--one of those.
***@vex.net | -- Sir Humphrey ("Yes Minister", Lynn & Jay)

My text in this article is in the public domain.
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2021-03-24 08:13:24 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Quinn C
| The term regional theatre most often refers to a professional theatre
| outside New York City.
Whoa! Really? Chicago or LA as reginoal as Poughkeepsie in this case?
This is a source of great annoyance to people in Newcastle. When the
state government announces regional spending, it turns out that
Newcastle is not regional. When it's for cities, Newcastle is not a
city. Either way, we miss out.
Something the UK Post Office used to complain about is that when people
wanted to address a letter to Newcastle-upon-Tyne they wrote
"Newcastle-upon-Tyne" on the envelope. So far so good. But when people
wanted to send one to Newcastle-under-Lyme (a much less well known
place) they just wrote "Newcastle" and expected the Post Office to
guess which one they meant.

I suppose occasionally they had ones where Newcastle, NSW, was
intended. At least twice when I lived in Birmingham I received letters
from the USA that had been rerouted via Indianapolis. Why? you may ask.
Because my postcode was B31 1ND. I once had one that had "Missent to
Wake" rubber-stamped on it: I never figured out why such a weird error
might be made. Maybe it got attached to one that really was going to
Wake Island.
Post by Peter Moylan
We all know that the real reason is that this region never votes for the
Liberals, therefore we're not on the pork barrel list.
--
Athel -- British, living in France for 34 years
Peter T. Daniels
2021-03-24 14:29:31 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Something the UK Post Office used to complain about is that when people
"Newcastle-upon-Tyne" on the envelope. So far so good. But when people
wanted to send one to Newcastle-under-Lyme (a much less well known
place) they just wrote "Newcastle" and expected the Post Office to
guess which one they meant.
I suppose occasionally they had ones where Newcastle, NSW, was
intended. At least twice when I lived in Birmingham I received letters
from the USA that had been rerouted via Indianapolis. Why? you may ask.
Because my postcode was B31 1ND. I once had one that had "Missent to
Wake" rubber-stamped on it: I never figured out why such a weird error
might be made. Maybe it got attached to one that really was going to
Wake Island.
Wake Island's ZIP Code is 96898. It's in Honolulu County, HI.
s***@my-deja.com
2021-03-24 16:04:02 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Something the UK Post Office used to complain about is that when people
"Newcastle-upon-Tyne" on the envelope. So far so good. But when people
wanted to send one to Newcastle-under-Lyme (a much less well known
place) they just wrote "Newcastle" and expected the Post Office to
guess which one they meant.
I suppose occasionally they had ones where Newcastle, NSW, was
intended. At least twice when I lived in Birmingham I received letters
from the USA that had been rerouted via Indianapolis. Why? you may ask.
Because my postcode was B31 1ND. I once had one that had "Missent to
Wake" rubber-stamped on it: I never figured out why such a weird error
might be made. Maybe it got attached to one that really was going to
Wake Island.
Within the UK all you need is the house/building number and the postcode.
This eliminates the "which Newcastle/which Newport" problem completely.
Other potentially misleading names can just be omitted.

Of course when sending from another country it is wise to include
the nation of destination, in both languages if appropriate.
Tony Cooper
2021-03-24 16:21:21 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by s***@my-deja.com
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Something the UK Post Office used to complain about is that when people
"Newcastle-upon-Tyne" on the envelope. So far so good. But when people
wanted to send one to Newcastle-under-Lyme (a much less well known
place) they just wrote "Newcastle" and expected the Post Office to
guess which one they meant.
I suppose occasionally they had ones where Newcastle, NSW, was
intended. At least twice when I lived in Birmingham I received letters
from the USA that had been rerouted via Indianapolis. Why? you may ask.
Because my postcode was B31 1ND. I once had one that had "Missent to
Wake" rubber-stamped on it: I never figured out why such a weird error
might be made. Maybe it got attached to one that really was going to
Wake Island.
Within the UK all you need is the house/building number and the postcode.
This eliminates the "which Newcastle/which Newport" problem completely.
Other potentially misleading names can just be omitted.
Of course when sending from another country it is wise to include
the nation of destination, in both languages if appropriate.
Theoretically, I can address an envelope using only the person's name
and the ZIP plus four to a US postal patron. The "plus four" is the
street address. I've never tried it, though.
--
Tony Cooper Orlando Florida
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2021-03-24 18:08:07 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by s***@my-deja.com
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Something the UK Post Office used to complain about is that when people
"Newcastle-upon-Tyne" on the envelope. So far so good. But when people
wanted to send one to Newcastle-under-Lyme (a much less well known
place) they just wrote "Newcastle" and expected the Post Office to
guess which one they meant.
I suppose occasionally they had ones where Newcastle, NSW, was
intended. At least twice when I lived in Birmingham I received letters
from the USA that had been rerouted via Indianapolis. Why? you may ask.
Because my postcode was B31 1ND. I once had one that had "Missent to
Wake" rubber-stamped on it: I never figured out why such a weird error
might be made. Maybe it got attached to one that really was going to
Wake Island.
Within the UK all you need is the house/building number and the postcode.
This eliminates the "which Newcastle/which Newport" problem completely.
Other potentially misleading names can just be omitted.
Of course when sending from another country it is wise to include
the nation of destination, in both languages if appropriate.
Theoretically, I can address an envelope using only the person's name
and the ZIP plus four to a US postal patron. The "plus four" is the
street address. I've never tried it, though.
Back in the 1930s there was said to be a letter addressed to "(Person's
name), Arijaba", which was delivered without delay to the right person
near the harbour in Harwich. I think Ernest Gowers mentioned it in his
book Plain Words.
--
Athel -- British, living in France for 34 years
musika
2021-03-24 18:48:40 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by s***@my-deja.com
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Something the UK Post Office used to complain about is that when people
"Newcastle-upon-Tyne" on the envelope. So far so good. But when people
wanted to send one to Newcastle-under-Lyme (a much less well known
place) they just wrote "Newcastle" and expected the Post Office to
guess which one they meant.
I suppose occasionally they had ones where Newcastle, NSW, was
intended. At least twice when I lived in Birmingham I received letters
from the USA that had been rerouted via Indianapolis. Why? you may ask.
Because my postcode was B31 1ND. I once had one that had "Missent to
Wake" rubber-stamped on it: I never figured out why such a weird error
might be made. Maybe it got attached to one that really was going to
Wake Island.
Within the UK all you need is the house/building number and the postcode.
This eliminates the "which Newcastle/which Newport" problem completely.
Other potentially misleading names can just be  omitted.
Of course when sending from another country it is wise to include
the nation of destination, in both languages if appropriate.
Theoretically, I can address an envelope using only the person's name
and the ZIP plus four to a US postal patron.  The "plus four" is the
street address.  I've never tried it, though.
Back in the 1930s there was said to be a letter addressed to "(Person's
name), Arijaba", which was delivered without delay to the right person
near the harbour in Harwich. I think Ernest Gowers mentioned it in his
book Plain Words.
<https://www.bucksfreepress.co.uk/news/11485.its-not-what-you-say-it-is-the-way-you-say-it/>
--
Ray
UK
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2021-03-24 18:04:24 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by s***@my-deja.com
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Something the UK Post Office used to complain about is that when people
"Newcastle-upon-Tyne" on the envelope. So far so good. But when people
wanted to send one to Newcastle-under-Lyme (a much less well known
place) they just wrote "Newcastle" and expected the Post Office to
guess which one they meant.
I suppose occasionally they had ones where Newcastle, NSW, was
intended. At least twice when I lived in Birmingham I received letters
from the USA that had been rerouted via Indianapolis. Why? you may ask.
Because my postcode was B31 1ND. I once had one that had "Missent to
Wake" rubber-stamped on it: I never figured out why such a weird error
might be made. Maybe it got attached to one that really was going to
Wake Island.
Within the UK all you need is the house/building number and the postcode.
This eliminates the "which Newcastle/which Newport" problem completely.
Other potentially misleading names can just be omitted.
Of course when sending from another country it is wise to include
the nation of destination, in both languages if appropriate.
It was a long time ago, but I'm pretty sure that the letters that came
via Indianapolis had "England" on the envelope, but the sorter (or
sorting machine) overlooked it.
--
Athel -- British, living in France for 34 years
Tony Cooper
2021-03-24 18:49:38 UTC
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On Wed, 24 Mar 2021 19:04:24 +0100, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by s***@my-deja.com
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Something the UK Post Office used to complain about is that when people
"Newcastle-upon-Tyne" on the envelope. So far so good. But when people
wanted to send one to Newcastle-under-Lyme (a much less well known
place) they just wrote "Newcastle" and expected the Post Office to
guess which one they meant.
I suppose occasionally they had ones where Newcastle, NSW, was
intended. At least twice when I lived in Birmingham I received letters
from the USA that had been rerouted via Indianapolis. Why? you may ask.
Because my postcode was B31 1ND. I once had one that had "Missent to
Wake" rubber-stamped on it: I never figured out why such a weird error
might be made. Maybe it got attached to one that really was going to
Wake Island.
Within the UK all you need is the house/building number and the postcode.
This eliminates the "which Newcastle/which Newport" problem completely.
Other potentially misleading names can just be omitted.
Of course when sending from another country it is wise to include
the nation of destination, in both languages if appropriate.
It was a long time ago, but I'm pretty sure that the letters that came
via Indianapolis had "England" on the envelope, but the sorter (or
sorting machine) overlooked it.
There is both an English, Indiana and a London, Indiana in the state.
There is also a Bank of England located in Valparaiso, Indiana.

There is also a New Castle, Indiana and a Birmingham, Indiana.
--
Tony Cooper Orlando Florida
Lewis
2021-03-23 17:51:46 UTC
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Post by Garrett Wollman
Post by bruce bowser
Do you find either spelling particularly wrong or correct?
No. They're different dialects.
I do find it particularly irritating when a retail business uses a
nonstandard-for-the-local-dialect spelling for pretentiousness -- a
couple of decades ago there was a veritable plague of shopping malls
calling themselves "Something-or-other Centre" because that's the
British spelling and everyone knows the Brits are classier. The only
recent example I can think of is the sports apparel comany Under
Armour, which I've read the story about.
Centre is very common in the US, and has been for a very long time.
Somce about 1950 it's been about 10% of the use of center, and before
that it was more common.

The trend you think of as new is older than you are, I think. And, of
course, "center" is quite modern, being barely 200 years old.

A quick look at Google found a Boston Directory from 1870 "thence by the
centre of the avenue leading from Warren bridge to Causeway" which is
talking about the US City of Boston. Finding example from the 19th
century and the early 20th century in the US is not difficult (center
didn't pass centre in the US corpus until about 1890).

Theatre, as well, though theater didn't pass theatre in the US corpus
until the 1970s.
--
In the 60's, people took acid to make the world appear weird. Now the
world is weird and people take Prozac to make it appear normal.
musika
2021-03-23 19:35:11 UTC
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Post by Lewis
Post by Garrett Wollman
Post by bruce bowser
Do you find either spelling particularly wrong or correct?
No. They're different dialects.
I do find it particularly irritating when a retail business uses a
nonstandard-for-the-local-dialect spelling for pretentiousness -- a
couple of decades ago there was a veritable plague of shopping malls
calling themselves "Something-or-other Centre" because that's the
British spelling and everyone knows the Brits are classier. The only
recent example I can think of is the sports apparel comany Under
Armour, which I've read the story about.
Centre is very common in the US, and has been for a very long time.
Somce about 1950 it's been about 10% of the use of center, and before
that it was more common.
The trend you think of as new is older than you are, I think. And, of
course, "center" is quite modern, being barely 200 years old.
h
Center has been around a lot longer than the USA has. Shakespeare and
Milton bear witness.
Centre only took over in Britland after Johnson used that spelling in
his dictionary.
--
Ray
UK
Peter Moylan
2021-03-24 01:06:57 UTC
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Permalink
Post by musika
Post by Lewis
The trend you think of as new is older than you are, I think. And, of
course, "center" is quite modern, being barely 200 years old.
Center has been around a lot longer than the USA has. Shakespeare and
Milton bear witness.
Centre only took over in Britland after Johnson used that spelling in
his dictionary.
If we were serious about phonetic spelling (all dialects) we would spell
it "centr".
--
Peter Moylan Newcastle, NSW http://www.pmoylan.org
musika
2021-03-24 02:18:42 UTC
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Post by Peter Moylan
Post by musika
Post by Lewis
The trend you think of as new is older than you are, I think. And, of
course, "center" is quite modern, being barely 200 years old.
Center has been around a lot longer than the USA has. Shakespeare and
Milton bear witness.
Centre only took over in Britland after Johnson used that spelling in
his dictionary.
If we were serious about phonetic spelling (all dialects) we would spell
it "centr".
It would be easier to go back to centrum.
--
Ray
UK
Mark Brader
2021-03-24 04:22:18 UTC
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Post by Peter Moylan
If we were serious about phonetic spelling (all dialects) we would spell
it "centr".
I think you mean "sentr".
--
Mark Brader | "...very satisfying -- it's like the erosion geology edition
Toronto | of the electromagnetic spectrum chart."
***@vex.net | --Randall Munroe
Peter Moylan
2021-03-24 04:35:49 UTC
Reply
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Post by Mark Brader
Post by Peter Moylan
If we were serious about phonetic spelling (all dialects) we would spell
it "centr".
I think you mean "sentr".
Conceded.

We'll probably never go back to the Latin pronunciation with a [k].
--
Peter Moylan Newcastle, NSW http://www.pmoylan.org
Peter Moylan
2021-03-24 01:03:48 UTC
Reply
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Post by Garrett Wollman
Post by bruce bowser
Do you find either spelling particularly wrong or correct?
No. They're different dialects.
I do find it particularly irritating when a retail business uses a
nonstandard-for-the-local-dialect spelling for pretentiousness -- a
couple of decades ago there was a veritable plague of shopping malls
calling themselves "Something-or-other Centre" because that's the
British spelling and everyone knows the Brits are classier. The only
recent example I can think of is the sports apparel comany Under
Armour, which I've read the story about.
I thought we all agreed on the spelling of "amour".
--
Peter Moylan Newcastle, NSW http://www.pmoylan.org
Jerry Friedman
2021-03-24 01:28:46 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by bruce bowser
Do you find either spelling particularly wrong or correct?
No. They're different dialects.
I do find it particularly irritating when a retail business uses a
nonstandard-for-the-local-dialect spelling for pretentiousness -- a
couple of decades ago there was a veritable plague of shopping malls
calling themselves "Something-or-other Centre" because that's the
British spelling and everyone knows the Brits are classier. The only
recent example I can think of is the sports apparel comany Under
Armour, which I've read the story about.
I thought we all agreed on the spelling of "amour".
We do when it's a brand of clothing for Our Under Arm, but the shining
stuff knights wear is "armor" over/up/down here.
--
Jerry Friedman
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